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Bee Season (2005)

PG-13 | | Drama | 23 November 2005 (USA)
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A wife and mother begins a downward emotional spiral, as her husband avoids their collapsing marriage by immersing himself in his 11 year-old daughter's quest to become a spelling bee champion.

Writers:

Myla Goldberg (novel), Naomi Foner (screenplay) (as Naomi Foner Gyllenhaal)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Richard Gere ... Saul
Juliette Binoche ... Miriam
Flora Cross ... Eliza
Max Minghella ... Aaron
Kate Bosworth ... Chali
Corey Fischer ... National Spelling Bee Pronouncer
Sam Zuckerman Sam Zuckerman ... National Spelling Bee Judge
Joan Mankin Joan Mankin ... Ms. Bergermeyer
Piers Mackenzie Piers Mackenzie ... Dr. Morris
Lorri Holt Lorri Holt ... Ms. Rai
Brian Leonard Brian Leonard ... Mr. Julien
Jamal Thornes Jamal Thornes ... Wiseacre Boy's Mate
Kathy McGraw ... Regional Bee Pronouncer
John Evans ... Regional Bee Judge
Alisha Mullally ... Young Miriam
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Storyline

Living in Oakland, California, the Naumanns are outwardly a loving, supportive family. Husband and father Saul Naumann is a Religious Studies professor, and looks to his religious training in Judaism as tenets for his family to live. He has high expectations for all members of his family. His mid-teen son, Aaron Naumann, idolizes his father, and does whatever he can to please him. His pre-teen daughter, Eliza Naumann, often feels the neglected child. So when Saul eventually learns that Eliza is participating and excelling in spelling bees, she becomes the focus of his life as he believes that letters in the form of words will lead to answers to the universe. That change in focus to Eliza makes Aaron now feel the neglected one, he who strikes out quietly in his own way with the help of Chali, a young woman he meets. But the person who has felt the most pressure within Saul's way of life is his wife, Miriam Naumann, a microbiologist. She converted from Catholicism to Judaism when she ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Words may define us, but it's love that connects us. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements, a scene of sensuality and brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | Germany

Language:

English | Hebrew

Release Date:

23 November 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

La huella del silencio See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$120,544, 13 November 2005, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,180,560, 2 February 2006

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$3,251,789, 2 February 2006
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

SDDS | Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jonathan Murphy auditioned for the part of Aaron Naumann. See more »

Goofs

The license plates on the family Volvo are different on the front and back. The front license plate starts with a "4", the rear license plate starts with a "5". See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
National Spelling Bee Pronouncer: Number 14. Eliza Naumann, Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California. "Oppidan".
Eliza: "Oppidan".
[sighs]
Eliza: [narrating] My father told me once that words and letters hold all the secrets of the universe. That in there shapes and sounds, I could find everything and see beyond myself, to something special. Perfect. My father told me once that I could reach the ear of God.
See more »

Connections

References La Dolce Vita (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

Two Tickets to Paradise
Written by Eddie Money
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User Reviews

 
Unusual In Visually Conveying a Spirtual, Intellectual Family Drama
28 November 2005 | by noraleeSee all my reviews

"Bee Season" is much better than the trailer foretold and almost surmounts a central miscasting to re-interpret the strongest aspects of Myla Goldberg's novel, which my Fiction Book Club had thoroughly enjoyed discussing.

The film blends a family drama with two popular interests, the Kabbalah and spelling bees. Unfortunately, the gimmicky celebrity populism of the former is accentuated with the wincible casting of Richard Gere as the father who is supposed to be a Talmudic scholar with a dissertation on Jewish mysticism.

When he was shown giving a simplistic lecture at multicultural UC Berkeley on the theme of tikkun olam (repairing the world) that is echoed throughout the film, I felt the only way I could accept him in the role at all would be to assume he was a gentile intro to comparative religion teacher, even though he has lines denigrating Jews who chant Hebrew in synagogue without understanding the language and about inspiring his French Catholic wife to convert. He does put across well how the patriarch bullies the family emotionally and controls them with food, rigid standards and attention, like a more subtle Great Santini, but he lacks the pale intensity of the obsessed and just seems another NPR-listening, Bach-duet playing intellectual.

Until the involving climax, though, there are ironically very little Hebrew numbers as letters to guide the secrets of the universe in the movie when the dad takes his spelling wunderkind daughter under his wing to teach her the power of language, but it does lead to the most powerful scenes in the film of letting us see what's going on inside her head. Flora Cross in her debut is the anti-Dakota Fanning in absolutely convincing us that she is in thrall to a supernatural gift and that her kabbalistic studies, which are usually forbidden to young people for their psychological dangers, are opening her up to hidden reservoirs of perception. It is completely exceptional that special effects can be so extraordinary and important to an intellectual family story, but they are not only enchanting but demonstrative. Cross naturally communicates how she intuitively is in touch with a force that her father can only enthusiastically theorize and not quite capture himself.

The sharp editing is superb at clarifying cross-currents from the book, and perhaps making it much easier, perhaps a bit too simplistically, to see how each member of the family is seeking the face of God in their own way. The son, dark heart throb in the budding Max Minghella, is, as usual, seduced by a bland blonde shiksa, Kate Bosworth, though with an unusual rebellious religious twist that here seems natural to the Berkeley environment. But then his Jewish religious education seemed pretty random.

The editing and the special effects also marvelously contrast the paternal theme with the other fractured visual theme of the kaleidescope that the mother favors. While Naomi Foner Gyllenhaal's adaptation (and it's nice to see Maggie and Jake's mom's work again) makes the details of the mom's increasingly disturbed activities more incomprehensible than in the book, Juliette Binoche superbly adds a fragility and depth to the role beyond the novel and makes her heartbreakingly sympathetic.

The conclusion is more emotional, if more pat, than in the book, though some interpretation is still possible.

In making the intellectual visible, the film also uses library settings as an inner sanctum very warmly.

Nice to hear the band Ivy on the soundtrack and over the credits.


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