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The Gardens Between Review

The passage of time is unrelenting, and often cruel. I’m not saying that to be emo or sad — that’s just how it is. Once something happens, it’s impossible to get it back. Unless, you’re in a video game, in which case time is just one obstacle. Such is the case with The Gardens Between, the creative new puzzler from The Voxel Agents. Known best for their Train Conductor franchise, their latest project represents a sizable change in direction for the Melbourne-based studio.

It can be difficult to describe exactly what The Gardens Between is. It’s a puzzle game that has you manipulating time in order to scale miniature gardens. Each of these little gardens is designed like a diorama, with details from Arina and Frendt, the two main characters, scattered throughout. Each member of the duo brings a skill to the adventure. Arina carries the
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Reel FX Rehires Jared Mass As Company Aims To Ramp Up Original Content Slate

Exclusive: Jared Mass has rejoined Reel FX Animation Studios after recently serving as Vice President at Paramount Animation. Mass, who worked as an executive during his initial stint at the company, will head up Reel FX’s Originals Unit as the organization looks to double down on its original content. In his new role, Mass will oversee a slate of animated feature films as well as a range of episodic, streaming, and cross-platform projects.

“Jared is a top-notch executive and producer whose sense of story, taste in material, and leadership qualities have always been impressive. We are thrilled to welcome Jared back home and look forward to him leading the charge on acquiring and producing our original IP,” said the Reel FX’s Chairman and CEO Steve O’Brien.

In an effort to achieve the aim for content growth, the company recently opened a large feature animation complex in Montreal
See full article at Deadline »

The 7 Best Movies New to Netflix in May 2018

It’s almost summer, and you know what that means: Some of last year’s best films are finally beginning to stream on Netflix! It means other things too, we suppose, but none of them could possibly be as important as the ability to watch Agnès Varda heart-bursting new documentary whenever the mood strikes (even die-hard defenders of the theatrical experience can appreciate the magic of being able to re-visit their favorite part of “Faces Places” anywhere they can find a cell phone signal).

Fingers crossed that the streaming giant will give a second life to the under-seen “God’s Own Country,” a beautiful 2017 release that never got the degree of attention — or the number of screens — that it deserved when it came stateside in October. These recent essentials highlight the strong crop of movies that are new on Netflix this month, as the service complements the best of 2017 with
See full article at Indiewire »

Netflix schedule: Here’s what is coming and leaving in May 2018

Netflix has confirmed that a slew of new original series will be debuting on the streaming service in May, including “The Break with Michelle Wolf,” who is fresh from her controversial stint as host of the White House correspondents dinner. There will also be new to Netflix seasons of some of your favorites from other networks, including the final episodes of “Scandal.” Likewise, there will be plenty of movies making their first Netflix appearances including the Oscar-winning “Coco.”

Of the new Netflix originals, several stand out as particularly binge-worthy, including the fourth season of “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” and the sophomore edition of the TV version of “Dear White People.” And there are two episodes of the new David Letterman talk show with guests Tina Fey and Howard Stern.

Television (New To Netflix)

May 1

Queens of Comedy: Season 1

Simon: Season 1

Yu-Gi-Oh! Arc-v: Season 2

May 3

Barbie Dreamhouse Adventures: Season 1

May 4

A Little
See full article at Gold Derby »

Movies New to Netflix in May: ‘Coco,’ ‘Hellboy II: The Golden Army,’ ‘Amélie,’ and More

Spring is in the air, and with it the sweet smell of fresh new Netflix movies. The streaming giant announced a slew of fresh content arriving to the site in May, and there is plenty to keep you entertained as the weather starts to turn. Though we have to wait almost the entire month, the most exciting addition is Disney/Pixar’s “Coco” on May 29. Fo those who missed it in theaters, the Oscar winner for Best Animated Feature will surely find a whole new audience once it’s available to stream.

Keeping up with this year’s Oscar winners, “Shape of Water” director Guillermo del Toro’s “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” arrives next month, as well as Agnès Varda’s Oscar nominated documentary “Faces Places.” Other standouts include intimate gay drama “God’s Own Country,” as well as “Amélie,” “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” and “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Strangers: Prey at Night’ Star Bailee Madison on the Long-Awaited Slasher Sequel

The Strangers are back in the long-awaited slasher sequel The Strangers: Prey at Night. For the sequel, the Strangers get a new director in 47 Meters Down helmer Johannes Roberts, a new cast, and an expanded playground. This time the slaughter heads to an empty trailer park resort, where a family in crisis stops in for the night and comes face-to-face with the murderous masked madmen. Bridge to Terabithia star Bailee Madison takes the lead as Kinsey, a bitter, isolated teenager about to be shipped off to boarding school. Along with her all-American brother (Lewis Pullman), …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Joins ‘Black Panther’ at the Top, But Grosses Continue To Fall

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Joins ‘Black Panther’ at the Top, But Grosses Continue To Fall
This weekend in history: Two films directed by African-Americans took the top two spots, for the first time ever. “Wrinkle,” directed by Ava DuVernay, is a rare film directed by a woman budgeted over $100 million. (Kathryn Bigelow’s “K-19: The Widowmaker” and Patty Jenkins’ “Wonder Woman” preceded it among non-animated films, but it’s the first from a black woman.

This breakthrough should not be diminished, but it’s only one of several important takeaways this weekend — not all so encouraging. We’re 10 weeks into 2018; last year at this point, five films had opened at $40 million or more. This year, there’s only “Black Panther” and its phenomenal success (it’s approaching $1.1 billion worldwide) may mask some significant issues.

Grosses are still up around 8 percent for the year so far, down from over 12 percent at the end of February That’s nothing compared to the likely drops in upcoming weeks,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Screenwriter Jennifer Lee Reveals Why a Classic Book Can’t Be Translated

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Screenwriter Jennifer Lee Reveals Why a Classic Book Can’t Be Translated
Jennifer Lee never expected to be this busy. She just flew in from previews on “Frozen: The Broadway Musical” (March 22) to promote “A Wrinkle in Time,” which she wrote after 2014 musical “Frozen” turned into the Oscar-winning, top-grossing worldwide animated blockbuster of all time.

She’s still writing the sequel to “Frozen,” too. “I was joking that if I have time, I have to write the climax for ‘Frozen 2’ for tomorrow morning,” said Lee. “It’s a Champagne problem, to have too much to do, when you love what you do.”

Lee wrote two animated features that grossed over $1 billion worldwide: She was on the Oscar-winning “Zootopia” writing team with college chum Phil Johnston, as she was on “Wreck-It-Ralph.” But after she and director Chris Buck wrote “Frozen,” Disney asked her to be co-director, having found out that she trained to be a director at Columbia film school.

With “Frozen,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Screenwriter Jennifer Lee Reveals Why a Classic Book Can’t Be Translated

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Screenwriter Jennifer Lee Reveals Why a Classic Book Can’t Be Translated
Jennifer Lee never expected to be this busy. She just flew in from previews on “Frozen: The Broadway Musical” (March 22) to promote “A Wrinkle in Time,” which she wrote after 2014 musical “Frozen” turned into the Oscar-winning, top-grossing worldwide animated blockbuster of all time.

She’s still writing the sequel to “Frozen,” too. “I was joking that if I have time, I have to write the climax for ‘Frozen 2’ for tomorrow morning,” said Lee. “It’s a Champagne problem, to have too much to do, when you love what you do.”

Lee wrote two animated features that grossed over $1 billion worldwide: She was on the Oscar-winning “Zootopia” writing team with college chum Phil Johnston, as she was on “Wreck-It-Ralph.” But after she and director Chris Buck wrote “Frozen,” Disney asked her to be co-director, having found out that she trained to be a director at Columbia film school.

