7.3/10
73,736
396 user 240 critic

Caché (2005)

A married couple is terrorized by a series of surveillance videotapes left on their front porch.

Director:

Michael Haneke

Writer:

Michael Haneke
Reviews
Popularity
4,080 ( 87)
29 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Daniel Auteuil ... Georges Laurent
Juliette Binoche ... Anne Laurent
Maurice Bénichou ... Majid
Annie Girardot ... Georges's Mom
Bernard Le Coq Bernard Le Coq ... Georges's Editor-In-Chief
Walid Afkir Walid Afkir ... Majid's Son
Lester Makedonsky Lester Makedonsky ... Pierrot Laurent
Daniel Duval ... Pierre
Nathalie Richard ... Mathilde
Denis Podalydès ... Yvon
Aïssa Maïga ... Chantal
Caroline Baehr Caroline Baehr ... Nurse
Christian Benedetti Christian Benedetti ... Georges's Father
Philippe Besson Philippe Besson ... TV Guest
Loic Brabant Loic Brabant ... Police Officer No. 2 (as Loïc Brabant)
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Storyline

Set in France, Georges is a TV Literary Reviewer and lives in a small yet modern town house with his wife Ann, a publisher and his young son Pierrot. They begin to receive video tapes through the post of their house and family, along side obscure child-like drawings. They visit the police with hope of aid to find the stalker, but as there is no direct threat, they refuse to help. As the tapes become more personal, Georges takes it upon himself to figure out who is putting through his family through such horror. A true Michael Haneke Classic. Written by Jodie Norton

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brief strong violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Voted "Best Film of the Noughties" by UK newspaper The Times. See more »

Goofs

In the opening scene we see the Laurent residence from a stationary camera. Three roses are visible in a window box on the left. In the same setting late in the film after much passage of time, the roses are unchanged and in the same positions. See more »

Quotes

Georges Laurent: Isn't it lonely, if you can't go out?
Georges's Mom: Why? Are you less lonely because you can sit in the garden? Do you feel less lonely in the metro than at home? Well then! Anyway, I have my family friend... with remote control. Whenever they annoy me, I just shut them up.
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Crazy Credits

Silent credits. See more »

Connections

References Two Brothers (2004) See more »

User Reviews

 
Reflective probing of hidden guilt, but definitely not top-notch cinema
13 December 2005 | by JuguAbrahamSee all my reviews

Michael Haneke's film begins as a clinical, psychological and social study of a respectable individual in European society. It ends as a study of a larger contemporary European segment of its population. It reminds one of the early works of Fassbinder—only Haneke's production values are more sophisticated. The camera becomes a character—a major one at that. This reminds the viewer that he is watching cinema at several junctures and that s/he is part of the communication/entertainment process. It makes you constantly ponder if the cinema you are watching is providing truth or lies (or something in between) 24 frames per second. The fixed-medium range shots that opens and closes the film indicate the view and mood of the director--clinical, somewhat distanced and unshaken by the story he unfolds. We also notice that what we are seeing, might not be what we think we are seeing. Antonioni did this to us in "Blow up" several decades ago.

After the screening at the on-going Dubai film festival, I was amused at the director carefully distancing himself from a situation where he could have resolved the issues—-he prefers to leave it to the viewer to do so. In a way the entertainment continues after the screening if you choose to reflect on what you saw.

At the obvious level, it is a study of colonial guilt of Europe and race relations. At a deeper level, it probes complacency and bourgeois temperaments of the financially secure classes in society. Escape from reality comes from closing curtains, shutting off the outside world and consuming sleeping tablets. At another level, the film explores the attitudes of three distinct generations towards social relationships.

Haneke uses graphic shocking violent scenes to jolt the audiences when they least expect it. He seems to enjoy the process. His strength is not in his cinema (Kubrick, in comparison, was brilliant at this game). Hanneke's strength lies elsewhere—eliciting fascinating performances from his cast. Daniel Auteuil, Julliette Binoche, Maurice Benichou and Annie Girardot were simply fascinating to watch.

The strength of the film lies in the subject that will disturb anyone. Many of us have something in our past that we wish to hide or not discuss. Yet there is a conscience in us that nags us to believe that there was a witness to that wrongdoing--a witness who cannot be buttonholed. It is this psychological fact that makes the film tick, much less its cinematic flourish.


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Details

Country:

France | Austria | Germany | Italy

Language:

French

Release Date:

17 February 2006 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Caché (Hidden) See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

EUR8,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$57,010, 25 December 2005

Gross USA:

$3,647,381

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$16,197,824
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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