Touching the Void (2003) - News Poster

News

Cannes Film Review: ‘Whitney’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Whitney’
“Whitney” is the second documentary about the life and death of Whitney Houston to come along in a year, and it’s also the second one that’s entrancingly well-done. Here’s the thing about Whitney Houston: She was so incandescent that if you sat through nine documentaries about her, you’d probably experience, each time, what I did during the early scenes of “Whitney” — the hope that somehow, this time, the beautiful enraptured young singer in front of you will find a way to defeat her demons, that they won’t drag her down, that the story will turn out different.

Because surely, it’s one of the most tragic — and, its way, inexplicable — downfalls in the history of American show business. Cocaine addiction, of course, is an insidious monster, but Houston, even after rehab, kept returning to it, as if she wanted to destroy herself. To see her life story is always,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sheffield Doc/Fest unveils 2018 MeetMarket projects

65 filmmaker teams from around the world will pitch to international and UK decision makers.

Sheffield Doc/Fest (June 7-12) has revealed the titles that will pitch for funding at the 14th edition of its MeetMarket initiative.

A total of 65 filmmaker teams from 20 countries will pitch to international and UK decision makers for research, development and production funding. Around 300 decision makers from 20 countries are expected with execs from YouTube, ESPN, Starz and The Financial Times.

At the Alternate Realities Market, which includes digital titles, a further 25 Vr and interactive projects will pitch in one-to-one meetings to a range of specialist decision makers.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Shooting Wraps On Ralph Fiennes’ Directorial Project ‘The White Crow’

Principal photography has now wrapped on Ralph FiennesThe White Crow, which has been shooting in locations across France, Russia, Croatia and Serbia since August. A new image has been released, featuring lead actor Oleg Ivenko as the legendary ballet star Rudolf Nureyev. Check it out below.

The White Crow was developed by BBC Films and Gabrielle Tana (The Duchess, Dancer, Philomena) who also produces with Carolyn Marks Blackwood through Magnolia Mae Productions together with Ralph Fiennes through Lonely Dragon Productions, and François Ivernel (The Queen, Slumdog Millionaire, The Iron Lady) through the French branch of his company, Montebello Productions. American artist and filmmaker Andrew Levitas (Lullaby, Georgetown, The Art of Getting By) is a producer and financier through his companies Metalwork Pictures and Rogue Black respectively.

Hanway Films is handling worldwide sales on the project. BBC Films, Hanway Films and The Fyzz Facility co-financed the film.

The White Crow
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Tiff Review: ‘The Mountain Between Us’ is a Serviceable Survival Story

Kate Winslet and Idris Elba are two formidable actors that exude immaculate on-screen presence. So having both co-star in a film that basically pits them alone for most of the runtime can lead one to assume we’d be in for something special. The Mountain Between Us, adapted from the book by Charles Martin, is not that special movie. The Hollywood debut of Palestinian director Hany Abu-Assad, who made Paradise Now and Omar, turns out to be surprisingly pedantic. Whereas the two aforementioned movies dealt with hefty, substance-driven subject matters, The Mountain Between Us is nothing more than a survival love story set in the far-reaching rocky mountains.

Winslet plays photojournalist Alex and Elba is neurologist Ben. They meet at Salt Lake City airport after their flight is cancelled. Much to their fortune — or lack thereof, it turns out — they meet a pilot (Beau Bridges) that flies them in his private chartered plane.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Wendi Deng-Produced Documentary Set for Theatrical Release in China

Wendi Deng-Produced Documentary Set for Theatrical Release in China
China's film market will soon be getting a welcome dash of diversity as Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang opens theatrically in the country on Sept. 22.

The critically lauded documentary, which world premiered at Sundance in 2016, traces the career of Cai Guo-Qiang, the internationally acclaimed China-born artist famous for his mystical use of fireworks.

Directed by Kevin Macdonald (Touching the Void) and produced by Wendi Deng, Bennett Miller (Moneyball) and Fisher Stevens (Before the Flood), the film was snapped up by Netflix after its premiere and has been available on the platform since last fall.<br...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

How ‘Penny Dreadful’ Makeup Artists Brought Gothic Characters to Life

How ‘Penny Dreadful’ Makeup Artists Brought Gothic Characters to Life
Nick Dudman and Sarita Allison have become a force to be reckoned with in the world of makeup design. The two have received their third collaborative Emmy nomination for their work on Showtime’s gothic horror show “Penny Dreadful.” Dudman served as the prosthetic makeup designer and Allison as prosthetic makeup artist.

Dudman, a 35-year industry veteran, says series creator John Logan “had a strong vision for the show,and he stuck to it.” He and Allison have worked extensively together, with credits including “Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace,” “The Mummy” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.”

Designing and producing prosthetics is tricky and delicate. “What’s great about working on ‘Penny Dreadful’ is that John Logan always wants to do things as practically as possible,” says Dudman.

CGI has “changed the way we do our jobs in a huge way,” he adds. “On a show like ‘Penny Dreadful,’ combining
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Princess Diana TV Film From PBS, Channel 4 Promises Never-Seen-Before Footage

A new documentary on Princess Diana from PBS and Britain’s Channel 4 will feature never-before-seen footage of the royal and style icon captured by her speech coach in the early 1990s.

“Diana: In Her Own Words” will go out on Channel 4 and PBS in their respective countries in August, ahead of the 20th anniversary of her death. It will center on videotapes of the princess recorded at Kensington Palace by her speech coach, Peter Settelen, as he helped her prepare to publicly present her account of her life and marriage to Prince Charles.

In the recordings, Diana reflects on her early life, her relationship with the Prince of Wales, and life in the public eye. The filmmakers say the tapes are the only known unmediated video ever recorded with Diana.

There is also footage of Diana rehearsing as she sought to reinvent her public persona and prepared to make the recordings for Andrew Morton’s
See full article at Variety - TV News »

My Cousin Rachel review: Dir. Roger Michell (2017)

My Cousin Rachel review: Roger Michell (Notting Hill, Enduring Love) directs Rachel Weisz and Sam Claflin in this new adaption of Daphne du Maurier’s 1950’s novel.

My Cousin Rachel review by Andrew Gaudion, June 2017.

My Cousin Rachel review

‘Is she? Isn’t she? Did she? Didn’t she? These are the opening lines to set the tone for the ambiguous nature of Roger Michell’s adaption of Daphne du Maurier’s 1950’s novel. The ambiguity as to the true nature and intention of the eponymous cousin Rachel (here played by Rachel Weisz) undoubtedly stirs interest from the off, and for anyone with an interest in du Maurier, this new adaption does offer a gorgeous painterly depiction of the text. But it too often fumbles along with the mystery, resulting in a new version that struggles to keep the candle aflame when standing in the company of both the original
See full article at The Hollywood News »

New to Streaming: ‘Paterson,’ ‘Julieta,’ ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Evolution (Lucile Hadžihalilovic)

Near the beginning of Evolution, there’s a shot that hangs underwater, showing a seemingly harmonious aquatic eco-system that’s glimpsed just long enough to create the sense of something that, while somewhat familiar, is distinctly outside the human world. This fleeting image though shows the promise of the film Evolution could’ve been. – Ethan V. (full review)

Where to Stream: Netflix

Fire at Sea and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Why Not a Documentary for Best Picture?

Why Not a Documentary for Best Picture?
Ava DuVernay’s “Selma” follow- up, “13th,” opened the New York Film Festival on Sept. 30 and immediately situated itself as one of the year’s best films. Why, then, is it a foregone conclusion that we won’t be talking about it in terms of best picture?

No documentary has ever received a nomination for Hollywood’s top prize, despite true landmarks of the form — like “Shoah” and “Hoop Dreams” (the latter controversially snubbed in the doc category as well) — making strong cases.

In 2013 and 2015, a pair of documentaries by Joshua Oppenheimer — “The Act of Killing” and “The Look of Silence” — topped many critical assessments of the years’ best cinema, but nobody expected noms for best picture. In 2005, “March of the Penguins” became a cultural event that did bang-up box office, but it couldn’t break out of the documentary feature category at the Oscars.

And talk about cultural events: A year earlier,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Netflix Releases The Trailer For Sky Ladder: The Art Of Cai Guo-qiang

The trailer for Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang, directed by Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland, Touching the Void, Academy Award®-winner One Day in September), was released by Netflix today. Originally acquired by Netflix at Sundance, Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang can be seen in select theaters and on Netflix on October 14, 2016 and will have a European premiere next week on October 6 at the London Film Festival.

Check out the trailer below.

Acclaimed filmmaker Kevin Macdonald has unfettered access to world-renowned artist, Cai Guo-Qiang, whose frequent use of gunpowder serves as both an ancestral homage and an acknowledgement of humanity's fleeting nature. Creating ambitious signature pieces on the largest imaginable scales, Cai's electrifying work often transcends physical permanence all while burning its philosophies into the audience's mind forever.

