Tears of Kali (2004) - News Poster

(2004)

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First wave of horror films announced for Telluride Horror Show

by Seth Metoyer

MoreHorror.com

The first round of horror films have been announced for the Colorado based horror festival Telluride Horror Show. This years lineup looks sweet and includes premieres and a special screening of Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas with director Q&A! Check the list of films below.

From The Press Release

The first wave of films is now live for the 2015 Telluride Horror Show, October 16-18 in picturesque Telluride, Colorado (elevation 8,750 ft.).

Most of the films will make their Colorado premieres at this year's festival or will screen fresh off their Fantastic Fest debuts. The festival will also feature a special screening of Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas followed by a director Q&A.

Here's the complete lineup, which can also be found at http://telluridehorrorshow.com/films.html

Guests

Henry Selick

Guest Director

Henry Selick is an American stop-motion director, producer and writer
See full article at MoreHorror »

Round-Up: New Cavity Colors Shirts, Telluride Horror Show 2015, American Backwoods: Slew Hampshire Posters

  • DailyDead
Halloween is in less than two months, and Cavity Colors wants to help you get an early start on the festivities. Also: the lineup at the 2015 Telluride Horror Show and four posters from American Backwoods: Slew Hampshire.

Cavity Colors' Halloween Celebration Shirts: "'The Girl Who Dreams Of Halloween' Limited Edition Print ($30.00)

Lucy found herself constantly daydreaming about candy corn, jack-o-lanterns, and paper skeletons... 1 day a year was not enough.... The giant pumpkin hovered over her head constantly... There was no escape.

Limited Edition of 100 Signed and numbered by Aaron Cavitycolors 17 x 22 inches (will fit any 18 x 24 frame) Printed with Archival inks on Velvet Cotton Paper Please allow 1 - 2 days for shipping (each print is made to order)

"Xenofloss" T-Shirt / Tanktop ($25.00)

In space, no one can hear you eat Halloween candy. But if you're an alien, you should always floss! There's no time for cavities!

Designed by Hillary White. Pre-order
See full article at DailyDead »

Artsploitation Takes North America On Reel Suspects’ ‘German Angst’ (Exclusive)

Paris-based Reel Suspects has sold North American rights to non-stock horror triptych “German Angst” to Raymond Murray’s Artsploitation Films.

Described by Artsploitation as “mystical and disturbing,” triptych, which sees its North American premiere at Canada’s Fantasia Film Festival on July 18, will then continue its festival run. A DVD/Blu-ray and VOD release is scheduled for the first quarter of 2016

Sale marks continuing title-by-title Artsploitation-Reel Suspects biz, after Raymond Murray’s Artsploitation Films, a indie distributor specializing in unsettling art or genre film fare from around the world, bought Reel Suspects’ French genre auteur hit “Horsehead” and another arthouse-genre mix, sci-fi “Vanishing Waves,” which was helmed by Lithuania’s Katrina Buozyte and a Golden Melies and Austin Fantastic Fest best picture winner.

Fast consolidating as one of Europe’s leading genre companies, handling edgier titles from Europe and world cinema, Matteo Lovadina’s Reel Suspects’ will unleash three
See full article at Variety - Film News »

An Interview With All Directors Of German Angst! Marschall! Kosakowski! Buttgereit! Part 1!

The Berlin-based horror anthology German Angst was among the many world premieres this year at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, and all three of its directors were attending in person. The day after, I was lucky enough to get to talk with them about the film, and German horror in general. From left to right in the picture above, they are: Andreas Marschall (of Tears of Kali fame), Michal Kosakowski (of Zero Killed fame, who also has a producer credit), and Jörg Buttgereit (of Nekromantik fame). It became quite a conversation, so I've split the interview in two parts. In this first part, we discuss the film's world premiere, and some of the ideas behind it. Rest assured it is quite spoiler-free. TwitchFilm: Let me...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Artsploitation takes U.S. on Reel Suspects’ ‘Horsehead’ (Exclusive)

Artsploitation takes U.S. on Reel Suspects’ ‘Horsehead’ (Exclusive)
Matteo Lovadina’s Paris-based Reel Suspects has sold U.S rights to supernatural fantasy “Horsehead,” a French genre auteur fest hit, to Raymond Murray’s Artsploitation Films, a indie distributor specializing in unsettling art or genre film fare from around the world.

The sale comes as Reel Suspects’ “German Angst,” a horror triptych, has been selected for the Rotterdam Festival. Artsploitation aims to give “Horsehead” a limited theatrical release before its distribution on DVD and VOD.

A first feature from France’s Romain Basset, but shot in English, “Horsehead” has played many of the world’s top genre/fantasy fests, establishing its credentials among fanboys (and girls), including Austin’s Fantastic Fest, Spain’s Sitges, Mexico’s Morbido Fest, the Buenos Aires Rojo Sangre meet, and Germany’s Exground Filmfest.

From Starfix Productions – and associate produced by Lovadina – “Horsehead” has already been licensed by Reel Suspects to Canada (Black Fawn
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Isa of the Day: Matteo Lovadina of Reel Suspects

Our International Sales Agent (Isa) of the Day coverage has resumed for this year's Cannes Film Festival. We will feature successful, upcoming, innovative and trailblazing agents from around the world (during and after the festival) and cover the latest trends in sales and distribution. Beyond the numbers and deals, this segment will also share inspirational and unique stories of how these individuals have evolved and paved their way in the industry, and what they envision for the new waves in global cinema.

Matteo Lovadina is the founder and sole principal of Reel Suspects, a multi-faceted “all rights” distribution company based in Paris, France. He represents "feature films with a twist": films both from first-time and revered directors, including the genres of cult, classic, thriller, horror, fantasy, Lgbt and erotic. His background as a photographer inspires him to choose only the richest quality of cinematography for the Reel Suspects catalog. His aim is to share the most cinematic and innovative stories.

Matteo talks about his reasonably budgeted films, the first Reel Suspects co-productions, and gives realistic advice to first-time filmmakers who are looking for distribution:

When and how did you start Reel Suspects?

I started Reel Suspects in 2011, after ten years in the business as a sales agent. When I started the company, I really wanted to focus on young directors and films by true auteurs. We love independent cinema, and it is our passion to put amazing and visually stunning films into distribution. A twist can be a genre: it can be a very strong drama, or fantasy. We are currently selling some fantasy art house horror, as we did in the past; we always try to find good films that are not purely commercial. This year's selections at Cannes Film Festival reflect our work in numerous ways, and give the sign that we are going in the right direction. The second focus is cinematography; I am a big fan of images and colors. I love when the image speaks for itself. This helps buyers to identify our quality without question.

Where are your buyers?

Over the years, we have developed a wide range of titles that go from youth films to experimental dramas. We have never cared about the country of origin. Being a French company, we obviously carry French films, but we really focus on the entire world. We have films from the Us, Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, Australia, Lithuania, and a catalog of French and Spanish classics.

We like young talents, and are passionate to help their careers takeoff. Two years ago, we had a film called Aurora (Vanishing Waves), a glamorous and sophisticated sci-fi film by first time director Kristina Buozyte. It was a Lithuanian and French co-production, and was a worldwide success. It was selected for all the major international festivals, and won several awards including the “Meliès d’Or”, a sort of “Fantasy Film” award renowned in Europe and abroad. It sold to nearly 25 territories between Cannes and Toronto, and was the first Lithuanian film with a theatrical release in the U.S.

How are sales?

Sales are doing well because of our “twist”. Distributors in our network know what they can find when they come to Reel Suspects. They know they will not find the 20 million dollars films. However, they also know that they will find a carefully chosen, cost-effective selection of quality films that will attract the right audience. This helps our buyers to take smaller risks on reliable niches in film. Luckily, sales are good and constantly growing, even if the competition is hard. Our films are being distributed in many countries. The festival circuit loves us, because we are defending new producers and directors and they appreciate our taste. Germany, Australia, and Japan are big for us, but we really work worldwide.

What is your background?

I was previously in the music and photography worlds. When I realized the music business was dead, I finally made the move to film.

What are some of the challenges of being a young company on the market?

The industry has this thing of labeling people. During the first year of my company, I had an erotic film that was sold to many countries. Many buyers think that I still do erotic films, and I do not. It's a struggle to get identified when you launch your own company. When you have one film that really works, people think you only do that. This year in Cannes, we had two horror films, and I can see people six months from now saying, "Reel Suspects only carries horror films." It's frustrating to be categorized so quickly, and to convince people that we're more than what they assume.

Do you have advice for first time directors who are looking for distribution?

You have to think before you make the film, "Am I able to find a good balance between making a film that will have a commercial success, and making a film that will only travel the festival circuit?" I think this is an essential question that all directors and producers should answer before shooting. Balance is important. With the supremacy of digital shooting nowadays, the production value of your delivery is now essential. Mediocrity is now harder to defend, when digital postproduction can help a film to be finalized in the best conditions.

Please discuss some of the films from the Reel Suspects catalog.

I'm really excited for the market premiere of Cat & Mouse, a psychological drama by Maartje Seyferth & Victor Nieuwenhuijs. It's about a girl who is completely lost between her present and her past. It’s our first co-production. Our expectations are quite high, and we feel it will be equally successful in the commercial market and in the festival scene.

Fièvre (new title: Horsehead) is a French fantasy horror by Romain Basset that follows the story of a student that gets lost in her nightmares.

Wild in Blue, our Cannes best seller, is an intense Us indie that we recently acquired. It features the last performance of Karen Black, in a super graphic psychodrama about a psychopath who kills his girlfriends until he finds real love.

We also have the most anticipated German Angst, a portmanteau film that combines the work of three well-known horror genre directors: Jörg Buttgereit (Nekromantik), Andreas Marschall (Tears of Kali), and Michal Kosakowski (Zero Killed). It's a shocking horror film, which has already reached cult status with its large fan base.

Learn about the Reel Suspects catalog.

More About Reel Suspects:

Reel Suspects is a multi-faceted “all rights” distribution company, specialized in emerging filmmakers. Reel Suspects is devoted to bring a new cost-effective business model to its partners from all over the world, in the context of an international market changing forever towards new directions, and specialized niches constantly growing and evolving. Promoting films in a new and different way, with an eye on newcomers and focusing on innovative marketing approaches might be the final goals of Reel Suspects.

Extended from first-timers directors to revered cinema masters, the ever growing Reel Suspects‘ catalogue already presents some classic films from better-known directors, such as “Vivre sa Vie” by Jean-Luc Godard, “Une partie de campagne” by Jean Renoir, as well as the “Alain Robbe-Grillet Collection”, restored in HD and the “Chris Marker Collection”.
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Reel Suspects does genre biz

Reel Suspects does genre biz
Exclusive: German horror trilogy German Angst amongst titles sold.

French genre specialist Reel Suspects has been racking up sales on its genre slate.

It has sold German horror trilogy German Angst to Alamode Film / Pierrot Le Fou for Germany speaking Europe.

The portmanteau film combines the work of three well-known horror genre directors: Jörg Buttgereit (Nekromantik), Andreas Marschall (Tears of Kali) and Michal Kosakowski (Zero Killed).

‘It benefits from their large fan base that should help secure it success worldwide,” said Reel Suspects founding chief Matteo Lovadina.

Craig Goodwill’s Patch Town, which premiered at Palm Springs this year, has been picked up by Kino Lorber for Us and Raven Banner for Canada.

The award-winning comedic fairy revolves around an abandoned child who dreams of being reunited with his adopted mother after he is abandoned in a cabbage patch.

Silvio Nacucchi’s Beyond Lover, which was launched at Berlin, has been sold to Optimale for France and Ariztical
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Lots of German Angst on Display in this New Anthology

No, German Angst is not a Uwe Boll biopic, although that would seem pretty damned appropriate. What we have here, kids, is a new anthology film featuring the works of Jorg Buttgereit (Nekromantik, Der Todesking), Andreas Marchall (Tears of Kali, Masks), and Michael Kosakowoski (Zero Killed).

In 1920 Germany became the most influential production location for fantastic films. Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau’s Nosferatu, Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and The Hands of Orlac, Paul Wegener’s The Golem earned the German cinema the label The Demonic Screen (Lotte H. Eisner). German filmmakers told stories of the underworld beneath urban life, about the invasion of the subconscious. The frontiers between reality and dreams blurred and the fear of dark eros emerged. These masterpieces of German Expressionist cinema are the ancestors of the contemporary fantastic genre. Their influence is still felt in almost every modern film. With the Nazi dictatorship
See full article at Dread Central »

Indie Spotlight

We return with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes production details for the documentary, Why Horror?, trailers for Muck, House of Last Things, and Xmas Tales, details on a horror novel giveaway, reviews for The Facility and In the Woods, and much more:

“Why Horror?” Production Details: “Why Horror? is a documentary look at the psychology of horror around the world in order to understand why we love to be scared.

You either love it or hate it … but horror entertainment is truly a global phenomenon. If you’re reading this, chances are you count yourself among the millions of people who love it. We do!

This documentary aims to be the most comprehensive film ever assembled on the topic. We have an incredible line-up of horror experts on hand to talk. From legendary filmmakers to performers to authors,
See full article at DailyDead »

Kickstart This! Horror Anthology German Angst Featuring Jorg Buttegereit Needs A Push

While horror anthologies seem to be a dime a dozen these days, it isn't that often that one is able to wrangle a cult legend like Jorg Buttegereit into returning to the genre after a 20 year absence. German Angst has done just that, but it's not a done deal just yet.The producers of the film are looking for money to get the project on the move, and they've put together quite a convincing Kickstarter proposal. Buttegereit (Nekromantik, Schramm, Der Todesking) is joined by Andreas Marschall (Masks, Tears of Kali) and Michal Kosakowski (Zero Killed), both of whom are also big figures in the German genre film scene. Frankly, looking through the conceptual material and examples of actual footage shot, this thing looks like it...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Director Of Nekromantik Returns In Anthology Project German Angst

Notorious German cult filmmaker Jörg Buttgereit may not have appeared on screens a whole lot in recent years but he retains a place in the hearts of cult film fans around the globe as the director of notorious - and rightly so - extreme horror Nekromantik. And fans waiting for more from the director shouldn't have long to wait now, with the announcement of impending anthology project German Angst.Buttgereit, Andreas Marschall (Tears Of Kali, Masks), and Michal Kosakowski (Zero Killed) contribute to the three part project and if the first artwork is any indication it'll be typically not for the squeamish. Click on the image in the gallery below to enlarge....

