7.7/10
417,475
1,696 user 295 critic

Crash (2004)

Trailer
2:31 | Trailer
Los Angeles citizens with vastly separate lives collide in interweaving stories of race, loss and redemption.

Director:

Paul Haggis

Writers:

Paul Haggis (story), Paul Haggis (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Popularity
954 ( 118)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 64 wins & 112 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Karina Arroyave ... Elizabeth
Dato Bakhtadze Dato Bakhtadze ... Lucien
Sandra Bullock ... Jean
Don Cheadle ... Graham
Art Chudabala ... Ken Ho
Sean Cory ... Motorcycle Cop
Tony Danza ... Fred
Keith David ... Lt. Dixon
Loretta Devine ... Shaniqua
Matt Dillon ... Officer Ryan
Jennifer Esposito ... Ria
Ime Etuk ... Georgie (as Ime N. Etuk)
Eddie J. Fernandez ... Officer Gomez (as Eddie Fernandez)
William Fichtner ... Flanagan
Howard Fong ... Store Owner
Edit

Storyline

Over a thirty-six hour period in Los Angeles, a handful of disparate people's lives intertwine as they deal with the tense race relations that belie life in the city. Among the players are: the Caucasian district attorney, who uses race as a political card; his Caucasian wife, who, having recently been carjacked by two black men, believes that her stereotypical views of non-whites is justified and cannot be considered racism; the two black carjackers who use their race both to their advantage and as an excuse; partnered Caucasian police constables, one who is a racist and uses his authority to harass non-whites, and the other who hates his partner because of those racist views, but who may have the same underlying values in his subconscious; a black film director and his black wife, who believes her husband doesn't support their black background enough, especially in light of an incident with the racist white cop; partnered police detectives and sometimes lovers, one Hispanic female ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You think you know who you are. You have no idea. See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, sexual content and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In the years following the release of Crash (2004), director Paul Haggis admitted that his film did not deserve to win the Academy Award for Best Picture over the much-more acclaimed and respected Brokeback Mountain (2005). See more »

Goofs

When Officers Ryan and Hanson pull Cameron and Christine over, Officer Hanson turns his light on while still in the car. When they are out of the car, his light is off, but in a later shot the light is on again. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Graham: It's the sense of touch. In any real city, you walk, you know? You brush past people, people bump into you. In L.A., nobody touches you. We're always behind this metal and glass. I think we miss that touch so much, that we crash into each other, just so we can feel something.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The film's title isn't shown until all of the opening credits are completed. See more »

Alternate Versions

The two-disc director's cut DVD features an additional two minutes of dialogue and footage See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Jay Leno Show: Episode #1.27 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Problems
Performed by Move.meant
Written by Move.meant
Published by O Natty Music & Meant To Move
Used Courtesy of Wax Paper Records
See more »

User Reviews

 
Roller-coaster of emotions
1 May 2005 | by VitaraiSee all my reviews

Like Altman's classic Short Cuts, and Anderson's Magnolia, Crash, by writer/director Paul Haggis weaves a tale of multiple characters through the web of streets we have come to know as Los Angeles. Unlike those other two films this one has a very specific theme to explore. From the opening line uttered by Don Cheadle we know this is to be a film about how people relate, and from the interchange that follows between Jennifer Esposito and Alexis Rhee (pretty sure she plays the Korean female driver who rear-ended her) how people relate tends to be ruled by first impressions or prejudice.

Race is paramount in this film, and all our preconceptions of who people are get twisted and turned through the intricate plot. With each new additional character we find another assumption, another stereotype, and then watch as that preconception is obliterated as the character develops. It is a credit to the deftly written script, tight direction and exceptional acting talent that every one of these many characters is fully realized on screen without ever feeling one-dimensional.

I would love to discuss some of the details of what happens to explain how well it is done, but part of the magic of this film is allowing yourself to be taken on this ride. Mind you, this isn't a ride of pleasure. The first half of this film is unrelentingly in its ferociousness. I could literally feel my rage at some of the characters forming to a fever pitch. The fear and hatred I was confronting wasn't just on the screen, but in the pit of my stomach. And in one absolutely brilliant moment I was literally sobbing at the expectation of horror unfolding, only to be cathartically released in a most unexpected way.

Mr. Haggis was in attendance at the screening I saw and explained that the idea for this film came to him one night sometime after 9/11 at about 2a.m. when his own memories of a car- jacking experience from 10 years before wouldn't leave him alone. Clearly this film was his way of relieving those demons of memory, using the catharsis of his art to unleash them and in doing so has given to all viewers of cinema an opportunity to examine our own preconceptions about race relations and how we treat each other and think of ourselves. He mentioned in the discussion after-wards that he likes to make films that force people to confront difficult issues. Films that ask people to think after the film has ended and not just leave saying: "that was a nice film".

This isn't a "nice" film, and I would expect that it will provoke many a discussion in the ensuing weeks when it opens nation-wide. It's a discussion long overdue for this country, and it took a Canadian to bring the issue to the fore in this brilliant, thought provoking film.


679 of 1,035 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 1,696 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook

Country:

USA | Germany | Australia

Language:

English | Persian | Spanish | Mandarin | Korean

Release Date:

6 May 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Crash See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$6,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,107,071, 8 May 2005

Gross USA:

$54,580,300

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$98,410,061
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

Holiday Movies on Prime Video for the Whole Family

Prime Video has you covered this holiday season with movies for the family. Here are some of our picks to get you in the spirit.

Get some picks



Recently Viewed