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The Legend of Zorro (2005)

Trailer
2:25 | Trailer
Despite trying to keep his swashbuckling to a minimum, a threat to California's pending statehood causes the adventure-loving Don Alejandro de la Vega and his wife, Elena, to take action.

Director:

Martin Campbell

Writers:

Roberto Orci (screenplay), Alex Kurtzman (screenplay) | 5 more credits »
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Popularity
2,806 ( 619)
2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alberto Reyes Alberto Reyes ... Brother Ignacio
Julio Oscar Mechoso ... Frey Felipe
Gustavo Sánchez Parra ... Guillermo Cortez
Adrian Alonso ... Joaquin de la Vega
Nick Chinlund ... Jacob McGivens
Giovanna Zacarías ... Blanca Cortez (as Giovanna Zacarias)
Carlos Cobos Carlos Cobos ... Tabulador
Antonio Banderas ... Don Alejandro de la Vega / Zorro
Michael Emerson ... Harrigan
Shuler Hensley ... Pike
Pedro Armendáriz Jr. ... Governor Riley (as Pedro Armendariz)
Mary Crosby ... Governor's Wife
Catherine Zeta-Jones ... Elena de la Vega
Mauricio Bonet Mauricio Bonet ... Don Verdugo
Fernando Becerril ... Don Diaz
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Storyline

In 1850--against the backdrop of political unrest, as the scheming Jacob McGivens tries to stop California from joining the Union--the mysterious black-caped masked swordsman, Alejandro de la Vega, aka Zorro, finds himself in an unavoidable predicament. Having spent almost a decade protecting his people and fighting injustice, Alejandro's wife, Elena, insists that he gives up the black mask, and become a true father to their eight-year-old son, Joaquin. However, when Elena leaves him for the French count, Armand, it becomes evident that the conceited aristocrat is up to no good. Can Zorro, the legendary defender of the innocent, save both his marriage and the country? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This Fall, adventure begins with a Z.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for sequences of violence/peril and action, language and a couple of suggestive moments | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The locomotive used on the train at the end was not actually capable of moving under its own power. The illusion of it pulling the train was created by alternately using an out-of-vision diesel locomotive to pull or push, a bluescreen set up next to the steam locomotive with passing scenery added later, or an about 1/8 scale operable model of the train. See more »

Goofs

Nitroglycerin was first synthesized by Italian chemist Arcanio Sobrero at the University of Turin in 1847 but Alfred Nobel was not issued a patent on 'blasting oil' until 1863 (13 years after the year the story is set in). Nobel was still blowing up his factories in Heleneborg, Sweden 1864 and Krummel, Germany 1865 trying to produce it commercially. Nitro wasn't introduced to California until 1866, the same year Nobel established the United States Blasting Oil company when the Central Pacific Railroad acquired three crates to blast the Summit tunnel through the Sierra Nevadas, a handling accident caused an explosion which destroyed the Wells Fargo office in San Francisco killing 15 people. See more »

Quotes

Ferroq: [after finding Joaquin spying] What are you doing here, kid?
Joaquin: Looking at two of the ugliest guys I've ever seen!
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Crazy Credits

The closing credits list Abraham Lincoln as "President Lincoln". Lincoln was serving his first term on the Illinois State Assembly at the time that the film is set. See more »

Connections

Featured in Troldspejlet: Episode #34.9 (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

California Dianas
Written and Produced by Eduardo Gamboa
Performed by Banda de Tlayacapan
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User Reviews

 
Decent follow up is at least old-school cool
30 October 2005 | by DocRedfieldSee all my reviews

As a more than passing fan of the Zorro movies that span the decades, I had been waiting since 1998 for a sequel to Martin Campbell's 'Mask of Zorro.' That movie took much (though not everything) of the best of the various Zorro films, serials, and series and then stole from other sources (such as Dumas 'Monte Cristo', etc) to concoct a sexy, swashbuckling action adventure that had great pacing and strengths, with high production values and actors. Mr. Campbell and those high standards at last return to the story begun, and we now follow our heroes and their son as California fights to join a struggling Union. Zorro's character is not quite so impulsive and cool as he once was, but simply comfortable and ultra-capable, while his wife Elena complains that the man behind the mask knows not who their son is growing up to be. None of these character 'upgrades' felt wrong to me; it was natural extensions of them from the first film, despite how adventurous Elena claims to still be (and for the most part isn't), but it does make the first act of this movie a bit tiresome after the initial (awesome) action sequence. This time, though, as the story and its many plot-points begin to move, the writers borrow heavily from Hitchcock to keep things interesting. It doesn't always work, as there's a lot going on but never QUITE coming perfectly, cohesively together, but ultimately it makes sense and spins a good yarn for the fighting to take over. Meanwhile the stunt coordinators take what has already been done in the best Zorro flicks and then go wild with it, giving us stunts and action of old-school-cool caliber, such as stage-coaches, leaps and horses jumping on to explosive-laden locomotives. Unfortunately there is not quite enough action, and while I do like the over-all story - with its subtle bits of murk and dirty grays underneath the battle of white and black hats - it doesn't actually pace perfectly, giving us bickering Vega family exploits and Zorro failures for a rather large portion of the picture. The sword fights are fewer and more far-between than I would have liked, sometimes degrading to fisticuffs instead of proper dicing, but then the explosions almost make up for it all. The humor is a bit silly, provided mostly by the horse(!!) and the sometimes-annoying kid, but the audience ate it up. The villains are good, if never entirely fleshed out, and the themes are handled well. It's the lag caused by the idea (which I never understood) that 'once a couple gets together they're not interesting anymore' that slows things. Regardless of my small issues, the movie DOES deliver as a Zorro film, (with a good ending, for certain) and while it doesn't completely live up to its predecessor, it is a worthy sequel - just not entirely the direction I would have gone.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Mexico

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

28 October 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Zorro Unmasked See more »

Filming Locations:

Mexico See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$75,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,328,506, 30 October 2005

Gross USA:

$46,464,023

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$142,400,065
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS (8 channels)| Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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