A murder inside the Louvre, and clues in Da Vinci paintings, lead to the discovery of a religious mystery protected by a secret society for two thousand years, which could shake the foundations of Christianity.

Director:

Ron Howard

Writers:

Akiva Goldsman (screenplay), Dan Brown (novel)
Popularity
1,014 ( 259)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 8 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tom Hanks ... Robert Langdon
Audrey Tautou ... Sophie Neveu
Ian McKellen ... Sir Leigh Teabing
Jean Reno ... Captain Bezu Fache
Paul Bettany ... Silas
Alfred Molina ... Bishop Manuel Aringarosa
Jürgen Prochnow ... Andre Vernet
Jean-Yves Berteloot ... Remy Jean
Etienne Chicot ... Lt. Collet
Jean-Pierre Marielle ... Jacques Saunière
Marie-Françoise Audollent ... Sister Sandrine
Rita Davies ... Elegant Woman at Rosslyn
Francesco Carnelutti ... Prefect
Seth Gabel ... Michael
Shane Zaza ... Youth on Bus
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Storyline

Dan Brown's controversial best-selling novel about a powerful secret that's been kept under wraps for thousands of years comes to the screen in this suspense thriller from Director Ron Howard. The stately silence of Paris' Louvre museum is broken when one of the gallery's leading curators is found dead on the grounds, with strange symbols carved into his body and left around the spot where he died. Hoping to learn the significance of the symbols, police bring in Sophie Neveu (Audrey Tautou), a gifted cryptographer who is also the victim's granddaughter. Needing help, Sophie calls on Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks), a leading symbolized from the United States. As Sophie and Robert dig deeper into the case, they discover the victim's involvement in the Priory of Sion, a secret society whose members have been privy to forbidden knowledge dating back to the birth of Christianity. In their search, Sophie and Robert happen upon evidence that could lead to the final resting place of the Holy ...

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Seek the truth, seek the codes. See more »

Genres:

Mystery | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing images, violence, some nudity, thematic material, brief drug references and sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Thure Lindhardt had booked his first Hollywood movie part as Silas the Albino and for a long time, he was clearly the running favorite until, ultimately, he was discounted on the grounds that he "looked too young", and Ron Howard decided on Paul Bettany. However, Lindhardt later got a significant supporting role in "Angels & Demons (2009)." See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 4 mins) Leonardo Da Vinci's The Last Supper is referred to as a fresco. Leonardo painted The Last Supper on DRY and not wet plaster, so it is not a true fresco. Because a fresco cannot be modified as the artist works, Leonardo instead chose to seal the stone wall with a layer of pitch, gesso and mastic, then paint onto it with tempera. Because it is not a true fresco, it cannot be moved easily, and this fact has caused it much deterioration and damages over the years. Furthermore, as it has received so much restoration, it is impossible to read as much into the detail of the painting as the narrative implies, as the level of detail concerned is more restoration than Da Vinci's original. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Silas: Stop now. Tell me where it is.
[removes hood]
Silas: You and your brethren possess what is not rightfully yours.
Jacques Saunière: I... I don't know what you are talking about.
Silas: Is it a secret you will die for?
Jacques Saunière: Please.
Silas: As you wish.
[cocks gun]
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Crazy Credits

No opening credits are shown after the title of the movie. See more »

Alternate Versions

The film was originally shown to the UK censors in an unfinished form, with a temp score and sound mix. The BBFC advised Sony Pictures that sound levels during some acts of violence may be too impactful for the requested "12A" rating, so the film was likely to receive a 15 classification. When formally submitted, the final levels of sound effects on the completed soundtrack had reduced the strength of some acts of violence to an extent which made the film able to get a "12A" rating. See more »

Connections

Followed by Angels & Demons (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Secrets
Written by Flipper Dalton
Performed by Flipper Dalton, Libera Benedetti & Irina Björklund (as Irina Bjorklund)
Courtesy of Da Silva Entertainment
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User Reviews

A major disappointment......
17 May 2006 | by Screen-SpaceSee all my reviews

Screened overnight for Australian media.

Four words - wrong star, wrong director.

Hanks and Howards best work, both together or separately, have been when they embrace intrinsically American values in their films. All their most memorable movies have involved individuals overcoming hardship through an unshakable belief in love and courage, usually set against an outwardly US-centric interpretation of events. Think Apollo 13, Forrest Gump, Cinderella Man, Saving Private Ryan - all fine films, all centred on an American hero rising above their circumstance.

What is conspicuously absent from either man's resume is a European-set, religious-themed mystery thriller. Having sat through their arduous, laborious adaptation of Dan Brown's novel, I can now see why.

The plot is total bunkum - a hodgepodge of "what ifs" and "oh my god" moments spun on the ludicrous premise that Leonardo Da Vinci had some sort of insight into the life of Christ - but loopy story lines have not stopped many films from being enjoyable.

What makes The Da Vinci Code so deathly dull is the heavy-handed, oh-so-serious approach Howard applies to the material. Combining with his cinematographer to give the film a sleepy nocturnal feel (not so clever given the 150min running time), Howard's film is just a constant flow of expository clues that fail to create any tension or engender his leads with any human qualities. Even for those that haven't read the book, a couple of obligatory 'big twists' in the story are very obvious from early-on.

Hanks (looking more like Jim Belushi than ever) and McKellen blather on and on and on about knights and saints and symbols and God as if they were giving a lecture at some Ivy-league school for the supernatural; Audrey Tautou is lovely but has little to do in a role that is plot- not character-driven. Jean Reno ambles thru another of his token French cop parts (he was better in the Pink Panther); Paul Bettany's evil albino Silas at least got some audience reaction, though giggles and guffaws were probably not what he was hoping for.

Whatever sense of fun and excitement the book provided is fully-drained from this adaptation. Come credit time, I had the realisation that all this hokey, airport-novel religious hooey and B-movie plotting would've made for a great X-files episode in that series heyday. As the end-product of a publishing phenomenon and carrying the tag "Years Most-Anticipated", its a boring dud.


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Details

Country:

USA | Malta | France | UK

Language:

English | French | Latin | Spanish

Release Date:

19 May 2006 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Da Vinci Code See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$125,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$77,073,388, 21 May 2006

Gross USA:

$217,536,138

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$760,006,945
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended cut) | (extended)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS (8 channels)| Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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