Told through the artist's own words and those of family, friends and vigilant observers, Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang
See full article at LRM Online »

The powerhouse: If talks to eOne about the distribution landscape in 2016

  • IF.com.au
eOne release The Girl on The Train in cinemas October 6.

Since its acquisition by eOne in 2011, Hopscotch-eOne Anz has become a global player. If speaks to three of the team — Jude Troy, eOne Anz.s Evp, TV Development and Acquisitions, Lucy Hill, eOne Anz.s Head of Acquisitions and Maeva Gatineau, Hopscotch Features. Senior Vice President of Production — about the restructure, the distribution game and the landscape in 2016. What are your roles at eOne?

Hill: I head up acquisitions for eOne Australia and New Zealand, which means that I coordinate for our team, which includes Jude as well as Troy Lum, Sandie Don, Jason Hernandez and Kata [Mandic]. We look at which films we want to buy, primarily for theatrical but also for our home entertainment platforms, the landscape for which is changing massively.

Troy: I joined in 2004 as a small partner at Hopscotch. Troy brought me in, [with] Sandie and Frank Cox at the time,
See full article at IF.com.au »

The Powerhouse: If talks to eOne about the distribution landscape in 2016

  • IF.com.au
eOne release The Girl on The Train in cinemas October 6.

Since its acquisition by eOne in 2011, Hopscotch-eOne Anz has become a global player. If speaks to three of the team — Jude Troy, eOne Anz.s Evp, TV Development and Acquisitions, Lucy Hill, eOne Anz.s Head of Acquisitions and Maeva Gatineau, Hopscotch Features. Senior Vice President of Production — about the restructure, the distribution game and the landscape in 2016. What are your roles at eOne?

Hill: I head up acquisitions for eOne Australia and New Zealand, which means that I coordinate for our team, which includes Jude as well as Troy Lum, Sandie Don, Jason Hernandez and Kata [Mandic]. We look at which films we want to buy, primarily for theatrical but also for our home entertainment platforms, the landscape for which is changing massively.

Troy: I joined in 2004 as a small partner at Hopscotch. Troy brought me in, [with] Sandie and Frank Cox at the time,
See full article at IF.com.au »

‘Trainspotting,’ ‘Simon Killer,’ ‘The Loneliest Planet’ & More Indies Headed to Hulu in July — See Our Curated List

‘Trainspotting,’ ‘Simon Killer,’ ‘The Loneliest Planet’ & More Indies Headed to Hulu in July — See Our Curated List
A great many shows and movies are coming to Hulu next month, some more notable than others. To skip the chaff and go straight to the wheat, allow us to collate and curate a selection of the most notable titles available to stream in July:

“48 Hours” and “Another 48 Hours”

“The Aviator”

Berberian Sound Studio

Broadway Danny Rose

The Brothers Bloom

“Devil’s Pass”

Dirty Wars

“Dirty Work”

“‘Don’t Look Now”

Escape From Alcatraz

Finding Neverland

Fish Tank

“Flashdance”

Gimme the Loot

“Glory”

Read More: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: Reed Morano To Direct Elisabeth Moss In The Hulu Series

“Hackers”

“Hunger”

The Hunt for Red October

“In the Loop”

“Jimmy P”

Liberal Arts

Like Someone in Love

The Loneliest Planet

Lonesome Jim

“Manderlay”

Me and You and Everyone We Know

Mommie Dearest

“Phoenix”

“Rosemary’s Baby”

Read More: ‘Transparent’ Ratings Lag Behind Rivals on Netflix & Hulu

“Sightseers”

Simon Killer
See full article at Indiewire »

BFI inks content deal with Chinese VOD giant

BFI inks content deal with Chinese VOD giant
iQIYI, which reports 10m subs, will host a curated selection of titles from the BFI London Film Festival.

The British Film Institute (BFI) has struck a commercial deal with China’s largest VOD platform iQIYI for the latter to carry a selection of films that have previously premiered at the BFI London Film Festival.

The titles are a mixture of UK independent and world cinema. Terms of the deal were not made available.

Curated into four categories – Growing Pains, Foreign Adventures, Family Anecdotes, Social Perspectives – the BFI has programmed 20 titles specifically for the new collection, including Michael Haneke’s Oscar-winning Amour, Carol Morley’s The Falling, and Haifaa Al-Mansour’s Wadjda.

