5.5/10
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243 user 180 critic

Southland Tales (2006)

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ON DISC
During a three day heat wave just before a huge 4th of July celebration, an action star stricken with amnesia meets up with a porn star who is developing her own reality TV project, and a policeman who holds the key to a vast conspiracy.

Director:

Richard Kelly

Writer:

Richard Kelly
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Carlos Amezcua Carlos Amezcua ... Himself
Curtis Armstrong ... Dr. Soberin Exx
Robert Benz Robert Benz ... Tab Taverner
Todd Berger ... Bing Zinneman
Joe Campana ... Brandt Huntington
Chris Andrew Ciulla ... UPU 4 Officer 3 (as Chris Ciulla)
Rebekah Del Rio ... Vanessa Vera Cruz
Aaron Dillar Aaron Dillar ... Jimmy Hermosa
Nora Dunn ... Cyndi Pinziki
Shari Dunn Shari Dunn ... USI Dent Reporter
Michele Durrett Michele Durrett ... Starla Von Luft
Jon Falcone Jon Falcone ... Soldier Falcon
Leila Feinstein Leila Feinstein ... Herself
Jaret Gardiner Jaret Gardiner ... Shane Laverne
Janeane Garofalo ... General Teena MacArthur
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Storyline

Southland Tales is an ensemble piece set in the futuristic landscape of Los Angeles on July 4, 2008, as it stands on the brink of social, economic and environmental disaster. Boxer Santaros is an action star who's stricken with amnesia. His life intertwines with Krysta Now, an adult film star developing her own reality television project, and Ronald Taverner, a Hermosa Beach police officer who holds the key to a vast conspiracy. Written by TheGuyInThePj's

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This is the way the world ends-Not with a whimper, but with a bang. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, violence, sexual material and some drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

DVD site [Japan] | MySpace page

Country:

France | Germany | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 December 2007 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

A káosz birodalma See more »

Filming Locations:

Hermosa Beach, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$123,428, 18 November 2007, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$275,380, 20 December 2007

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$374,743, 29 June 2008
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

|

Sound Mix:

DTS | SDDS | Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

As of 2013, Richard Kelly still considers this his proudest accomplishment, calling it his "misunderstood child" See more »

Goofs

When Walter Mung throws the check back at Zora, it lands on the floor. As she leaves the truck, the check has somehow been placed on the counter (right side of the screen). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Private Pilot Abilene: [narration] In the aftermath of nuclear attacks in Texas, America found itself on the brink of anarchy.
[overlapping news reports]
Private Pilot Abilene: World War III had begun.
Private Pilot Abilene: The accelerated conflict in the Middle East placed significant restrictions on American access to oil. Alternative fuel sources became a lucrative commodity. Americans were transfixed by the terrorist's threat, and were willing to prevent another attack by any means necessary. Military checkpoints were erected at each State line. ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

After the credits, a logo appears of a thumbprint over an American flag with the words: "DON'T TOUCH ME" See more »

Alternate Versions

Originally running for 160 minutes, Southland Tales premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2006 to a disastrous reception. Because of this, it was re-edited and shortened in length as part of the distribution deal. Since the shortened version was shown theatrically and released on DVD, the Cannes cut has been shown on Cable TV and DVD releases in Europe. Some of the changes between the theatrical cut and the Cannes cut are as follows:
  • Opens the same as theatrical cut, with home video in Abilene, except with music ('Water Pistol' by Moby) and runs longer. Video is also shown in its original aspect ratio, instead of cropped for 2.35:1.
  • Doomsday Scenario Interface is not present in the original cut, it was added to provide background information present in the graphic novels. Instead we have narration from Pilot Abilene explaining the present situation and Treer Corporation.
  • The meeting between the Baron and Hideo Takehashi takes place much earlier in the film, Pilot explains the Baron dislikes Takehashi.
  • The character of General Teena MacArthur is more fleshed out in original cut, she mainly communicates with General Simon Theory and the Baron.
  • Many scenes with dialog between main characters have been extended i.e. scenes with Boxer & Roland, Krysta & Cyndi, Boxer & Starla, Cyndi & Vaughn Smallhouse etc.
  • Pilot explains that Bart Bookman is an 'angry man' with a willingness to die.
  • Some events that take place are better explained in original cut e.g. Boxer ringing Fortunio before meeting him, Serpentine explaining her actions at the end.
  • Features additional effects of the blimp not in theatrical version.
  • Features music by Moby not present in theatrical version i.e. 'Ceanograph' is heard in scene giving information on the rift, 'Hotel Intro' is heard as characters visit different sections on the blimp.
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Connections

Features Kiss Me Deadly (1955) See more »

Soundtracks

Teen Horniness Is Not a Crime
Written by Gerard Bauer, Colin Kelly and Richard Kelly
Performed by Sarah Michelle Gellar, Abbey McBride, Clarkent & Greasy Beats
Courtesy of Made Fresh While You Wait Music
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Karmic Fluid
5 September 2008 | by tedgSee all my reviews

I liked this enough to tell you in the first sentence that it would have been a candidate for one of only two 4-star ratings I give per year.

If you are an average viewer, you will be put off by the apparent narrative incoherence, the seeming lack of center and the childish nature of some of the devices. That's all fair enough. But let me point you to two things that make it for me.

The first is that it is inherently cinematic. It makes about as much sense when the sound is turned off. Indeed I watched the whole thing through this way once and it actually makes more sense. There's lots of cinematic nesting: movies about movies; videos, narratives and disguises within. There's lots of causality denoted visually. You will find scores of quotes from other films, many more than those "parody" teen movies. And you'll discover many of your favorite intelligent but not famous actors.

That would be enough for me, but there's something else. In fact, though the story is confusing, deliberately made so through how it unfolds, it does make complete sense. It makes as much sense as, say, "The Matrix." I wish it didn't, but there you are. But its the way the story slips about that is pretty wonderful. You see, a narrative works by the way the pieces connect.

Usually we don't have to work because the way the pieces connect is the way they happen in real life: the causal flow of the narrative telling is the same as in the story. But the detective story, and modern noir changed that and now we have a variety of causal connections that can glue the bits together. Even these you don't normally notice unless the writer — as here — makes the shifts between bits cover a greater distance than usual.

Pay attention to this. Greenaway uses reference to number sequence. Barney uses progress through the sexual encounter, clever that. Lynch provides these discontinuities by having characters shift selves — a technique of discovery. Joyce — who in a way is the gold standard because he reified this sort of art through cognitive plumbing connection — depends on notational congruence. All these are exciting as getout in the hands of their masters.

But this is different, more rooted in noir, in cinema. These elements are connected in ways that only read in film.

Here's what I mean: film has evolved a set of notions we call noir. These capture two worlds; the world of the story where the laws of the universe seem to be deliberately arranged by strange occurrences, "mistakes" and coincidences to play havoc with key characters. Then there is the (usually implied) second world where those laws are manipulated and we the viewers sit. In almost all noir films, this effect only occurs in the long form, meaning that it is apparent when seem over the whole story.

Now look here. For all intents, there is no long form here, just a sequence of medium- sized events, each of which contain rather than follow the previous ones. This form was pioneered (I believe) by Altman. The narrative glue of the whole is how the segments slip against one another. We have "Magnolia" that plays with this concept as well, this slipperage. Its the connection that conveys the world. Its subtle and homeopathically powerful as a result.

Now this. Its another step forward in that the connection between elements involves changes in the way the world works. Each shift is not just between story segments that don't make sense, they don't make sense BECAUSE of the nature of the transitions. Many of these transitions involve a change in the laws of the universe. Its as if you were playing chess as a chesspiece, and the rules of the game changed according to the patterns of the pieces on the board. The whole thing would make sense afterward when seem as a whole, but the chessmen will be baffled.

What this does is build an ordinary noir with the two worlds: story, and gods. But it cleverly puts the viewer on the chessboard as someone at the mercy of the rules. Its no accident that the inspiration is Philip K Dick (who invented this sort of reverse introspection), that the key magical plot device is the magically named "fluid karma," and that the mascot is Bai Ling, who was our Béatrice Dalle surrogate for a while.

I want to give this a four, but I do think that the two others from this year are more important.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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