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The Merchant of Venice (2004)

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In 16th century Venice, when a merchant must default on a large loan from an abused Jewish moneylender for a friend with romantic ambitions, the bitterly vengeful creditor demands a gruesome payment instead.

Director:

Michael Radford

Writers:

William Shakespeare (play), Michael Radford (screenplay)
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 2 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Al Pacino ... Shylock
Jeremy Irons ... Antonio
Joseph Fiennes ... Bassanio
Lynn Collins ... Portia
Zuleikha Robinson ... Jessica
Kris Marshall ... Gratiano
Charlie Cox ... Lorenzo
Heather Goldenhersh ... Nerissa
Mackenzie Crook ... Launcelot Gobbo
John Sessions ... Salerio
Gregor Fisher ... Solanio
Ron Cook ... Old Gobbo
Allan Corduner ... Tubal
Anton Rodgers ... The Duke
David Harewood ... Prince of Morocco
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Storyline

Venice, 1596. Melancholy Antonio loves the youthful Bassanio, so when Bassanio asks for 3000 ducats, Antonio says yes before knowing it's to sue for the hand of Portia. His capital tied up in merchant ships at sea, Antonio must go to Shylock, a Jewish moneylender he reviles. Shylock wraps his grudge in kindness, offering a three-month loan at no interest, but if not repaid, Antonio will owe a pound of flesh. The Jew's daughter elopes with a Christian, whetting Shylock's hatred. While Bassanio's away wooing Portia, Antonio's ships founder, and Shylock demands his pound of flesh. With court assembled and a judgment due, Portia swings into action to save Bassanio's friend. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

MGM [UK] | Sony Pictures Classics | See more »

Country:

USA | Italy | Luxembourg | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 February 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice See more »

Filming Locations:

Thiene, Vicenza, Veneto, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£147,709 (United Kingdom), 5 December 2004, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$69,868, 2 January 2005, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$3,765,585

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$32,000,000, 6 May 2016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Michael Radford was required to cut the kiss between Antonio and Bassanio for the "Edited for Television" version of this film. See more »

Goofs

In a couple of occasions the name "Mexico" comes up. While Mexico was officially called "New Spain" while it was under Spanish rule (such as the time the movie is set in) in practice "New Spain" and "Mexico" were used interchangeably (hence why the colony directly north of New Spain was called New Mexico, for example). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Title Card: Intolerance of the Jews was a fact of 16th Century life even in Venice, the most powerful and liberal city state in Europe.
Title Card: By law the Jews were forced to live in the old walled foundry or 'Geto' area of the city. After sundown the gate was locked and guarded by Christians
Title Card: In the daytime any man leaving the ghetto had to wear a red hat to mark him as a Jew.
Man in Crowd: Usurer! Usurer!
Title Card: The Jews were forbidden to own property. So they practised usury, the lending of money at interest. This was ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Version of Whatever Next?: Episode #1.4 (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

Bassanio Opens The Casket
Harp: Siobhan Armstrong (as Siobhán Armstrong)
Violin by David Juritz
Cello: Josephine Knight, Nick Cooper, Richard Tunnicliffe, Sophie Harris
Psaltery: Harvey Brough
Published By Shylock Ltd. / EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
© 2004 Decca Music Group Limited
(p) Jocelyn Pook Ltd. /2004 Decca Music Group Limited
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A Powerful and Intelligent Adaptation
31 January 2005 | by RathkoSee all my reviews

The inherent problem with any staging of 'The Merchant of Venice' has never been the pseudo-controversial anti-Semitism, but the fact that there are two story lines wildly different in both tone and content; a frothy romantic comedy and a searing tragedy. While mixing genres was all the rage in the sixteenth century (and mocked by Shakespeare in Hamlet), it rarely fails to grate with modern audiences. As a result, most directors are forced to place an emphasis on one storyline at the expense of the other, and it is no surprise that the decision falls in the favour of Shylock.

Like so many of Shakespeare's great tragic heroes, Shylock continues to fascinate after 400 years because he is such a difficult and complex character. Pitiful, proud, angry, vengeful, weak, arrogant; his behaviour defies simply analysis and continues to be argued over. He is flawed not because he is a Jew, but because he is human. Rarely do modern screenwriters imbue their creations with such richly textured contradictions, and it is to everyone's benefit that we have Shakespeare to draw on for inspiration.

Shakespearean language is wild and rambling, saturated in multiple meanings, word play and metaphor. To be understood it must be wrangled and tamed by an actor with the strength and knowledge to do so. When an actor fails, the words pour forth in a torrent of incomprehensible words, but when he succeeds, the English language springs to life with an immediacy and vibrancy that takes your breath away. Al Pacino is one such actor, and here displays an incredible level of clarity and control that, were there any justice, would sweep every award in the offering. He meets the challenge of presenting Shylock head on, and delivers an extraordinarily subtle and nuanced performance. It would be a crime if we never got the opportunity to see what he does with King Lear.

The supporting cast is noteworthy. Jeremy Irons gives an original take on the familiar Antonio, presenting an older, quieter figure that displays the unsavoury contradictions between medieval chivalry and ugly prejudice of the time. Joseph Fiennes is a revelation as he matures beyond superficial eye-candy to actually inhabit a character for once. Lynn Collins is the only disappointment. Many of Shakespeare's women are underwritten and require an actor to really work hard to bring them to life, and Collins' Gwyneth Paltrow impersonation seems a little flat and unsuited to the darker tone that Radford is aiming for.

The design team must be acknowledged for creating a unique and thoroughly believable vision of Late Renaissance Venice. The city has not looked this ominous since 'Don't Look Now'. Taking full advantage of extant locations and natural light, the film has an appearance of authenticity that is greatly enhanced by the dark and timeworn costume design. All, again, are worthy of award recognition.

The financial backers of films such as this must be commended. With a budget of $30 million, they must go into such a venture in the full and certain knowledge that they will never make a profit, and yet they invest nonetheless. We can all be grateful for it, as the result is a remarkable adaptation that is sure to be a benchmark for many years to come.


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