7.6/10
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Final Performance 

Cliff is driving down a country road when a young girl, Rosie, flags him down and asks for a ride to Rawlins. He tells her that he is going to Hollywood, and she wants to go all the way. ... See full summary »

Director:

John Brahm

Writers:

Robert Bloch (story), Clyde Ware (teleplay)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Alfred Hitchcock ... Himself - Host
Franchot Tone ... Rudolph Bitzner
Sharon Farrell ... Rosie
Roger Perry ... Cliff Allen
Kelly Thordsen ... The Sheriff
William Challee ... Wint Davis
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Storyline

Cliff is driving down a country road when a young girl, Rosie, flags him down and asks for a ride to Rawlins. He tells her that he is going to Hollywood, and she wants to go all the way. Then they are stopped by a sheriff, who throws the book at Cliff. Cliff cannot restart his car, so it is towed to Mr. Davis' repair shop. Cliff takes a room at the nearby hotel and diner, run by Rudolph Bitzner, while he waits for his car. Rudolph shows his home to Cliff, which is filled with photographs from his career in vaudeville. Rudolph's only employee is Rosie, who pleads with Cliff to help her escape from Rudolph, who plans to marry her in one week, when she attains her eighteenth birthday. When the car is finally ready, Cliff comes to take Rosie away, but Rudolph says that she is rehearsing in the auditorium. As Rudolph and Rosie sit together on the stage, Cliff asks Rosie whether she wants to stay or leave for Hollywood. Rosie repeatedly insists that she wants to remain with Rudolph. After ... Written by Lewis Amack

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 January 1965 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

If the calendar on the wall is any indication, this was filmed in December, 1964. See more »

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User Reviews

 
flat adaptation
27 March 2013 | by HEFILMSee all my reviews

Overlong flatly made adaptation of Robert Bloch's much better story. F. Tone is very good as the aging performer but the lead girl, though sexy as the part requires, is too old and knowingly sexy to be believed as a young unworldly country gal. Many Hithcock hour long shows are memorably filmed and photographed but this one is dull looking. The ending of the story is probably too gruesome to have been done in 1960s TV but the way director John Brahm tries to stage it doesn't work. The rest of the direction is very flat this time around and must be considered a missed opportunity. Still if you haven't read the story the ending may have some impact. Best scene is the intentionally terrible stage act that the aging performer and his young gal hope will make them famous. The lead character is a writer driving across country to work in Hollywood, which is somewhat true to how Robert Bloch started his own LA career. So perhaps his move out there inspired the setting for the story. The episode doesn't feel padded but a shorter run time and being able to stick to the story for the ending would have helped. The episode is scored using music for other episodes which also leads to a feeling of "been there done that."


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