7.3/10
36,200
215 user 156 critic

North Country (2005)

Trailer
0:30 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
A fictionalized account of the first major successful sexual harassment case in the United States, Jenson vs. Eveleth Mines, where a woman who endured a range of abuse while working as a miner filed and won the landmark 1984 lawsuit.

Director:

Niki Caro

Writers:

Michael Seitzman (screenplay), Clara Bingham (book) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Charlize Theron ... Josey Aimes
Thomas Curtis Thomas Curtis ... Sammy Aimes
Elle Peterson ... Karen Aimes
Frances McDormand ... Glory
Sean Bean ... Kyle
Woody Harrelson ... Bill White
Jeremy Renner ... Bobby Sharp
Richard Jenkins ... Hank Aimes
Sissy Spacek ... Alice Aimes
James Cada James Cada ... Don Pearson
Rusty Schwimmer ... Big Betty
Linda Emond ... Leslie Conlin
Michelle Monaghan ... Sherry
Brad William Henke ... Lattavansky
Jillian Armenante ... Peg
Edit

Storyline

1989. Josey Aimes takes her two kids, Sammy and Karen, and leaves her abusive husband Wayne, to return to her northern Minnesota home town. On a chance meeting with her old friend Glory Dodge who works as a driver and union rep at the mine operated by Pearson Taconite and Steel, Josey decides to work at the mine as well, work that is dominated by men in number and in tone. She does so to be able to stand on her own two feet for the first time in her life, something she probably could not have done if she remained in a job washing hair at a beauty salon. Working at the mine does not sit well with her father, Hank Aimes, who also works at the mine and who, like the other male workers, believes she is taking a job away from a man. Hank has believed that all Josey's problems are of her own doing, ever since she, unmarried, had Sammy while she was still in high school. Josey has always stated that she does not know who Sammy's biological father is, which fosters Hank's attitude about her. ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

All She Wanted Was To Make A Living. Instead She Made History.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sequences involving sexual harassment including violence and dialogue, and for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 October 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Class Action See more »

Filming Locations:

Chisholm, Minnesota, USA See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$35,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,422,455, 23 October 2005, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$18,324,242, 8 January 2006
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Screenwriter Michael Seitzman didn't want any of the harassment or brutality to be fabricated. "If it happens on-screen, then it had to have happened to someone in real-life." See more »

Goofs

When Josey drives into Minneapolis, she is shown approaching downtown Minneapolis from the south. She should be approaching from the north. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Josey Aimes: [testifying] Lady, you sit in your nice house, clean floors, your bottled water, your flowers on Valentine's Day, and you think you're tough? Wear my shoes. Tell me tough. Work a day in the pit, tell me tough.
Lawyer: I'm sure we're all sufficiently impressed, Mrs. Aimes.
Josey Aimes: There's no "Mrs." here.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The Warner Bros. logo plays but with no music. See more »

Connections

Featured in The 78th Annual Academy Awards (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Noodles
Written by Matt Vorderbruggen
Performed by The Matt Vorderbruggen Band
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The Class Action.
18 July 2009 | by SpikeopathSee all my reviews

Josey Aimes (Charlize Theron) leaves her abusive husband and returns to her hometown in Northern Minnesota. After a prompt from her old friend Glory (Frances McDormand), Josey now a single mother with two children to support, seeks employment at the town iron mine plant. Predominantly employing men, Josey is expecting the work to be hard and gruelling, what she wasn't expecting tho is the mental and sexual harassment that the women and herself are expected to tolerate. Finally having enough, she starts to speak out about her treatment, but she finds that there are few allies both at work and at home. Her career, her life and her family are all sure to be affected as things reach breaking point.

North Country is inspired by the 2002 book Class Action: The Story of Lois Jenson, which details the landmark case of Jenson V Eveleth Taconite Company that changed the sexual harassment law.

There is always a danger in film land that serious, based on facts topics get too much of a Hollywood sheen. So shall it be with Niki Caro's (Whale Rider) interpretation of this most important part of American law. The impact is there, very much so, but in the need to keep the audience on board, one feels they are being force fed drama when really none was needed. Having a beauty like Charlize Theron playing your lead hardly helps cast off the glossy feel of the production. "Rightly" nominated for Best Actress (she has gusto in abundance), Theron is however miscast as regards the nature of the piece, her aura and star bank-ability his hard to ignore during the more dramatic moments. As the New York Times review noted on its release, "it's a star vehicle with heart," and it's impossible to argue with that astute summary.

Still there is much to enjoy here. In amongst the annoying contrivances put our way to further the emotional aspects, there beats a serious and dramatic heart. Coupled with a more than competently handled court case finale, and aided by McDormand's highly effective performance, North Country makes its valid point in spite of its obvious problems. Though the film didn't make back its budget of $30 million, it got people talking about the topic at its core. Putting the revolting issue of sexual harassment back in the public conscious can never be a bad thing, so with that, North Country achieved its aims. If it's as impacting as its cousins, Norma Rae, Silkwood and Erin Brockovich is debatable, but it is potent and it is acted with aplomb from its principals. It's just regrettable that one can't quite shake off knowing it's all a bit too glossy for its own good. 7/10


9 of 12 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 215 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Comedy Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular comedy titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed