The Message of the Palms (1913)

Henry Strong, a young civil engineer, is placed in charge of a party which makes a preliminary survey for a railroad. In their work they enter the property of Colonel Carlton who objects ... See full summary »

Director:

Robert G. Vignola
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Cast

Cast overview:
Henry Hallam ... Colonel Carlton
Alice Hollister ... Lovie Carlton - the Colonel's Daughter
Harry F. Millarde ... Henry Strong - the Surveyer (as Harry Millarde)
Robert G. Vignola ... Uncle Tom - the Colonel's Servant
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Storyline

Henry Strong, a young civil engineer, is placed in charge of a party which makes a preliminary survey for a railroad. In their work they enter the property of Colonel Carlton who objects decidedly to the invasion of his ancestral land. Henry secures the aid of the sheriff, who convinces Carlton that the young engineer is acting within his rights but the Colonel develops a spirit of animosity toward the surveyor. Lovie Carlton, the Colonel's daughter, does not share her father's opinion and falls deeply in love with Strong. Knowing that they cannot hope to secure the father's consent, the young people are secretly married and leave for South America, where Strong has secured a promising position. Several years pass. The Colonel refuses to read his daughter's letters and sends them back unopened. One adversity follows another until the old gentleman is ruined financially and finally dispossessed. His faithful servant. Uncle Tom, endeavors to secure employment that he may aid the Colonel... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 February 1913 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

Jacksonville, Florida, USA

Company Credits

Production Co:

Kalem Company See more »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Silent

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The picture's principle or idea has been skillfully embodied
8 August 2017 | by deickemeyerSee all my reviews

Situations alone have not much value. There are only a few possible, and these are used again and again. But in this picture, principle makes it easily the best offering released today. It is understood that the picture's principle or idea has been skillfully embodied by producer, players and cameraman. We have seen messages written on eggs and sent out through the market, and written on scraps of paper and sent in packages, but in this picture the message, a call from an old darkey servant to his one-time mistress (who had married against her father's will and gone away), asking that she come back, since he was getting too old to look out for her feeble, poverty- stricken father, is written on a palm, and the woman gets it on Palm Sunday in church. The scenario writer knew that in telling a story of human sentiment the cleaner and higher his means are the more effective they will be. Some writers seem to think that the selection of vulgar means is catering to the populous gallery. It isn't, and only makes plain the author's own state of grace. This is a valuable offering, and was clearly pleasing to a large house. - The Moving Picture World, March 15, 1913


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