6.7/10
12,068
105 user 132 critic

Brideshead Revisited (2008)

PG-13 | | Drama, Romance | 15 August 2008 (USA)
Trailer
2:30 | Trailer
A poignant story of forbidden love and the loss of innocence set in England prior to World War II.

Director:

Julian Jarrold
11 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Matthew Goode ... Charles Ryder
Thomas Morrison Thomas Morrison ... Hooper
David Barrass David Barrass ... Ship's Barber
Anna Madeley ... Celia Ryder
Sarah Crowden ... Lady Guest
Stephen Carlile ... English Lord
Peter Barnes Peter Barnes ... American Professor
Hayley Atwell ... Julia Flyte
Patrick Malahide ... Mr Ryder
Richard Teverson ... Cousin Jasper
Joseph Beattie ... Anthony Blanche
Ben Whishaw ... Sebastian Flyte
Roger Walker Roger Walker ... Lunt
Mark Field ... Boy Mulcaster
Mark Edel-Hunt Mark Edel-Hunt ... Oxford Student
Edit

Storyline

World War II. Charles Ryder (Matthew Goode), in his civilian life, rose out of his middle class London background, which includes being an atheist and having a distant relationship with his eccentric father, to become an up and coming artist. He is currently an Army officer, who is stationed at a makeshift camp set up at Brideshead estate before imminently getting shipped into battle. The locale, which is not unfamiliar to him, makes him reminisce about what ended up being his doomed relationship with Brideshead's owners, the Flytes, an ostentatiously wealthy family. Charles first met Sebastian Flyte (Ben Whishaw) when they both were students at Oxford, where Sebastian surprisingly welcomed Charles into his circle of equally wealthy, somewhat stuck-up, and flamboyant friends. Charles ended up getting caught up in Sebastian's family struggles, where Sebastian used excessive alcohol to deal with the pain resulting from his family relationships. Although Charles and Sebastian were more ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Every temptation has its price. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

David Yates was set to direct this movie, but had to step aside from the director's chair to direct Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007) instead. While Yates was attached, Paul Bettany, Jennifer Connelly, and Jude Law were cast in the roles of Charles, Julia, and Sebastian, respectively. It was also announced that Chatsworth House in Derbyshire would be used as Brideshead. See more »

Goofs

The water taxi that Charles, Sebastian and Julia take to Lord Marchmain's palazzo in Venice was built post-1960s. All Venetian water taxis before this were of solid wood construction, but the one used for filming is clearly of "cold-molded" construction, as one can readily see by the diagonal strips of veneer on the hull; something unknown before the advent of resin laid-up veneer hulls in the 1970s. See more »

Quotes

Cara: That woman nearly suffocated him... Well, just look at her children. Even when they were tiny, in the nursery, they must do what she wants them to do, be what she wants them to be. Only then would she love them. It's not Lady Marchmain's fault. Her God has done that to her.
Charles Ryder: But surely you're Catholic too.
Cara: Oh, yes, but a different sort. Well, it's different in Italy. Not so much guilt. We do what the heart tell us, and then we go to confession.
See more »


Soundtracks

With the Rumba Playing
Music & Lyrics by Terry Davies
Violin by Chris Garrick
Guitar by John Etheridge
See more »

User Reviews

 
Once More, Into Brideshead
1 August 2008 | by janos451See all my reviews

It's attributed to just about everybody - from Ginger Rogers to Milan Kundera - and it sounds so right: "There are no small parts, only small actors."

If you want proof and a real understanding of the adage, revisit "Brideshead Revisited," and behold the miracle of Emma Thompson's Lady Marchmain, sucking the life out of anything and anybody she touches, and Michael Gambon's delightfully dissolute Lord Marchmain. She has about 10 minutes on the screen, he perhaps four, and yet their characters will follow you out of the theater, and stay with you at length.

Thompson's work is especially dazzling because the mean, sanctimonious character is so clearly alien to the actress (in fact, I suspected miscasting when I first heard of her assignment) and also as the character is so exaggerated, almost a caricature. And yet, Thompson gives the challenge her all, and walks away with it; the performance has Best Supporting Actress written all over it.

It's difficult to believe that the man you see as Marchmain is the same actor who was the "Singing Detective" (of the superb BBC series, not the Robert Downey Jr. mishap). Gambon has a range as wide as all outdoors, and you never ever see effort in the performance. His amiable Marchmain - subtly hinting at a complex character under the surface - has a physical similarity to Gambon's Uncle Vanya on the London stage, but otherwise, it's a unique creation.

What else is there to this new "edition" of "Brideshead"? A great deal, but only if you're among those who missed both Evelyn Waugh's novel and the wonderful Granada TV realization 27 long years ago - Irons! Gielgud! Olivier! - how can you compete with that? So, if it's a first-time visit, see the movie by all means; if you can recite lines from the book or the TV series, you can survive without the new version.

In 135 minutes, the film is handling well what the TV series did so completely in - yes - 13 HOURS. Obviously, except for the basic story line (script by Jeremy Brock, of "The Last King of Scotland"), this is a different kind of animal, still "leisurely" enough, but unable to luxuriate in the smallest details as the series did. The director is Julian Jarrold, and he is doing far better than in his recent "Becoming Jane," keeps the story moving in a smooth fashion.

As to the leading roles in the film, they are all well acted, but without great impact. Matthew Goode is Charles Ryder, the focal character; Ben Whishaw is the slightly over-flamboyant Sebastian Flyte (who needs understating more than exaggerating - Anthony Andrews' performance in the TV series was exactly right); Hayley Atwell is Sebastian's sister (and rival for Charles' affection).

One amazing thing about "Brideshead" is how this story from a different time, about characters from a different world, remains interesting and meaningful. It's almost as if Waugh's work was bulletproof - not that these filmmakers were less than respectful to the author. A better test would be a Eurotrash opera version, heaven forfend.


47 of 72 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 105 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Facebook

Country:

UK | Italy | Morocco | USA

Language:

English | Italian | Arabic | Latin | French

Release Date:

15 August 2008 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Brideshead Revisited See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$339,616, 27 July 2008

Gross USA:

$6,432,256

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$13,451,186
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed