She Hate Me (2004) - News Poster

(2004)

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Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman Gets a Late Summer 2018 Release Date

Focus Features has announced that Academy Award winning director Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman will open in theaters later this summer on August 10, 2018 starring previously announced John David Washington, Adam Driver (Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Inside Llewyn Davis), Laura Harrier (Spider-Man: Homecoming), and Topher Grace (Traffic, Spider-Man 3).

From visionary director Spike Lee comes the provocative story based on Ron Stallworth's real life as Colorado Springs's first African-American police officer who went undercover to infiltrate the Ku Klux Klan. Unbelievably, Detective Stallworth (John David Washington) and his partner Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) penetrate the Kkk at its highest levels to thwart its attempt to take over the city. Produced by the team behind the Academy-Award&#174 winning Get Out, Spike Lee uses his trademark take-no-prisoner style and humor to tell this story often missing from the history books.

BlacKkKlansman is being produced by Sean McKittrick and Raymond Mansfield for QC Entertainment,
See full article at MovieWeb »

How Ossie Davis’ Children Are Celebrating What Would Have Been His 100th Birthday (Exclusive)

How Ossie Davis’ Children Are Celebrating What Would Have Been His 100th Birthday (Exclusive)
Ossie Davis’ children are inspiring a new wave of activists through their father’s legacy.

The film, television and Broadway actor, director, poet, playwright and civil rights activist who died in 2005 at the age of 87, would have celebrated his 100th birthday on Monday (Dec. 18). In honor of the centennial milestone, Nora Davis Day, Guy Davis and Dr. Hasna Muhammad Davis (the three children of Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee) are highlighting their father’s “contributions to the struggle.”

“We know that if Dad and Mom were around now, they would want to be a part of this discourse around civil rights. This renewed activism, the challenging of the status quo, and augmenting the voices that are truly marginalized,” Hasna told Et during a phone interview on Friday. “Since he’s not here, we do have this opportunity to include his and Mom's voices, so that we can help attribute and provide historical context, and encourage the vehicle
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Isiah Whitlock Jr.

Isiah Whitlock Jr. is an American actor who is best known for his role as Clay Davis in the HBO TV series “The Wire.” He portrays a corrupt state senator whom some fans love and others despise. He’s also made appearances in “Red Hook Summer,” “She Hate Me” and “Chi-Raq.” He has a unique sense of humor and this is part of his appeal to fans. He can be funny when he wants to be but when he’s not funny, he can be flat out scary. Whitlock has the ability to portray serious characters or funny ones and his talent

Five Things You Didn’t Know About Isiah Whitlock Jr.
See full article at TVovermind.com »

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker
I was curious to see how “The Birth of a Nation” — which I first saw at Sundance, where it drew two standing ovations and won the jury and audience prizes — would play for a real audience; in this case, at UCLA Extension’s fall screening series Sneak Previews.

As I watched the film again, I recognized the power of this handsomely mounted movie. Writer-director Nate Parker carefully crafted the (mostly) historically accurate story to show how, in 1831, the charismatic and educated slave Nat Turner (Parker) preached the gospel around his Virginia county, to the enrichment of his childhood playmate and master Samuel Turner (Armie Hammer), in order to placate the local restless slave population, many of them living under far worse conditions.

He witnessed horror after horror, including the brutal gang rape of his beloved wife (Aja Naomi King), which eventually sent him on a mission of righteous vengeance from the Lord.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker

‘The Birth of a Nation’ Producers Answer Questions About The Film’s Challenges, Including Nate Parker
I was curious to see how “The Birth of a Nation” — which I first saw at Sundance, where it drew two standing ovations and won the jury and audience prizes — would play for a real audience; in this case, at UCLA Extension’s fall screening series Sneak Previews.

As I watched the film again, I recognized the power of this handsomely mounted movie. Writer-director Nate Parker carefully crafted the (mostly) historically accurate story to show how, in 1831, the charismatic and educated slave Nat Turner (Parker) preached the gospel around his Virginia county, to the enrichment of his childhood playmate and master Samuel Turner (Armie Hammer), in order to placate the local restless slave population, many of them living under far worse conditions.

He witnessed horror after horror, including the brutal gang rape of his beloved wife (Aja Naomi King), which eventually sent him on a mission of righteous vengeance from the Lord.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Jaula de Oro’s’ Quemada-Diez Preps ‘Operacion Atlas’ (Exclusive)

‘Jaula de Oro’s’ Quemada-Diez Preps ‘Operacion Atlas’ (Exclusive)
Director of Guatemala-u.S. road movie-thriller “La jaula de oro” (The Golden Dream), a standout Latin American debut, Spain-born Mexican Diego Quemada-Diez is readying political thriller “Operacion Atlas” as he launches an Academy Award campaign for his first feature.

Winner of a Cannes Un Certain Talent Award, “Jaula” tracks three teens, one a young Tzxotzil native, from Guatemala across the length of Mexico as they dodge migration cops, clash with gangs and travel on train-tops to a white-knuckle climax on the U.S.-Mexico border.

After immigration, “Operacion Atlas” takes another hot-button issue: Civil resistance to multinational corporation development projects backed by local governments – hydroelectric dams, massive deforestation and various fossil-fuel programs (oil, mining, fracking) – which is a recurrent narrative throughout Latin America.

As he made his own shorts – such as American Film Institute graduation film “A Table is a Table” which won an Asc Best Cinematography award, Quemada-Diez
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Chi-raq | Review

Sexual Healing: Spike Lee’s New Joint Aims to Anoint

Provocateur Spike Lee continues to fling his ambition into surprising experimental formats and narratives. Following the box office failure of his 2008 war drama Miracle at St. Anna, Lee has branched out inventively, though his feature narrative products have not often received the same level of critical acclaim elicited by his early titles from the late 80s and early 90s when he was a lone representative of black independent cinema at the art house. After funding 2012’s Red Hook Summer out of pocket and controversially trawling Kickstarter for 2014’s Da Sweet Blood of Jesus (a remake of Bill Gunn’s 1973 classic Ganja & Hess), he’s back with his grandest platform in quite some time with Chi-raq, so named for the controversial moniker Chicago has earned due to the astronomical urban violence plaguing the metropolis’ South Side. Assembling an impressive cast, including
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Learning to Drive' – A Conversation with Director Isabel Coixet, and Actors Patricia Clarkson & Sarita Choudhury

I recently sat down with director Isabel Coixet, and actors Patricia Clarkson and Sarita Choudhury at the Crosby Hotel in New York City, to discuss their new film "Learning to Drive." The film, written by Sarah Kernochan, is based on the autobiographical New Yorker short story by Katha Pollit, a long-time political columnist for the Nation.

Wendy is a fiery Manhattan author whose husband has just left her for a younger woman; Darwan is a soft-spoken taxi driver from India on the verge of an arranged marriage. As Wendy sets out to reclaim her independence, she runs into a barrier common to many lifelong New Yorkers: she’s never learned to drive. When Wendy hires Darwan to teach her, her unraveling life and his calm restraint seem like an awkward fit. But as he shows her how to take control of the wheel, and she coaches him on how to impress a woman, their unlikely friendship awakens them to the joy, humor, and love in starting life anew.

My conversation began with Isabel Coixet and Sarita Choudhury

Isabel Coixet’s award-winning film credits include "Demaisiado viejo para morir joven," "Things I Never Told You,""My Life Without Me," "The Secret Life of Words," "Paris, je t’aime," "Elegy," "Map of the Sounds of Tokyo," "Yesterday Never Ends," "Another Me," "Nobody Wants the Night," as well as documentaries, including "Invisibles."

Currently, Sarita Choudhury can be seen on Showtime’s "Homeland." Her film credits include "Admission," "Gayby," "Midnight’s Children," "Generation Um…," "Entre Nos," "The Accidental Husband," "Lady in the Water," "The War Within," "Mississippi Masala," "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love," "She Hate Me," "Just a Kiss," "Wild West," "High Art," "The House of the Spirits," "Gloria," and "A Perfect Murder."

Susan Kouguell: Tell me about the process of how "Learning to Drive" came about.

Isabel Coixet: We started talking about making this film with Patricia and Ben Kingsley when we were making "Elegy" (directed by Coixet, starring Clarkson and Kingsley) and we got along very well and we wanted to make another film together. Patricia discovered the short story by Katha Pollit, and she gave it to me and I thought it was wonderful. And then we got the screenwriter Sarah Kernocha involved. The film is a comedy but not a classical comedy. It was a very difficult film to pitch because you know financiers and producers want something they can put in one box and you can’t with this film. It was a long process. It took nine years.

Some Words Unspoken and the Intimacy of the Camera

Isabel Coixet: There is always this romantic feeling underneath [subtext], I think there is that possibility. You have to be true to your words. If they are true, you will have to stick to your words.

Sarita Choudhury: That’s what happens with people you meet. No you were my inspiration don’t make me your inspiration.

Isabel Coixet: I love Henry James. There is a possibility of romance in the air. My romantic side is always excited when I see something like this.

Sarita Choudhury: I had so few words in the film. In a way, I kept the words because I had to know not to say them. For us the script -- the situational was also in the script; the languidness. It was because Isabel holds the camera. There was a pace created to it. When you’re acting you can feel where the camera is, but when the camera is at the end of Isabel’s hand and she’s moving it, it almost creates an intimacy between you and the camera, and you and the actor. There’s a pace you normally don’t get in film. You didn’t know when she was on your face; you had to keep acting like acting in the theatre.

On The Lack of Women Directors

Isabel Coixet: There are so many articles about it. I’m always afraid to play the victim, to complain too much. I know there is an inequity with men and women directors. This is an issue in the world. I always say, (Coixet smiles) we have to ask for more salary to make up for all these years and maybe if we ask for more they’ll give us the same as a man.

I want to put my words where my mouth is by producing female directors; they are amazing talented people. I’m producing three short films and a feature documentary. That’s what I do.

Sarita Choudhury: I just did a young woman’s short film; there is something about her that’s brilliant. I’ve done two short films. I can’t change the caste system and I can’t do the voluntary work I need to be doing. Film is no different from the world, like Isabel said. That’s our work, to get every woman involved. And if a man is brilliant, let him in too.

I then asked Patricia Clarkson about her involvement with "Learning to Drive."

Academy Award® nominee and Emmy Award-winning actress, Patricia Clarkson, has worked extensively in independent films. The National Board of Review and the National Society of Film Critics named her Best Supporting Actress of the Year for "Pieces of April" and "The Station Agent." Her many film credits include "The Maze Runner," "Last Weekend," "Friends With Benefits," "One Day," "Easy A," "Shutter Island," "Vicky Christina Barcelona," "Elegy," "No Reservations," "All the Kings’ Men," "Lars and the Real Girl, and "Good Night, and Good Luck."

Susan Kouguell: What attracted you to the project?

Patricia Clarkson: I loved the Katha Pollit story in The New Yorker; it serendipitously came to me. I love Wendy, I love this character. I was nine years younger at the time, but I still felt I knew her. I was relentless trying to get this film made with producer Dana Friedman. I found it an equal dose of funny and tragic. I liked the almost commedia dell'arte aspect; this absurd situation and finding the tragic comedy. A woman who is brilliant who lives a great life -- she has everything, but “forgets to look up,” and then meets a man who has experienced tragic loss. They have disparate worlds. I found it a quintessential New York story, but it’s also universal. It’s an independent film, but it’s not independently-minded.

Some Final Words

The disparate worlds about which Clarkson refers to in regard to her character, Wendy’s relationship with Darwan [Ben Kingsley] -- the life of a financially successful New Yorker compared to the immigrant’s struggle, was a thematic element that I further discussed with Coixet and Choudhury. As Choudhury said to me, Coixet’s visual choices of her character, such as the moment when she watches feet walk by her basement apartment window, feeling trapped, underscore the poignancy of this fish-out-of-water situation. Coixet captures these elements with a delicate balance of both drama and comedy.

It was an inspiring morning to speak with these three powerful and talented women, who are committed to sharing their knowledge with the next generation of female filmmakers.

Award-winning screenwriter and filmmaker, Susan Kouguell teaches screenwriting at Purchase College Suny, and presents international seminars on screenwriting and film. Author of Savvy Characters Sell Screenplays! and The Savvy Screenwriter, she is chairperson of Su-City Pictures East, LLC, a consulting company founded in 1990 where she works with writers, filmmakers, and executives worldwide. www.su-city-pictures.com, http://su-city-pictures.com/wpblog
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

Revisiting Spike Lee's Perplexing 'She Hate Me' on Its 11th Anniversary

Eleven rears ago this month, Spike Lee's polarizing "She Hate Me" opened in theaters in the USA. The specific release date was July 30, 2004, so I'm a week early in terms of its exact 11th anniversary date. But it gives you 1 week to catch up by re-watching the film and joining the conversation that this post might generate. There's plenty going on in "She Hate Me" that, as I recall, left me utterly confused and frustrated when I saw it 11 years ago, and still does today, despite such a stellar cast that, on paper, on any other project, would/should instantly draw one's attention, including the late Ossie Davis’ turn as a judge in really a...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Crush of the week: Kerry Washington

‘There is a thrilling core of steel in Kerry Washington. She radiates capability alongside ethereal beauty’

There are three options for my Halloween costume this year, and top of the list is Scandal’s Olivia Pope, played by Kerry Washington. Her ascent has been a cultural moment for some years now.

