5.8/10
272
7 user 2 critic

My Name Is Bach (2003)

Mein Name ist Bach (original title)
Composer Johann Sebastian Bach is introduced to King Frederick II of Prussia in 1747. The aging composer and the young monarch clash and a battle of egos ensues.

Director:

Reviews
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Vadim Glowna ... Johann Sebastian Bach
... Friedrich II. von Preußen (Frederick II of Prussia)
... Prinzessin Amalie
... Friedemann 'Frieder' Bach
... Emanuel Bach
Antje Westermann ... Johanna Bach
Detlev Buck ... Zollbeamter (customs-officer)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Michel Cassagne ... Voltaire
Patrice-Luc Doumeyrou ... Maupertuis
Bernard Liègme ... Lakai Stumm
Daniel Lommatzsch ... Stadtbote
Henning Peker ... Königsbote
... Medikus
Joachim Tomaschewsky ... Hofarzt
Gilles Tschudi ... Sekretär Goltz
Edit

Storyline

Composer Johann Sebastian Bach is introduced to King Frederick II of Prussia in 1747. The aging composer and the young monarch clash and a battle of egos ensues.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

claim in title | See All (1) »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

8 April 2004 (Germany)  »

Also Known As:

My Name Is Bach  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

In her conversation with Friedemann, Amalie says that she is only 17. The story takes place in 1747. The real Amalie was born in 1723, so she was in fact 24 years old. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
That melody
8 April 2007 | by See all my reviews

Frederick II the Great of Prussia had a court that glittered with great minds, yet life with this King was anything but idyllic. He seems to have behaved imperiously with everyone, even his sister Amalie (at one point he slams the piano lid down on her hand, a rather brutal way of making his wishes known). All the fun of this film comes from the stratagems worked out by Bach to avoid falling under the control of Frederick. The King leads Bach to his new pianoforte: Bach pronounces the instrument unsuited for his music, and not even in tune. Score one for the Leipzig master composer!... The royal theme, to be treated as a fugue with six voices, is played lovingly many times, as well as Friedemann's passionate yet empty-sounding piano works.

Vadim Glowna is very sly and moving as Bach, and Juergen Vogel does a terrific job as Frederick, the ruler with a lot of emotional issues. Anatole Taubman plays the lusty and dishonest Friedemann very well.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 7 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed