8.5/10
18,966
71 user 15 critic

Black Friday (2004)

Not Rated | | Action, Crime, Drama | 9 February 2007 (India)
Trailer
2:08 | Trailer
A film about the investigations following the 1993 serial Bombay bomb blasts, told through the different stories of the people involved --police, conspirators, victims, middlemen.

Director:

Anurag Kashyap

Writers:

Anurag Kashyap (screenplay), Hussain Zaidi (book) | 1 more credit »
Top Rated Indian Movies #10 | 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Kay Kay Menon ... DCP Rakesh Maria
Pawan Malhotra ... Mushtaq 'Tiger' Memon
Aditya Srivastav ... Badshah Khan / Nasir Khan
Dibyendu Bhattacharya ... Yeda Yakub
Kishore Kadam ... Inspector Bhaskar Dangle
Gajraj Rao ... Dawood Phanse
Zakir Hussain ... Inspector Nand Kumar Chougale
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Somesh Agarwal Somesh Agarwal ... Abdul Rashid
Akhilesh Tripathi Akhilesh Tripathi ... Raju
Imtiaz Ali ... Yakub Memon
Raj Arjun ... Nasir Deklu
Ragesh Asthana Ragesh Asthana ... Mohammad Dossa
Sushovan Banerjee Sushovan Banerjee ... Abhay Zarapkar
Asif Basra ... Shanawaz Qureshi
Aditya Bhattacharya Aditya Bhattacharya ... Sheikh Aziz
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Storyline

A dramatic presentation of the bomb blasts that rocked Bombay on March 12, 1993, displays the police investigation, amidst allegations of human rights violations, led by DCP Rakesh Maria, in tracking down the suspects, especially Bashir Khan. Bashir managed to elude authorities by re-locating to Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Delhi, and West Bengal, after finally being apprehended in Bombay. His confession and subsequent flashbacks showcases the apathy shown by authorities who refused to intervene during the destruction of the sacred Babri Masjid by Hindu Kar Sevaks, and the inability of the police to fulfill their mandate and protect the vulnerable, forcing many to flee to other locations. The subsequent aftermath that succeeded in irreversibly polarizing communities in Bombay; Pakistan's involvement in training and arms' supplies; the main alleged suspects, Dawood Ibrahim, and Mushtaq Memon, sought refuge in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, while Indian politicians made a cosmetic move to ... Written by rAjOo (gunwanti@hotmail.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The story of the Bombay bomb blasts

Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama | History

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Anurag Kashyap stated "Mid Day had approached me through Arindam Mitra, who is the producer of the film. He wanted to make a television serial on it [the book], and asked me whether I would write it. When I read the book, I was very moved. It brought old memories of articles that I read in 1993. I was not in Mumbai when the blasts took place. I arrived here in June 1993. I suggested we make a film, instead of a serial. We discussed ideas and finally he gave me the idea for the final structure. I started writing the script, but got stuck. My team of Aparna Chaturvedi, Dr Tushar and Debashish Makhija did a year and a half of research and that's how the whole process started. We looked up photographs and documentaries. More than just destroyed buildings, I wanted to see personal losses, the pain, and show that to the audience. We also interviewed blast victims, and people who still work outside [the Bombay] Stock Exchange and passport offices [where the blasts occurred]. Kay Kay Menon plays Additional Commissioner of Police Rakesh Maria, who had put the case together and who handed over the case to former Mumbai police commissioner Amarjit Singh Samra, the man who solved the case with due help from other police departments. We followed his point of view, which led us to Badshah Khan, who plays a very important role. Aditya Srivastav, who was also in Paanch, plays him. Pawan Malhotra plays Tiger Memon and Vijay Maurya, who was also in Paanch, plays Dawood Ibrahim." See more »

Goofs

When the car enters BSE building, in the background, you can see the billboard of HSBC Mutual Fund, which was not launched in India in 1993. It entered India in 2002. See more »

Quotes

Badshah Khan: I want to go to Dubai!
Bashir Khan: But how'll you go without your Passsport?
Badshah Khan: Why? Anwar has everbody's Passports. Am I right Anwar? You have everybody's Passports, right?
Anwar Theba: I dont have anybody's Passport!
Badshah Khan: What? When we came back from Islamabad, you had kept everybody's Passports you crook!
Anwar Theba: Mind your language Badshah!
Badshah Khan: Okay, then where're the Passports?
Anwar Theba: I told you to maintain a civil language, Badshah! Don't you take that tone with me!
Badshah Khan: Alright, then tell me where are the Passports?
Anwar Theba: They're with Tiger bhai.
[...]
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Alternate Versions

17 seconds' worth of cockfighting scenes had to be deleted from the UK version. UK law does not allow any film footage of actual animal cruelty that was deliberately orchestrated by the film-makers. See more »

Connections

References Amar, Akbar and Anthony (1977) See more »

Soundtracks

Arey Ruk Ja Re Bandey
Lyrics by Piyush Mishra
Composed by Indian Ocean
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User Reviews

 
A rare foray by an Indian film maker into gritty real-life drama

Films based on books are a rarity in India. Probably that accounts for the huge amount of movies without any coherent screenplay that India churns out. Black Friday, on the other hand, is an exception, which will make any film maker proud.

The movie, revolving around the investigation following the horrifying Bombay bomb blasts, and also showing the perpetrators' lives just before and after the incident, took a long time to get through the Censor Board, and it's not difficult to imagine why once you have seen the movie. The movie tries to portray everything the way it actually happened, or at least as the book says it happened, and succeeds. Technically the movie is top league, compared to other Hindi movies, though the editing is choppy in places. The music, by Indian Ocean, is brilliant, and more importantly suits the plot. Despite the length of the movie the director never loses grip, and that's really commendable.

I haven't seen Satya (and I am sorry for that), so I am not very familiar with Anurag Kashyap's work (though he also did the dialogues, I believe, for Yuva, which I have seen), but considering the smoke he generates with every movie, I knew there had to be some fire to it too. And Black Friday IS fiery! The movie doesn't ever try to be politically correct and the director is almost obsessed with showing everything - even the correct language - which shall make it unsuitable for family viewing.

The actors, with Kay Kay (he should be getting awards for this one) and Aditya Srivastava worth special mention, do a very good job too, and I think many of them are of a theatre background, which ensures a high pedigree in Indian movies. Those familiar with Indian TV serials must have seen Srivastava in an eminently well-made series called 9 Malabar Hill from the late 90s, which also starred Pawan Malhotra. Srivastava has been seen in many other smaller roles in movies and TV serials since then, but that particular role had showed how good an actor he is, and it is proved here once more. Pawan Malhotra is also a known face in India's parallel cinema movement, though he is prone to overact at times. Kay Kay is one of the best actors to have hit the Indian screen in recent years, and brilliant performances aren't new to him.

The movie is unique in the sense that it shows the life of a terrorist AFTER the blast and how he copes with all the pressures. Then there's the pressure faced by the investigators to get to the terrorist, but taking care at the same time that they don't harm innocent people in their zeal. When I saw in the credits that the movie was based on a book by a Muslim author, I started feeling that it was going to be a biased description of the atrocities of Mumbai police on innocent members of the Musilm community during the investigations. Such a thought process is shameful, but natural in India's circumstances. But surprisingly, and thankfully, the movie, and so I suppose the book too, is as objective as it could have been without appearing sympathetic to either of the parties.

To finish off, this is one of those (very rare) movies that convince you that the future isn't all that bad for Hindi cinema. A must watch for all Hindi movie fans, and even those who normally don't watch Hindi movies because of the unrealistic gloss and song-and-dance routines.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

India

Language:

Hindi

Release Date:

9 February 2007 (India) See more »

Also Known As:

Black Friday See more »

Filming Locations:

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$25,000, 11 February 2007

Gross USA:

$35,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,610,897
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| | (Asian) | (TV cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital EX

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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