6.9/10
29,774
60 user 168 critic

Che: Part Two (2008)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama, History | 24 January 2009 (USA)
Trailer
2:31 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $14.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
In 1967, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara leads a small partisan army to fight an ill-fated revolutionary guerrilla war in Bolivia, South America.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
2 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Fidel Castro (as Demian Bichir)
... Raúl Castro
... Ernesto Che Guevara
... Aleida March
María D. Sosa ... Aleidita
Raúl Beltrán ... Bolivian Customs Agent #1
Raúl 'Pitín' Gómez ... Bolivian Customs Agent #2
Paty M. Bellott ... Woman at Airport
Othello Rensoli ... Pombo (Harry Villegas Tamayo)
... Tania (Haydee Tamara Bunke Bider)
... Tuma (Carlos Coello)
... President René Barrientos
Pablo Durán ... Pacho (Alberto Fernández Montes de Oca)
Ezequiel Díaz ... Loro (Jorge Vázquez Viaña)
Juan Salinas ... Polo (Apolinar Aquino Quispe)
Edit

Storyline

In 1965, Ernesto 'Che' Guevara resigns from his Cuban government posts to secretly make his latest attempt to spread the revolution in Bolivia. After arriving in La Paz, Bolivia late in 1966, by 1967, Che with several Cuban volunteers, have raised a small guerrilla army to take on the militarist Bolivian movement. However, Che must face grim realities about his few troops and supplies, his failing health, and a local population who largely does not share the idealistic aspirations of a foreign troublemaker. As the US supported Bolivian army prepares to defeat him, Che and his beleaguered force struggle against the increasingly hopeless odds. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

|

Release Date:

24 January 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Che  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$40,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

"SCREENPLAY BY TERRENCE MALICK & BENJAMIN VAN DER VEEN AND PETER BUCHMAN" were the writing credits at the Cannes Film festival in 2008 Where Che: Part One (2008)_ and this film were screened combined under the title "CHE". Once the film was released in several countries, the name of Terrence Malick was deleted and the sources of Ernesto Che Guevara's books were added, stating "BASED ON "THE BOLIVIAN DIARY" BY ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA" SCREENPLAY BY PETER BUCHMAN AND BENJAMIN VAN DER VEEN" for the second film and "BASED ON "REMINISCENCES ON THE CUBAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR" BY ERNESTO CHE GUEVARA" SCREENPLAY BY PETER BUCHMAN" for the first film. See more »

Goofs

At his execution, Che was shot a total of nine times, not three as shown in the movie. See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Ernesto Che Guevara: [to a Bolivian soldier about to execute him] Shoot. Do it.
See more »


Soundtracks

Balderrama
Lyrics by Manuel José Castilla
Music by Gustavo Leguizamon
Performed by Mercedes Sosa
Courtesy of Universal Music
Copyright (c) by Lagos Editorial (Warner/Chappell Music Argentina)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

Too kind to Che
28 February 2009 | by See all my reviews

Part One left Che on the road to Havana following the overthrow of the Batista dictatorship; Part Two jumps forward seven years, so that we miss out his time as a Minister in Castro's government and his abortive adventures in the Congo. Compared to the earlier film, this second element of the diptych is much tighter than the first in narrative terms, focusing only on Che's year in Bolivia (1966-67) and takes a straightforward chronological approach.

It has some of the strengths of the first film: the cinematography and direction of Steven Soderbergh, which give the whole work a lifelike, almost documentary feel, and the superb acting of Benicio del Toro who - even more than before - is rarely off the screen. However, the narrative is less compelling this time with the guerrillas seemingly going from one place to another with no obvious strategy. The main criticism of both parts though is that we have over four hours of excessively reverential treatment of an immensely controversial figure with little acknowledgement of the egotism that was at the heart of the doomed Bolivian mission.


24 of 40 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 60 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed