9.1/10
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The Way Of The Warrior 

Sisko becomes uncomfortable when the Klingons station a task force to help defend against the Dominion. Worf is summoned to find out their true intentions.

Director:

James L. Conway

Writers:

Gene Roddenberry (based upon "Star Trek" created by), Rick Berman (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Avery Brooks ... Capt. Benjamin Sisko
Rene Auberjonois ... Odo
Michael Dorn ... Lt. Cmdr. Worf
Terry Farrell ... Lt. Cmdr. Jadzia Dax
Cirroc Lofton ... Jake Sisko (credit only)
Colm Meaney ... Chief Miles O'Brien
Armin Shimerman ... Quark
Alexander Siddig ... Doctor Bashir
Nana Visitor ... Major Kira
Penny Johnson Jerald ... Kasidy Yates (as Penny Johnson)
Marc Alaimo ... Gul Dukat
Robert O'Reilly ... Gowron
J.G. Hertzler ... Martok
Obi Ndefo ... Drex
Christopher Darga ... Kaybok
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Storyline

The crew of Deep Space Nine is preparing for a possible attack by the Dominion. There's a drill to find shapeshifters and the station is retrofitted. Suddenly, the massive Klingon flagship decloaks. It's General Martok and he's not alone. An entire Klingon fleet has been stationed nearby. Sisko welcomes them and Martok claims the fleet is at Deep Space Nine to fight with the Federation against the Dominion. Soon the trouble starts. The Klingons harass Morn, they beat up Garak and try to hijack Kasidy Yates' ship to look for shapeshifters. They continue checking ships outside of Bajoran space after. Sisko doesn't trust this anymore and asks the only Klingon in Starfleet, Worf, to find out what the Klingon fleet is really doing. Written by Arnoud Tiele (imdb@tiele.nl)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

At the end of season 3, the writers had planned on doing a "Changelings on Earth" storyline, which would end on a cliff-hanger. However, Paramount said that they didn't want a cliff-hanger ending, forcing the writers to go in a different direction. See more »

Goofs

While Worf is fighting the holographic alien in the training program on the holosuite, his mek'leth appears to be bent when seen from the rear of the alien, but straight when seen from the rear of Worf. See more »

Quotes

Martok: You robbed my son of his honor just to get my attention?
Lt. Commander Worf: You cannot take away what someone does not have.
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Alternate Versions

Originally aired as a double-length two-hour episode, "The Way of the Warrior" was cut into two parts for repeats and syndication. To make room for the credits sequence and a "previously on" segment in the second part, several scenes had to be cut. The DVD release contains the original long version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Apocalypse Rising (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Main Title
(uncredited)
Written by Dennis McCarthy
Performed by Dennis McCarthy
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User Reviews

 
Finally, a reward for loyal fans, and a treat for casual SF watchers
13 July 2016 | by lebedeff-27-786848See all my reviews

This double-length season opener does many things well, combining some of the best elements of old-school Trek with more contemporary action sci-fi. It seems to me like a resurrection of the series, a celebration, and in some ways a reconciliation with the loyal fans who were becoming disappointed in the franchise, but who decided to give DS9 another chance.

After a slew of boringly "skippable" episodes packing the end of the previous season, the rapid fire plot developments that fans get in this episode are refreshingly welcome. Of course, some "slow" Trek episodes are excellent too (a great example being the episode that follows this one), but fast, well-done *and* meaningful is worth embracing.

Firstly, so many things happen in this episode that it could be overwhelming; however, it's not, thanks to the writers' compression of the dialogues into pithy character-exposing vignettes and pithy exchanges. Garak (Andrew Robinson) and Gowron (Robert O'Reilly), in particular, elevate their zingers nearly to the point of camp, but they're darned entertaining. Political discussions are kept to relevant points, and they're over before they get dreary.

As for the action, there is more overall ass-kicking in this episode than perhaps in the previous three seasons combined. We can even foresee the re-thinking of action's role during the opening credits, in which the usually soporific score picks up a driving beat; the CGI artists add all sorts of things flying around, with little folks in space suits on the hull doing sparky things. As for the space battles in the episode, it seems like the CGI folks used up half a season's budget to make them happen. The station, for once, shows its teeth, and pretty much everyone gets to show off their hand-to-hand combat skills.

And this is why I mentioned old-school Trek: Klingons, phasers, and fisticuffs. Didn't Roddenberry envision Trek as sort of a space western? Well, there's a good, old showdown in this episode which many Trek fans have been waiting for since the 60s. And speaking of Klingons, there are mobs of them, and as part of an apparent re-invigoration of the series, (no spoilers) a fan favorite rejoins the franchise. As for lovable villains (it's not a spoiler to mention this guy), Gowron makes a spectacularly bug-eyed, "glorious" appearance.

The only minus that I could find in this episode, if I tried hard, would be that because of the pacing the characters come off as two-dimensional. In defense, however, for one, this is a season opener: for the sake of new viewers, a writer is often pressured to reintroduce every character in a quickly digestible manner. Secondly, this is Trek having fun, and the "speculative fiction," head-scratching aspect of Trek is traditionally all about the situations, not the characters.

A very satisfying episode for fans, and a totally decent watch for SF enthusiasts.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 October 1995 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Television See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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