6.7/10
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23 user 7 critic

Everyday People (2004)

Not Rated | | Drama | 12 January 2006 (Hungary)
The closing of a local restaurant concerns a number of employees who've dedicated their lives to the eatery.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Nathan De'Shon Myers ...
Subway Opera Singer
...
Ira
...
Joleen
...
Arthur (as Stephen McKinley Henderson)
Sydnee Stewart ...
Erin Persaud
Billoah Greene ...
Samel
Kadijah Carlisle ...
Benita
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Shirley
...
Ali (as muMs)
Stephanie Berry ...
Angry Black Waiter
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Frantz (as Frantz St. Louis)
Stacie Linardos ...
Angry White Waiter
...
Victor
...
Akbar (Black Ribbon Friday)
Elizabeth Flax ...
Female Customer
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Storyline

The closing of a local restaurant concerns a number of employees who've dedicated their lives to the eatery.

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You can't wash out all the color and keep the flavor.

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Drama

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Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

12 January 2006 (Hungary)  »

Also Known As:

Brooklyn  »

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Did You Know?

Connections

References Terminator 2 (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Original Sin
Written by Corey Glover and MichaelCiro
Performed by Vice
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User Reviews

 
An undiluted look at human experience.
4 March 2005 | by See all my reviews

One of the most genuine and sincere filmic representations of human life that I've seen in recent months. I originally thought that it was overly ambitious, as the director focuses on the lives of upwards of a dozen characters during a course of the day, attempting to share their individual struggles and paint an accurate picture of their personalities. Directors often encounter difficulties in breathing life into one character, but somehow this film manages to show the inner substance of all of these people.

The story revolves around the decision to close a diner in Brooklyn due to economic shortfalls. It looks at everyone: the ethical conflicts of the restaurant owner, the hard-edged competitiveness of the businessman behind the deal, and even the ex-junkie dishwasher's story. It makes a point of avoiding, perhaps even negating, stereotyping based on racial backgrounds, gender, age and every other social factor.

The world shown in Everyday People is a world of problems and hardships with no direct solution - it merely offers the viewer an understanding, something which is extremely undervalued. There is a certain bleakness that arises from this postmodern realism, but McKay doesn't leave you with the sense of futility and sadness. Rather he helps break down the sense of social alienation in the viewer through this truly compassionate and impartial gaze.

Everyday People is comparable to Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing (1989), but I would argue that it's more subdued and mature exploration. Do the Right Thing has a more progressive story that builds up to and revolves around a central intense climax, whereas Everyday People is merely a snapshot of these people's lives with some minor character growth. Also, I feel that Do the Right Thing is also heavily biased in its initial premises, which Everyday People is generally free of.

Solid script, solid acting, (all the actors are more or less "unknowns") and an amazing final product. This is one of those movies that will never get the recognition it deserves.


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