It was not always thus. I first saw her in 2001 teen movie Save The Last Dance, in which she played a tough but kind student single mother. That small role led to parts in bigger things (Spike Lee’s She Hate Me, a role in Oscar-winning Ray) and the big thing came in 2012, when she was cast in Shonda Rhimes’ megahit, Scandal.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Street Closure Plans For 87th Oscars; David Oyelowo, Chris Pratt, John Travolta and Kerry Washington To Present

Jennifer Aniston, Sienna Miller, David Oyelowo, Chris Pratt, John Travolta and Kerry Washington will be presenters at this year’s Oscars, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today.

Aniston has starred in such films as “Cake” (2014), “We’re the Millers” (2013), “Horrible Bosses” (2011), “Marley & Me” (2008) and “Bruce Almighty” (2003). She also starred in all ten seasons of “Friends,” for which she won the 2002 Emmy® Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.

Miller co-stars in “American Sniper” and “Foxcatcher,” both of which have garnered multiple Oscar nominations this year. She previously appeared in such features as “Factory Girl” (2006) and “Layer Cake” (2005). Her upcoming films include “High-Rise,” “Adam Jones” and “Lost City of Z.”

Oyelowo portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in this year’s Best Picture nominee “Selma.” His other recent feature credits include “A Most Violent Year” (2014), “Interstellar” (2014), “Lee DanielsThe Butler” (2013) and “Jack Reacher” (2012). He will next be
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Jennifer Aniston, Sienna Miller, David Oyelowo, Chris Pratt, John Travolta and Kerry Washington to present at 87th Oscars®

Jennifer Aniston, Sienna Miller, David Oyelowo, Chris Pratt, Chris Rock and John Travolta will be presenters at this year’s Oscars, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. The Oscars, hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, will air on Sunday, February 22, live on ABC. Aniston has starred in such films as “Cake” (2014), “We’re the Millers” (2013), “Horrible Bosses” (2011), “Marley & Me” (2008) and “Bruce Almighty” (2003). She also starred in all ten seasons of “Friends,” for which she won the 2002 Emmy® Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series. Miller co-stars in “American Sniper” and “Foxcatcher,” both of which have garnered multiple Oscar® nominations this year. She previously appeared in such features as “Factory Girl” (2006) and “Layer Cake” (2005). Her upcoming films include “High-Rise,” “Adam Jones” and “Lost City of Z.” Oyelowo portrayed Martin Luther King, Jr. in this year’s Best Picture nominee “Selma.” His other recent feature credits include “A Most Violent Year
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Anthony Mackie Races To Jesse Owens Biopic, But Won't Play Tune For Buddy Bolden Pic

We here at the Playlist have been firmly in the tank for Anthony Mackie since at least 2006’s “Half Nelson,” if not Spike Lee’s wildly uneven “She Hate Me,” so it’s nice to see Hollywood finally coming around and recognizing his talent. As “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” continues its victory lap – $708 million worldwide and counting – and Mackie’s charismatic Falcon continues to be seen the world over, we’ll bring you up-to-date on the actor’s latest moves. The journey of the Dan Pritzker-helmed “Bolden” is a long and winding one. The biopic focuses on a musician, Buddy Bolden, one of the key figures of early jazz. Not much is known about Bolden, who died in 1931” with his legend being his lasting legacy and no known recordings of his work exist. The film originally began shooting in 2007 with Mackie in the lead role before adjourning for two years until Pritzker – who,
See full article at The Playlist »

12-Day Spike Lee Retrospective Coming To BAMcinématek (NYC) June 29 - July 10 (Includes Rare Screening Of 'Joe’s Bed-Stuy Barbershop: We Cut Heads')

Just in time for the release of his mystery Kickstarter-funded joint, Da Sweet Blood Of Jesus, this summer, BAMcinématek in Brooklyn, New York will host a retrospective of Spike Lee's film, in a series titled "By Any Means Necessary: A Spike Lee Joints Retrospective" running from June 29 - July 10. It will probably be a good time for me to revisit my Spike Lee retro from a couple of years ago, during which I revisited what I called his *forgotten* films - essentially, those titles that rarely come up when conversations about favorite Spike Lee films are had - like Girl 6, She Hate Me, Bamboozled, and others.  I wonder if we'll ever see a Tyler Perry retrospective. He's directed about...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Fading Gigolo

Fading Gigolo

Directed by: John Turturro

Cast: John Turturro, Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Vanessa Paradis, Sofia Vergara

Running Time: 1 hr 30 mins

Rating: R

Release Date: May 2, 2014 (Chicago)

Plot: Fiorvate (Turturro) is pimped out by his friend Murray (Allen) when two women (Stone & Vergara) are interested in a threesome. Unexpectedly, Fiorvante falls for a reclusive widow (Paradis) who hasn’t been touched by a man since her husband died.