With “Frozen,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Film Review: Oprah Hitchhikes the Galaxy in Trippy Kiddie Treat

  • The Wrap
‘A Wrinkle in Time’ Film Review: Oprah Hitchhikes the Galaxy in Trippy Kiddie Treat
Awash in bold colors, bright patterns and ebullient kids, director Ava DuVernay’s new take on “A Wrinkle in Time” dazzles its way across time and space even if it doesn’t quite stick the landing. A psychedelic journey for 6-year-olds of all ages, this big-screen adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s classic novel offers trippy delights without defying the novel’s “unfilmable” reputation. Still, DuVernay and screenwriters Jennifer Lee (“Frozen”) and John Stockwell (“Bridge to Terabithia”) give it their all, imbuing as much epic grandeur as they can into a story that seems to take place over the course of a languid afternoon. Audiences...
See full article at The Wrap »

A Wrinkle in Time Review: Disney's Latest Is a Colossal Disappointment

A Wrinkle in Time Review: Disney's Latest Is a Colossal Disappointment
Ava DuVernay's adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time is a colossal disappointment. The classic science fiction novel by Madeleine L'Engle has been turned into a sappy melodrama; utterly devoid of mystery or wonder. DuVernay's approach to the story is to emphasize its outcast element. The result is a fire hose of gushing positive reinforcement for the bullied, angst ridden protagonist. It reminded me of Al Franken's famous SNL skit, "Daily Affirmations with Stuart Smalley"; where he sits in front of a mirror saying, "You're good enough, you're smart enough, and doggone it, people like me". A Wrinkle in Time is essentially two hours of that, with Oprah Winfrey and special effects.

Storm Reid stars as Meg Murry, an awkward teenager who is constantly bullied at school. The source for her sorrow is the mysterious disappearance of her father (Chris Pine). He and her mother (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) were Nasa
See full article at MovieWeb »

A Wrinkle in Time Early Reviews: A Gorgeous & Well-Intentioned Mess

Read Screen Rant’s A Wrinkle in Time Review Here

The first reviews for Disney’s A Wrinkle in Time are now online. Directed by Selma‘s Ava DuVernay from a script by Frozen‘s Jennifer Lee and Bridge to Terabithia‘s Jeff Stockwell, A Wrinkle in Time is a live-action adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s iconic science fantasy novel of the same name that was first published in 1962.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Katherine Paterson Ya Works Getting Movie & TV Treatment From Arcady Bay & Meteor 17

Exclusive: Katherine Paterson, whose Ya books were the basis of movies including Bridge to Terabithia and The Great Gilly Hopkins, will see more of her works hit the big and small screens. Paterson’s production company Arcady Bay and Meteor 17 have inked an exclusive five-picture development deal for the IP. The projects will be adapted by screenwriter and Arcady Bay creative principal David Paterson, who co-wrote Terbithia and wrote Gilly Hopkins. The properties ID’d in…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Maggie Rose’s Steamy, Sexy Single Is About Her Love Life – and Her Husband Is ‘Very Flattered’

Maggie Rose’s Steamy, Sexy Single Is About Her Love Life – and Her Husband Is ‘Very Flattered’
Maggie Rose‘s new single, “Body on Fire” – and companion video debuting exclusively on People – leaves no room for misinterpretation. It’s about sex. Steamy, smoking-hot sex.

But is it autobiographical?

The 29-year-old artist chuckles. “Absolutely.”

Rose and her husband, Austin Marshall, who works in Nashville music management, were newlyweds when she and co-writer Chad Carlson set out to “write a song about completely giving yourself to another person,” she says.

While the lyrics could be sung by a man, it’s hard not to think they’re written from a feminine perspective – a rarity these days in country music.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Ottoman Lieutenant movie review: erasing the past with sleight of cinematic hand

MaryAnn’s quick take… Odious propagandistic attempt to enshrine Turkish denial of the Armenian genocide of World War I into cinematic history via a tepid and unconvincing romance. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

In a land on the brink of war,” goes the marketing tagline of the odious The Ottoman Lieutenant, “the most dangerous place to be is in love.” That would not be true in, shall we say, the best of wars, if there is such a thing. But here, young American nurse Lillie (Hera Hilmar: Anna Karenina), volunteering at a hospital in a remote region of the Ottoman Empire, finds herself in the middle of World War I and the genocide of Armenians by the Turks. Except the latter is not happening here at all! This propagandistic production, financed primarily from Turkey
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

World War Z Director Marc Forster To Helm Disney’s Live-Action Winnie The Pooh Movie

Disney’s latest film in a long list of live-action adaptations finally has a director. That’s right, Christopher Robin, a film based on A.A. Milne’s classic books Winnie the Pooh, has landed a director.

