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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007)

PG-13 | | Action, Adventure, Family | 11 July 2007 (USA)
Trailer
0:31 | Trailer
With their warning about Lord Voldemort's return scoffed at, Harry and Dumbledore are targeted by the Wizard authorities as an authoritarian bureaucrat slowly seizes power at Hogwarts.

Director:

David Yates

Writers:

Michael Goldenberg (screenplay), J.K. Rowling (novel)
Popularity
420 ( 146)
Nominated for 2 BAFTA Film Awards. Another 15 wins & 44 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Daniel Radcliffe ... Harry Potter
Harry Melling ... Dudley Dursley
Jason Boyd Jason Boyd ... Piers
Richard Macklin Richard Macklin ... Malcolm
Kathryn Hunter ... Mrs. Arabella Figg
Miles Jupp ... TV Weatherman
Fiona Shaw ... Petunia Dursley
Richard Griffiths ... Vernon Dursley
Jessica Hynes ... Mafalda Hopkirk (voice) (as Jessica Stevenson)
Adrian Rawlins ... James Potter
Geraldine Somerville ... Lily Potter
Robert Pattinson ... Cedric Diggory (archive footage)
Ralph Fiennes ... Lord Voldemort
Natalia Tena ... Nymphadora Tonks
Brendan Gleeson ... Alastor 'Mad-Eye' Moody
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Storyline

After a lonely summer on Privet Drive, Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) returns to a Hogwarts full of ill-fortune. Few of students and parents believe him or Dumbledore (Sir Michael Gambon) that Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) is really back. The ministry had decided to step in by appointing a new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher, Professor Dolores Umbridge (Imelda Staunton), who proves to be the nastiest person Harry has ever encountered. Harry also can't help stealing glances with the beautiful Cho Chang (Katie Leung). To top it off are dreams that Harry can't explain, and a mystery behind something for which Voldemort is searching. With these many things, Harry begins one of his toughest years at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Written by HPfan

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The rebellion begins. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sequences of fantasy violence and frightening images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Since Alastor "Mad-Eye" Moody (Brendan Gleeson) has a prosthetic leg, he could not balance properly on a broomstick, being unable to use the stirrups. Instead, his broom has posts at the front where he rests his legs, a seat which allows him to lean backwards, and a control stick for his hands. The arrangement is very similar to automobiles made for double-amputees, which have hand controls instead of pedals. See more »

Goofs

In multiple shots throughout the movie you can clearly see that Harry's glasses have no lenses in them. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Radio announcer: I don't know about you, it's just too hot today, isn't it? And it's going to get even worse. Temperatures up in the mid 30's Celsius, that's the mid 90's Fahrenheit, tomorrow maybe even hitting 100. So please, remember to cover up and stay cool with the hottest hits on your FM dial.
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Crazy Credits

The ending credits are presented in the same typeface as Professor Umbridge's numerous educational decrees. See more »

Alternate Versions

Because this film includes so many scenes with important, written newspaper headlines, some dubbed versions have resorted to adding a voiceover reading them in their respective language. An example of this would be the German release. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Hated Movie Characters (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Hedwig's Theme
Written by John Williams
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User Reviews

 
Not without its flaws, but highly entertaining.
14 July 2007 | by PizzicatoFishCrouchSee all my reviews

After his fourth traumatic year at Hogwarts that ended with a showdown with the franchise's very own Mr Bad, Lord Voldemort, it doesn't seem too much for Harry Potter to be asking for a peaceful Summer. However, he doesn't get such a wish – from the opening scene in which Harry and his despised cousin Dudley have close encounters of the life-threatening kind with two dementors in an underground passage, it is clear that Voldemort has unfinished business with the scarred lad, and that he has every intention of finishing it. Plus, nearly everyone in Harry's school believe him to be a liar, Professor Dumbledore refuses to look him in the eye, his friends don't understand him, and, on top of that, Harry must grapple with the skills required in mastering his first kiss. My, my, aren't teenage lives complicated?!

A word of warning. This is not a film for the uninitiated. If "patronum", "Avada Kedavra" and "ministry of Magic" sound like code to you, then best avoid watching this. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix makes no attempt to guide the newbies along the story (and rightly so, because any attempt at that would detract from the film and patronize its viewers). To fully comprehend the plot, you must have seen the four previous films as well as read the book from which this film is based.

The film itself is a wonderful jumble of goods, bads, and uglies. There is plenty to enjoy here, starting with the flawless turn from Imelda Staunton as the sadistic Dolores Umbridge. The woman who we are so used to seeing in roles as the sweet old lady, whether it be in Shakespeare in Love, or her Oscar-nominated turn in Vera Drake, her performance here is a shock and a half. Kitted out from head to toe in pink and sporting a sugary air, we soon find that Umbridge, whose methods of punishment include using quills that protract blood on her students, is anything but sweet. Staunton captures Umbridge's ruthless oiliness perfectly; never before has evil been such fun to watch.

Rupert Grint is also a joy. His ginger hair, large blue eyes, bumbling demeanour and spot-on comedy timing make him the true star of the show, and every scene that he features in benefits as a result of his appearance. Simply put, he is Godly. Sadly, the other two teen stars are nowhere near as good as Grint; Radcliffe, who gave an adequate performance in the West End's Equus, is back to his shoddy self here with an array of overreaching facial expressions and laughable deliveries of his lines. He is most embarrassing of all in the lead-up to kissing Cho Chang, in which everyone in my cinema was collapsing with laughter at his "performance." But it gets even worst, for Emma Watson, aspiring Cambridge student, World Peace Representative (probably) and general object of annoyance to average, frumpy teenage girls such as myself, gave a performance that was so awful, it damn near lost me the will to live. She just couldn't portray any of her emotions convincingly, and just settled for saying the lines that were written for her. Whereas Hermione was one of my favourite characters in the book due to her kindness, knowledge and appreciation for others' feelings, Emma's presentation of Hermione makes her insufferable and punch-worthy. It ain't good.

The two "actors" aside, my main other foible with this film was how it cut/altered some very important details of the book. For example, in the book, it is Kreacher who betrays Sirius and puts him in danger. The appearance of Snape's past as a hated and bullied student is also poorly put together and left to linger rather than properly dealt with. The Cho Chang storyline is pitiful, whereas in the book, we had been led to see that she wasn't all that she had cracked up to be as a person, in the film, she is the sketchiest of sketches and written off practically before she has begun. In terms of 2007 releases, only Pirates of the Caribbean III had more plot holes than this.

That said, I had a huge amount of fun in the 2 and a half hours that this film played, with three newcomers to this movie, Yates (director), Michael Goldenberg (screenwriter) and Hooper (composer). The direction was apt, not perfect, but acceptable. The score was acceptable. The visual effects were stunning, especially in the climactic finale between Dumbeldore's Army and Voldemort's Deatheaters, led by Jason Isaacs, where an entire storeroom containing shelved globes containing prophecies, one of which concerns Harry. It is here that Helena Bonham Carter emerges as Bellatrix Lestrange, one of the final and greatest joys of the film. Laughing manically and sporting long hair greasier than a Professor Snape-Cristiano Ronaldo mixup, she makes the most of her limited screen time to deliver one of the best performances in all the Harry Potter movies. Utterly haunting.

Thus, verily I say, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a worthwhile outing. If you can put up with the abomination commonly known as "Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson trying to act", as well as the slightly pretentious over-editing of Harry's dream sequences, not to mention the ten thousand odd plot holes, then you should venture out to the cinema to see this. Not capital film-making, but, as I'm yet to see Ratatouille and The Simpsons movie, about as good as you'll get this Summer from the cinema.


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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

11 July 2007 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: The IMAX Experience See more »

Filming Locations:

Highland, Scotland, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$77,108,414, 15 July 2007

Gross USA:

$292,353,413

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$942,172,396
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Sonics-DDP (IMAX version)| Dolby Digital | DTS | SDDS | DTS (DTS: X)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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