Who’S It For? Those who like seeing star-struck writer/directors sell their project’s souls to past influences.

Overall

An actor/writer/director once conceded that masturbation is “sex with someone I love.” Then what room does that leave for acting/writing/directing in a film in which your master played by Woody Allen sings your praises, and Sofia Vergara and Sharon Stone hype you up to be a stallion? And most importantly, where’s the comedy in that?

The masturbatory
See full article at Scorecard Review »

Chiwetel Ejiofor joins Hollywood elite

After parallel successes on stage and screen, the Londoner is being lauded as one of the greatest actors of his generation

However good they are, actors always need a defining role to transform them into a film star, and as the kidnap victim Solomon Northup in the Steve McQueen-directed 12 Years a Slave, Chiwetel Ejiofor has found his.

Always an impressive performer on screen – certainly since his breakthrough role as a refugee doctor opposite Audrey Tautou in 2002's Dirty Pretty Things – Ejiofor is now on the cusp of joining the global film-acting elite. He has already been the recipient of scores of year-end critics' awards for 12 Years a Slave, as well as Golden Globe and Bafta nominations – and the industry will view it a significant scandal if an Oscar nomination doesn't materialise on 16 January.

Northup is the central figure in McQueen's project to confront the Us with its slavery past.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Once Hollywood’s Best Kept Secret, Chiwetel Ejiofor Is Now a Name to Remember

Once Hollywood’s Best Kept Secret, Chiwetel Ejiofor Is Now a Name to Remember
Chiwetel Ejiofor has finally arrived. And the proof comes when he doesn’t — at least not immediately.

He is now 15 minutes late for his breakfast interview. The owner of the Beverly Hills cafe is anxiously awaiting the appearance of the actor, whose reservation was made in his name. “We’re trying really hard not to freak out,” she quietly confides to a journalist.

Ejiofor laughs good-naturedly when the story is relayed to him. He’s still not quite used to all the attention, but feels fortunate that people have responded so positively to his new film “12 Years a Slave,” for which he has collected top actor awards from several critics groups and nominations from SAG and the Golden Globes. His standout performance as the film’s lead character, Solomon Northup, a free man kidnapped and sold into slavery, is considered a surefire bet for an Oscar nom.

See Also: Chiwetel Ejiofor
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Spike Lee on Oldboy, America's violent history and the fine art of mouthing off

The director has never been short of opinions – so why has he become evasive when we catch up with him in Brooklyn?

With the interview over, Spike Lee finally opens up. For 40 minutes the film director has sat in a defensive crouch, with his arms folded and his legs crossed, parrying questions as though they were accusations. More evasive than abrasive, he insists that neither new technology, changes in his personal life or the way that he's perceived have any effect on him or his work. A couple of times he responds as though there was another interviewee in the room.

Asked a perfectly reasonable questions such as: "How does an independent filmmaker like yourself measure success?", he'd say: "It depends who you ask."

"Well I'm asking you," I keep pointing out, hoping, in vain, for a credible answer.

Lee is small, slender and stylish. He is dressed all in black – sneakers,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

10 Lost, Unmade & Possible Future Projects Of Spike Lee

You hardly need to be a daily reader of our humble blog (though if you're not, what's wrong with you?) to know that there are few filmmakers we are more eternally fascinated by than Spike Lee, despite, and let's be honest, often because of his predilection for pissing people off. Lee is an epochal figure even away from the feuds and the tiffs and the controversies; we will never forget just how awestruck we were when we first saw "Do the Right Thing" and went on to enjoy the fruits of the independent filmmaking scene that it pretty much revolutionized. If Lee had never made another film, he'd deserve our attention just for that. But of course, Lee has made other films, and if anything, the way he has subsequently swung wildly from near-genius ("The 25th Hour," "Malcolm X," "4 Little Girls") to what the what? ("Girl 6," "She Hate Me,
See full article at The Playlist »
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