In a small Tokyo apartment, twelve-year-old Akira must care for his younger siblings after their mother leaves them and shows no sign of returning.

Director:

Hirokazu Koreeda
13 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Yûya Yagira ... Akira Fukushima
Ayu Kitaura Ayu Kitaura ... Kyoko
Hiei Kimura Hiei Kimura ... Shigeru
Momoko Shimizu Momoko Shimizu ... Yuki
Hanae Kan Hanae Kan ... Saki
You ... Keiko, the mother
Kazuyoshi Kushida Kazuyoshi Kushida ... Yoshinaga, The Landlord
Yukiko Okamoto Yukiko Okamoto ... Eriko Yoshinaga
Sei Hiraizumi Sei Hiraizumi ... Mini-market Manager
Ryô Kase ... Mini-market Employee
Takako Tate Takako Tate ... Mini-market teller
Yûichi Kimura Yûichi Kimura ... Sugihara (Taxi Driver)
Ken'ichi Endô ... Pachinko Parlor Employee
Susumu Terajima ... Baseball coach
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Shinichi Hashizawa Shinichi Hashizawa
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Storyline

In Tokyo, the reckless single mother Keiko moves to a small apartment with her twelve years old son Akira Fukushima and his siblings Shigeru and Yuki. Kyoko, another sibling arrives later by train. The children have different fathers and do not have schooling, but they have a happy life with their mother. When Keiko finds a new boyfriend, she leaves the children alone, giving some money to Akira and assigning him to take care of his siblings. When the money runs out, Akira manages to find means to survive with the youngsters without power supply, gas or water at home, and with the landlord asking for the rent. Written by Claudio Carvalho

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements and some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Filmed chronologically over almost an entire year. See more »

Goofs

When Akira buys the stack of chocolates for Yuki near the end of the movie, he buys 19 boxes and the total comes to 1,895 yen. As there was no sales tax at the time Japan, each box would have to be priced at 99.74 yen - which is essentially impossible. See more »

Quotes

Pachinko Parlor Employee: Shit. I'm 10 yen short. Lend me 10 yen.
Akira Fukushima: Ten yen?
Pachinko Parlor Employee: No big deal, huh? Lend me. What the hell is with that big wallet? What the hell is this?
Akira Fukushima: It's a hand-me-down from Mom.
Pachinko Parlor Employee: From who?
Akira Fukushima: From Mom.
Pachinko Parlor Employee: You moved, right? Roomy, huh? Any pubic hair comin', yet?
Akira Fukushima: No...
Pachinko Parlor Employee: Bullshit. I got mine in fifth grade.
Akira Fukushima: No way.
[...]
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Connections

References Bakuryuu Sentai Abaranger (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Houseki
Sung by Takako Tate
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User Reviews

 
A deeply moving film
16 February 2005 | by YNOT_at_the_MoviesSee all my reviews

Today I went to the pre-screening of "Nobody Knows," a stunningly brilliant film by director Hirokazu Koreeda who also directed the philosophical "After Life."

What if I were a 12 years old boy and left alone to take care of two younger sisters and one younger brother in a big city like Tokyo, and I have to hide them in the apartment so nobody knows about them? That's what I have been thinking when I was watching this film and how the film gets my sympathy for these children. It allows me to experience the ordeal through these children's eyes and the transcending performance by Yuya Yagira, who is the youngest actor ever won the best actor award in the history of Cannes Film Festival.

Director Koreeda allows the camera to take the time to shoot and he never rushes from one scene to the next. He let me observe, let me feel, let me be as close to these children as I possibly can, until I can no longer take it and until I am drowned by the frustration and sadness. I become as helpless as those children, because I simply can not resist the urge to help them. That makes me cry. Through out the film, Koreeda masterfully positioned his lenses to ordinary objects around these children, such as simply a finger, a hand, a stain, a foot, or four empty glasses. But through these zoomed in images, I have no trouble to "see" and "feel" what's going on in the whole picture. And it tells the story in a more profound fashion and more personal way, a story you will never forget, along with those images, sometimes, even the music.

The 12 years old boy is played by Yuya Yagira, who has a haircut like the Japanese animation character. Yagira's outstanding performance is original and remarkable, and simply unforgettable. Through him, you see a premature 12 years old boy who is acting as an adult to take care the other kids, meanwhile, he is still a 12 years old kid, who will just like other kids around his age. That's make this movie can be so hard to watch sometimes, because no matter how hard your heart is, it will be softened by watching his struggle to survive. It's hard to leave this movie with dry eyes.

There is no doubt in my mind that this is the best film I have seen this year.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

21 October 2004 (Hong Kong) See more »

Also Known As:

Nobody Knows See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$32,393, 6 February 2005

Gross USA:

$684,118

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,288,093
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente)

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

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