6.2/10
903
19 user 18 critic

The Sisters (2005)

R | | Drama | 26 June 2008 (Greece)
Trailer
1:51 | Trailer

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at Amazon

Based on Anton Chekov's "The Three Sisters" about siblings living in a college town who struggle with the death of their father and try to reconcile relationships in their own lives.

Writers:

Richard Alfieri (screenplay), Richard Alfieri (play) | 1 more credit »
4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Elizabeth Banks ... Nancy Pecket
Maria Bello ... Marcia Prior Glass
Erika Christensen ... Irene Prior
Steven Culp ... Dr. Harry Glass
Tony Goldwyn ... Vincent Antonelli
Mary Stuart Masterson ... Olga Prior
Eric McCormack ... Gary Sokol
Alessandro Nivola ... Andrew Prior
Chris O'Donnell ... David Turzin
Rip Torn ... Dr. Chebrin
Greg Foote Greg Foote ... August Prior
Carolyn S. Chambers Carolyn S. Chambers ... Female Customer (as Carolyn Chambers)
Ed Ragozzino Ed Ragozzino ... Minister
Barbara Bechtel Barbara Bechtel ... Nurse
Tegue DeLeon Tegue DeLeon ... Paramedic #1
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Storyline

Based on Anton Chekov's "The Three Sisters" about siblings living in a college town who struggle with the death of their father and try to reconcile relationships in their own lives.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Every family has its secrets

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 June 2008 (Greece) See more »

Also Known As:

A három nővér See more »

Filming Locations:

Cottage Grove, Oregon, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kelli Garner and Bryce Dallas Howard were considered for the role of Irene. See more »

Goofs

At 01:45:31 David is shown walking up to the upper level as Gary leaves. He then walks back down to make the toast with everyone else at 01:45:46-48. When Gary comes raging back in at 01:45:50 it is shown that David is on the upper level near the window without moving at all. Gary then attacks him and they crash out the window. See more »

Quotes

Marcia Prior Glass: Harry... Harry, if you want to withold approval, intimidate and give rewards or punishments... buy a dog.
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Connections

Version of The Three Sisters (1964) See more »

Soundtracks

Opus 39, Waltz #15
Written by Johannes Brahms
Performed by Victor Alexeeff
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User Reviews

 
Theatrical Bravura in Contemporary Chekhov Update Makes for Uneven Viewing Experience
23 June 2006 | by EUyeshimaSee all my reviews

When I think about it, there have been quite a few cinematic variations on Anton Chekhov's classic "The Three Sisters" from Woody Allen's austere "Interiors" to Diane Keaton's execrable "Hanging Up". Playwright-turned-screenwriter Richard Alfieri provides a more literal adaptation by updating the original play to the present and resetting it primarily in a Manhattan faculty lounge on the Upper West Side. Longtime TV director Arthur Allan Seidelman guides an impressive ensemble of actors in the proceedings, but the result unfortunately feels like a stagy TV-movie brimming with overripe theatrics. The abundance of characters and multi-layered set-up seem to make the actors chew the scenery excessively, though a few still make indelible impressions.

The structure and themes of the Chekhov play remain the same. The plot focuses on the four Prior siblings - Marcia, Olga, Irene and Andrew - and their clashing destinies and unraveling secrets furnish the drama as they get together for Irene's 22nd birthday party. Maria is the beautiful, vitriolic older sister unhappily married to a passive psychology professor while embarking on a torrid affair with Vincent, their father's former teaching assistant who has come unexpectedly for a visit. Irene is the buttoned-up middle sister, an English literature professor and by default the family conciliator. Irene is the protected baby sister whose sunny disposition masks deeper insecurities that lead to a crystal-meth overdose. Andrew is the weak, emasculated brother who has brought home Nancy, his slatternly fiancée, whom his sisters, especially Marcia, despise. There are others who encircle the family like a vise with their own histrionics - kindly department head Dr. Chebrin and dueling professors Gary Sokol and David Turzin, both in love with Irene and seething with rage against each other.

There are plenty of fireworks, but with so many characters to track, Seidelman produces a truncated flow to the story while making the movie itself feel overlong. The performances are all over the map, though each seems to have at least one bravura set piece. As she proves in David Cronenberg's "A History of Violence", Maria Bello is one of the strongest actresses on screen today and makes Marcia a memorably fiery character, especially as she lays into the vulgar Nancy or succumbs to Vincent's ardent attention. As Irene, the underused Mary Stuart Masterson brings a coiled sense of repression that makes the contrast between her and Marcia biting and poignant. Less interesting is Erika Christensen, who makes Irene sweetly vulnerable but cannot transcend the trite arc of her character. Chris O'Donnell barely registers as the romantically obsessive David, but Eric McCormack - who will have a challenge overcoming his pervasive Will Truman persona - is all sarcastic blather as Gary until he manages to convey the character's pathetic jealousy.

Elizabeth Banks - memorable as the lusty bookstore clerk in "The 40-Year Old Virgin" - makes the vulgarity of Nancy palpable if rather obvious with a wavering Bronx accent, while Alessandro Nivola - equally memorable as the pampered rock star in "Laurel Canyon" - is effectively passive as Andrew. Tony Goldwyn seems oddly stilted as Vincent, making him a dispassionate match for Marcia's voracious self-destruction. At times, the dialogue is insightful with clever zingers. At other times, it sounds laughably mannered, and the general dysfunctional situation gets wearing over time. A few cathartic moments shine through, especially toward the end when Marcia and Olga come to terms with each other. The DVD is short on extras - just the original trailer and an overly earnest commentary from Seidelman and Alfieri.


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