According to THR, the movie is set to be directed by Monster’s Ball, Finding Neverland, and World War Z helmer Marc Forster. Unlike most interpretations of the source material, this flick won’t focus as much on Pooh and the rest of the characters in the Hundred Acre Wood, but will instead focus on an adult Christopher Robin, who befriended the bunch as a kid.

I can already feel the waterworks coming on. Given that Pooh and his friends are stuffed animals, I can only imagine this movie will imbue themes of growing up, and by the end of it all, I’d be surprised if it wasn’t confirmed that everything was in Christopher Robin’s head.
See full article at LRM Online »

Michael Chapman Talks Restoring ‘Taxi Driver’ and the Problem with Modern Cinematography

Had he only worked for a period of roughly ten years, Michael Chapman would still be among the best-regarded cameramen of his time. How else to qualify the man who acted as operator on Klute, Husbands, The Landlord, The Godfather and Jaws, as well as cinematographer on The Last Detail, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Hardcore, The Last Waltz, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers? (The decades-blurring Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid is no small achievement, either.) But then he’d go on to helm All the Right Moves (a key early point in Tom Cruise’s career), then photographed (to name but a few) The Fugitive, Scorsese’s video for Michael Jackson’s “Bad,” and, of course, Space Jam. How many people in his trade can lay claim to that wide a berth?

Chapman’s been retired for nearly ten years — his last feature, Bridge to Terabithia, was released
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Great Gilly Hopkins movie review: a girl’s anger

A tough, simple story about a foster kid whose path to finding a family and a home is not an easy one. There are no platitudes here, just bittersweet truth. I’m “biast” (pro): desperate for movies about girls and women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Another beloved children’s novel by Katherine Paterson — she also wrote Bridge to Terabithia, which became a lovely and heartbreaking film a few years back — comes to the big screen… though mostly to the small one, because The Great Gilly Hopkins is being released on only a handful of screens; most fans of the book will have to catch it on VOD (or on DVD in a few months). For those not familiar with the book, it’s not about wizards and it’s not set in a postapocalyptic dystopia,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Raging Bull's Michael Chapman to receive Camerimage honour

  • ScreenDaily
Raging Bull's Michael Chapman to receive Camerimage honour
DoP behind Taxi Driver, The Lost Boys and Michael Jackson’s Bad to receive lifetime award.

Cinematographer Michael Chapman, two-time Oscar nominated for Raging Bull (1980) and The Fugative (1993), is to receive a lifetime achievement award at Camerimage.

The 24th International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography will be held in Bydgoszcz, Poland from Nov 12-19.

When he retired from filmmaking in 2006, Chapman’s left a legacy of more than four decades of film images places him among the elite of Us cinematographers.

Born near Boston in 1935, Chapman’s most important partnerships was with Us director Martin Scorsese, his collaborator on several film projects.

A few years before Raging Bull, they had made Taxi Driver. During the second half of the 1970s, Chapman also worked on Scorsese documentaries The Last Waltz and American Boy: A Profile of Steven Prince.

After making his directorial debut in 1983 with All the Right Moves - starring a then unknown [link=nm
See full article at ScreenDaily »

[in]Transition: where action meets academia

Get past the pretentious preamble, and this film journal illuminates the big-screen

The world of film academia can often seem remote – as divorced from mainstream film culture as the magical forest kingdom of Terabithia is from human society in the classic 1977 children’s book Bridge To Terabithia, and its two film adaptations. And yet Terabithia, as distant as it may seem, is in fact readily accessible to those willing to leave the safety of earthly civilisation behind and rope-swing across a creek to the magical treehouse beyond which it lies.

As it turns out, film academia is just as easy to access, only its rope swing is the blossoming medium of the video essay and its treehouse is [in]Transition, the world’s first peer-reviewed academic journal of “videographic film and moving image studies”. Don’t let the big words put you off: behind the scholarly jargon, [in]Transition is a treasure
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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