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Sony Finds its Masks

Some quick distribution news has come in that Sony Pictures Home Entertainment has picked up the North American rights for Andreas Marschall's (Tears of Kali) impressive looking giallo film Masks. Check out the trailer and stills right here.

Synopsis:

The story follows Stella, an ambitious acting student, who’s been accepted to the mysterious "Mateusz Gdula" school. The founder of the school committed suicide when his very special training method got forbidden because of the deaths of several of his students in the '70s.

But when strange things start to happen in the abandoned wing of the school, Stella suspects that Gdula's method is still practiced. And she wants to participate at all costs...

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See full article at Dread Central »

11th Fantastic Films Weekend: Day 3 – Report

The third and final day of the Fantasy Film Weekend started and although I was tired there was plenty to look forward to. The first film would be Red Sonja, which was an easy one to start off with. I knew that the highlight of the day would of course be The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm and the Masks screen talk with Andreas Marschall. It was nice to know that the end was near of course as tiredness was starting to become normality and my brain needed some serious rest.

Red Sonja

Red Sonja is a film that can no way be called good, but it has it arguably has its place in cult history. Not many films would pair up Arnold Schwarzenegger and Brigitte Nielsen in a Conan the Barbarian setting but this is obviously what they were looking for. Conan is of course superior but to
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

“Masks” exclusive pics & comments

  • Fangoria
“Masks” exclusive pics & comments
Following the critical success of Amer, another European filmmaker, Tears Of Kali’s Andreas Marschall, is delving into the rich and bloody legacy of the Italian giallo. Masks (see previous item here), the German writer/director’s sophomore effort, follows a young woman’s descent into horror when she attends a private school for budding thespians. Marschall, a former Heavy Metal comic artist, LP cover illustrator and prolific music-video helmer, spoke with Fango about his new film and provided a few exclusive Masks images.
See full article at Fangoria »

Promo Trailer Debut - Giallo Tribute Film, Masks

I really can't even remember the last giallo film we watched that we actually enjoyed. Even Argento himself misfired with his latest attempt. One filmmaker seems to be on the right track, and if this new promo trailer is any indication of what's to come, we're in fine black-gloved hands.

Below you'll find the first stills and the trailer for Masks from filmmaker Andreas Marschall (Tears of Kali). It's pretty damned impressive. Look for more on this one we're sure very soon!

The story follows Stella, an ambitious acting student, who’s been accepted to the mysterious "Mateusz Gdula" school. The founder of the school committed suicide when his very special training method got forbidden because of the deaths of several of his students in the '70s.

But when strange things start to happen in the abandoned wing of the school, Stella suspects that Gdula's method is still practiced.
See full article at Dread Central »

Teaser Trailer for Andreas Marschall's Masks

A teaser trailer for Andreas Marschall's Masks hit the web a few days back. You can watch this love letter to the giallo films of the '70s below. Marschall previously helmed the 2004 effort Tears of Kali . His latest concerns an acting school with a dark past and a young woman goes there to study. Alas, weird things begin occurring in an abandoned wing of the school.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

Italian Action Hero Peter Martell Dies

Italian actor Peter Martell was featured in numerous Spaghetti Westerns and Euro-thrillers in the 1960s and 1970s. His films include Antonio Margheriti’s 1966 sci-fi film War Between the Planets (aka Planet on the Prowl), and Jess Franco’s 1970 witch-hunting horror film Night of the Blood Monster (1970) with Christopher Lee.

He was born Pietro Martellanza in Bolzano in 1938, and went to Rome in the early 1960s to work in films. He was featured in such movies as I Kill, You Kill (1965), The Cobra (1967), Mission Phantom (1967), Death Walks at Midnight (1972), and The Executioner (1976). His film career largely ended in the mid-1970s, though he had a small role in the 1986 juvenile science fiction film Momo. The 1999 documentary film Starring Peter Martell brought attention to the dire circumstances he had been in since the end of his film career. He returned to the screen as Dracula in Jess Franco’s horror spoof Killer Barbys vs.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

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