7.0/10
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The Enterprise discovers a planet exactly like Earth, but the only inhabitants are children who contract a fatal disease upon entering puberty.

Director:

Vincent McEveety

Writers:

Adrian Spies, Gene Roddenberry (created by)
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
William Shatner ... Capt. Kirk
Leonard Nimoy ... Mr. Spock
Kim Darby ... Miri
Michael J. Pollard ... Jahn
DeForest Kelley ... Dr. McCoy
Grace Lee Whitney ... Yeoman Rand
Keith Taylor ... Jahn's Friend
Ed McCready Ed McCready ... Boy Creature
Kellie Flanagan Kellie Flanagan ... Blonde Girl
Stephen McEveety Stephen McEveety ... Redheaded Boy (as Steven McEveety)
David L. Ross ... Security Guard #1 (as David Ross)
Jim Goodwin ... Farrell
John Megna ... Little Boy
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Storyline

The Enterprise receives an old style SOS signal and finds on arrival a planet that is virtually identical to Earth. Kirk, Spock, McCoy and Yeoman Rand beam down to the planet only to find that it is inhabited solely by children. Kirk befriends one of the older children, Miri, but they soon learn that experiments to prolong life killed all of the adults and that the children will also die when they reach puberty. They also learn that the children are in fact, very old. Soon, the landing party contracts the virus and has seven days to find a cure. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the first episode to feature outdoor shooting after Star Trek: The Original Series: The Cage (1986), featuring the redressed exterior sets from The Andy Griffith Show (1960), which were located on the "40 Acres" backlot, property of Desilu studios at the time. Other episodes filmed at the "40 Acres" sets are Star Trek: The Original Series: The Return of the Archons (1967) and Star Trek: The Original Series: The City on the Edge of Forever (1967). See more »

Goofs

In the opening scene, where the ENTERPRISE orbits Miri's planet, you can see the hole at the top of the globe used for the original version of the scene where it would have been attached to its stand. This has been replaced in the remastered version with a digital shot of that same planet. See more »

Quotes

Dr. McCoy: A child entering puberty on this planet means a death sentence.
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Alternate Versions

Special Enhanced version Digitally Remastered with new exterior shots and remade opening theme song See more »

Connections

Referenced in South Park: The Wacky Molestation Adventure (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Theme
Music credited to Alexander Courage, although it strongly resembles the main title music for 'Hollow Triumph (1948)' by Sol Kaplan
Sung by Loulie Jean Norman
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User Reviews

 
An Earth Where Children Play Eternally - Almost
26 June 2006 | by BogmeisterSee all my reviews

The science fiction premise in this one is faulty - it's better suited for one of those parallel dimension stories or alternate histories. In another part of the galaxy, the Enterprise comes across another Earth; this is an exact duplicate of the Earth we know, except that on this one, in the 1960s, an artificially-created plague wiped out all adults, leaving children who age only a month for every 100 years. This begs a question: if no plague had occurred, would this Earth's civilization have progressed to form its own Starfleet and then the two Starfleets would run across each other and..? Of course, it's ludicrous and just an impossible set-up - an Earth with the exact same continents - the odds are probably trillions to one against.

The set design was pretty good for a TV series: Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Rand and two red-shirts beam down into the middle of a dilapidated city. So, we are to assume they weren't able to detect the still-lethal virus in the air; the landing party all contract the disease and are slated to die in a week, except Spock, who is a carrier and is stuck on the planet regardless. A bunch of kids scamper amid the ruins and cause some trouble by stealing the communicators. Kirk & McCoy start to swipe at each other in frustration as the deadline looms. I'm wondering if there is a correlation between no fatalities occurring during a Trek story and so-so episodes of the first season; there's some tension but a ho-hum tone by the end. With many of the characters being juveniles, there's too much 'bonk-bonk on the head' and repetitive-style silly dialog which was designed for children to verbalize.

These were early roles for Darby, playing the title character, and Pollard as the weird-looking main troublemaker with the strange name. She went on to "True Grit" in '69 and he to "Bonnie and Clyde" in '67. Darby was somewhat touching as the girl on the verge of womanhood, while Pollard...well, he applied some method acting but he seemed anywhere from 15 to 35 years old in his scenes; I couldn't decide on which. This episode was also probably the closest that Kirk and Rand came to admitting they had romantic feelings for each other. Rand (Whitney) was booted off the show soon after.


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Details

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Country:

USA

Language:

Greek | English

Release Date:

27 October 1966 (USA) See more »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

Mono | DTS (re-mastered version)| Dolby Digital (re-mastered version)

Color:

Color | Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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