The BFI negotiated rights to those 20 titles with sales agents, while the full line-up also includes a further 11 films that had previously struck deals to be on iQIYI but will now become a part of the collection, including Steve McQueen’s Oscar-winning 12 Years A Slave and [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The never-ending story: why are Oscar movies often so long?

At 156 minutes, The Revenant is a challenge. At 187 minutes, The Hateful Eight is only to be approached with full stomach and empty bladder. It’s time film-makers realised epic doesn’t have to mean eternal

The Revenant, Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Oscar-hunting epic, is a film that does many unique and wonderful things, but perhaps its greatest feat is how it manages to be simultaneously breathtaking and yawn-inducing.

Make no mistake: the film contains sensational moments. But at heart it’s a simple man-v-nature yarn that runs along much the same lines as Touching the Void, All Is Lost or Gravity. The difference is that the latter three all had the good sense to appreciate that nerve-shredding intensity tends to sag at around the 100-minute mark. The Revenant obliges us to sit watching Leonardo DiCaprio’s beard accumulate frost – as fine a sight as that is – for over two and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Sky Ladder: The Art of Cai Guo-Qiang’

The spectacular visual displays of the Chinese-born artist Cai Guo-Qiang — firecrackers igniting the perimeter of a massive installation, an army of pyrotechnic pixels bursting in unison over a desert landscape — lend an undeniably cinematic razzle-dazzle to “Sky Ladder.” Those eye-catching elements aside, Kevin Macdonald’s latest documentary is a slender but involving portrait of this internationally renowned figure, touching on how the difficulties of growing up and working in his home country have informed a style at once uniquely dynamic and deeply rooted in classic Eastern traditions. Sifting lightly through several decades of history, but tethered to the present day by Cai’s recent attempts to realize the soaringly ambitious project of the title, this diverting 76-minute profile should easily climb its way into theatrical and small-screen berths.

A brief prologue recounts how the Chinese discovered gunpowder while searching for an elixir that would grant them immortality — an irony that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

UK producer John Smithson to attend Aidc 2016

The Australian International Documentary Conference has confirmed that John Smithson - producer of Touching the Void, 127 Hours and Sherpa - will attend Aidc 2016.

Smithson will participate in a Feature Documentary Masterclass before a screening of Sherpa, which he will attend alongside director Jennifer Peedom and producer Bridget Ikin.

He will also co-present Keynote in Conversation: The Rise of the Superdoc with Phil Craig (Head of ABC Factual, 2012-2015).

Smithson is the co-founder of the UK production company Arrow Media and has produced Deep Water, The Falling Man, The Beckoning Silence and Thrilla in Manila among numerous other projects.

Aidc 2016 takes place at Acmi in Melbourne from February 28-March 2.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Interview: Jennifer Peedom talks Sherpa

David Opie sits down with director Jennifer Peedom to discuss Sherpa, an inspiring documentary that follows a climbing expedition from the often overlooked perspective of the Sherpa community. The film is currently having a successful run at film festivals worldwide, winning Best Documentary at the London Film Festival, and our four star review is available to read here…

David Opie: Congratulations on winning The Grierson Award for Best Documentary at the London Film Festival. Sherpa is an astonishing achievement. What aspect of the film are you most proud of?

Jennifer Peedom: I think it would have to be the response from the Sherpa community. We just screened Sherpa at the Kathmandu Film Festival over the weekend and I’ve received so many messages from them there. Also, the film has had limited screenings in L.A., New York and at various film festivals, where there’s always been this big Sherpa turn-out.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Top 50 modern movie documentaries

facebook

twitter

google+

50 fabulous documentary films, covering hard politics through to music, money and films that never were...

Thanks to streaming services such as Netflix, we’ve never had better access to documentaries. A whole new audience can discover that these real life stories are just as thrilling, entertaining, and incredible as the latest big-budget blockbuster. What’s more, they’re all true too. But with a new found glut of them comes the ever more impossible choice, what’s worth your time? Below is my pick of the 50 best modern feature length documentaries.

I’ve defined modern as being from 2000 onwards, which means some of the greatest documentaries ever made will not feature here. I’m looking at you Hoop Dreams.

50. McConkey (2013)

d. Rob Bruce, Scott Gaffney, Murray Wais, Steve Winter, David Zieff

Shane McConkey was an extreme skier and Base jumper who lived life on the edge, and very much to the full.
See full article at Den of Geek »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites