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The Jacket (2005)

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A Gulf war veteran is wrongly sent to a mental institution for insane criminals, where he becomes the object of a doctor's experiments, and his life is completely affected by them.

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Writers:

(story), (story) | 1 more credit »
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Jack Starks
... Jackie Price
... Dr. Thomas Becker
... Dr. Beth Lorenson
... Jean Price
... The Stranger
... Rudy Mackenzie
... Dr. Hopkins
... Damon
... Nurse Harding
... Young Jackie
... Officer Harrison
... Captain Medley
... Intern #1
... Intern #2
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Storyline

The film centers on a wounded Gulf war veteran who returns to his native Vermont suffering from bouts of amnesia. He is hitching and gets picked up by a stranger, things go pear shaped when a cop pulls them over and is murdered by the stranger. The vet. is wrongly accused of killing the cop and lands up in an asylum. A quack doctor prescribes a course of experimental therapy, restraining him in a heavy duty straight jacket-like device, and locks him away in a body drawer of the basement morgue. During course of his treatment he gets flashbacks and visions of his future , where he can foresee he is to die in four days time. The catch is he doesn't know how. Thus commences the classic race against time. Written by Austin4577@aol.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Terror has a new name. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and brief sexuality/nudity | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

4 March 2005 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Regresiones de un hombre muerto  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$29,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,723,682, 6 March 2005, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$6,303,762, 18 December 2005

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$20,046,858, 18 June 2006
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film is based on the story "The Star Rover" by Jack London, which in turn, was based on his interviews with Ed Morrell, who, while in prison at San Quentin, was tortured, often with a very tight straitjacket, which constricted his chest, breathing, and blood flow. In order to cope with this, he quickly learned self-hypnosis, similar to what Jack Starks (Adrien Brody) goes through. See more »

Goofs

When Jack meets Jean and Jackie, the driver's door of their Chevy truck is wide open. Later, when he walks towards the car to fix its engine, the door is ajar. In the consecutive shots, it is wide open again. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jack Starks: [Walking over to Iraqi child who's breathing hard] How's it going little man? You all right?
[Babak pulls out gun. Jack puts his hand up in a stop gesture but Babak shoots Jack in the head. Jack falls to the ground]
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Connections

Features I Love Lucy: The I Love Lucy Christmas Show (1956) See more »

Soundtracks

We Have All the Time in the World
Written by John Barry and Hal David
Performed by David Arnold, featuring Iggy Pop
Courtesy of Warner Strategic Marketing UK
Under license from EMI Music Publishing Ltd.
Iggy Pop appears courtesy of Virgin Records America, Inc.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Trippy Yet Still Intelligent
10 August 2005 | by See all my reviews

First off, this film is not for everyone. It does, however, seem to delineate an emerging and exciting trend in contemporary film making whereby directors are becoming increasingly enamored with these sorts of dark, brooding, almost dreamscape-like and melodramatic thrillers which defy archetypal and conventional narrative formats. Think of the "The Machinist" and work your way backwards to "Vanilla Sky", or even as far back as 1990's "Jacob's Ladder" as one other reviewer accurately suggested.

To this end, "The Jacket" represents the apotheosis of this rising genre, and is both an artistic psychological thriller, as well as what you might call a metaphysical tragedy, and easily envelopes the viewer into its morose and sterile world replete with dreary snow scapes, perpetual grey skies and faces, muted and washed out colours, institutional isolation, and the angst of working class loners. The film's imagery and the pace of the story and script immediately command one's attention from the outset and the film is unrelenting in both its tension and gumption. Because of this, despite the story's meandering timeline and lack of feasible explanations for the protagonist's "visions", the viewer is still to an extent able to believe what they're seeing. Because the film takes itself so seriously, and actually pulls it off, the viewer then buying into the fantasy of the story becomes far more palatable than it does in other misguided attempts at this same sort of risky and artsy storytelling ie: "The Butterfly Effect".

This is an ambitious film which taps into both the romanticism and pain of our dreams and our memories, and how they both act upon us, and cause us to act upon them. It examines what is real versus perceived, the fragility of life, how each persons's life effects others, even passing strangers, and the sovereignty of the self and the mind. The film features outstanding performances from just about everyone on screen, particularly Brody as the hapless and tortured Jack Starks, and Kristofferson as the morally ambiguous and equally tortured Dr. Becker.

Despite the big names on the marquee, however, this, as previously mentioned, is not a cut and dry "popcorn flick" and will leave many people bewildered. It is for these people that the "Butterfly Effect" was made first, and now with them out of the way, the timing for a film of this caliber which deals with these issues properly is appropriate. "The Jacket" is a trippy and entertaining yet still very intelligent film which asks only that you check your preconceptions and logical rectitude at the door. By doing so, you'll find the imagination of this film is fact more real than you might have expected.


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