Face of Darkness (1976)

An MP arranges a bomb in a school playground as a pretext to bring back the death penalty.

Director:

Ian F.H. Lloyd

Writer:

Ian F.H. Lloyd (screenplay)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Lennard Pearce Lennard Pearce ... Edward Langdon
John Bennett ... Inquisitor / Psychiatrist
David Allister David Allister ... The Undead
Gwyneth Powell Gwyneth Powell ... Eileen
Roger Bizley Roger Bizley ... Peasant / Fish Porter
Jonathan Elsom Jonathan Elsom ... Philip
Susan Banahan Susan Banahan ... Angie
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Storyline

An MP arranges a bomb in a school playground as a pretext to bring back the death penalty.

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Genres:

Horror

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

November 1976 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Face of Darkness See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Cromdale Films See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
Disregarded, intelligent low-budget British Horror.
10 March 2007 | by chaplinpaduaSee all my reviews

The politician Langdon, played by Lennard Pearce ('Grandad' from 'Only Fools and Horses'), whose petulant face is well suited to the role, plans to commandeer a zombie, instruct it to bomb a school, manipulate the outrage, reinstate capital punishment and thus avenge his wife's murder. Perhaps not surprisingly, eldritch scenes ensue... Using an antique map and ancient text, Langdon locates and disinters the wooded unmarked grave of a medieval heretic. He then administers 'the kiss of life' to his subject in a very unsettling sequence. Later, his charge appears in Battersea, dapper in white polo neck and occult medallion, to perform a sinister and charming mime for the children...

The scenes during which David Allister (cast as 'The Undead') is psycho-analysed are a little too long, although not without humour. Some more time could have been taken with the editing, perhaps. The pure illogicality is very appealing.

Although this film is very far from being a run of the mill 'b movie', it came into the category of 'quota quickie' upon release mainly because of the running time, and was released as part of a double-bill with the Canadian film 'Death Weekend'.

Lovingly made in and around London,with vivid outdoor photography (maybe a necessity given the budget, but nonetheless beautiful), and a subtle, understated score by Martin Jacklin. This unusual and atmospheric film deserves to be made available.


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