Oldeuboi (2003) - News Poster

(2003)

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Film Review: Psychokinesis (2018) by Yeon Sang-ho

Making your follow up to one of the most successful films in Korean history is always going to be a difficult task, Yeon Sang-ho’s “Train to Busan” was a surprise success for the director’s first live action film. Not just because it was a horror, but also the fact Korean directors rarely touch the zombie genre. So from the get go his sophomore live action film “Psychokinesis” had some fairly big shoes to fill. Did it live up to expectations? Disappointingly no.

The movie tells the story of lowly bank security guard Seok-Heon, who, after drinking some tainted water gains the ability to move objects with his mind. Comes in handy when that cigarette lighter is just out of reach. He is contacted by his estranged daughter after a tragic event who is struggling with more than just recent tragedy. Her restaurant is being absconded by a greedy construction company,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘Hotel Artemis’ Film Review: Jodie Foster Heals Criminals, but This Dystopian Thriller Still Ails

‘Hotel Artemis’ Film Review: Jodie Foster Heals Criminals, but This Dystopian Thriller Still Ails
One of the great qualities of Jodie Foster over the course of her acting career is that she goes with anything: Disney, Scorsese, issue movies, serial killers, period romance, even Mel Gibson onscreen and off. Her terrier vibe, those open eyes, that often sly delivery — they’re all immensely versatile.

Hotel Artemis,” for example, is pop-dystopian quasi-Tarantino Los Angeles noir action thriller hooey about a boutique penthouse hospital for criminals who need stealth medical care. And yet Foster — aged up but energized as the grey-haired, tightly-wound nurse who runs the place like your favorite loved-but-ornery grade school teacher — fits right in with her molecule-shifting intelligence.

Puttering around in infirmary whites and a rust-colored sweater, using surgery gadgets while a confluence of untrustworthy, violent guests make her character’s hermetic existence progressively worse, Foster sells “Hotel Artemis” better than its own writer-director, Drew Pearce, a genre overstuffer who’s seen too many movies,
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Hotel Artemis’ Review: Drew Pearce’s Noir Pastiche Never Lives Up to its Potential

‘Hotel Artemis’ Review: Drew Pearce’s Noir Pastiche Never Lives Up to its Potential
It should be so easy to root for “Hotel Artemis.” An original, star-studded, somewhat sci-fi crime thriller in a summer movie season that’s already bloated with sterile franchise junk, Drew Pearce’s directorial debut is exactly the kind of mid-budget divertissement that cinema needs to survive. In theory, at least.

Set in an art deco hideout that’s been refashioned into a secret hospital for criminals and killers, the film has so much working in its favor: Sterling K. Brown in a lead role! Jodie Foster’s first acting work in five years! Dave Bautista as a sweet-natured strongman who barks things like “Check out time is never!” Not to mention Jeff Goldblum playing a feared underworld figure known only as “The Wolf King,” and a scene where someone gets murdered with a 3D printer! And it wraps all of this stuff in a moldy enchilada of future panic,
See full article at Indiewire »

Animal cruelty and film classification | Letters

Craig Lapper of the film classification board explains its decisions on cutting scenes of animal cruelty

Anne Billson asserts that the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) “still cuts non-faked animal abuse, although it is more lenient on arthouse than horror”. The article goes on to cite Sátántangó (1994) and Oldboy (2003) as examples of our alleged leniency towards “arthouse” films, in contrast to our long history of intervention with The Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978) and Cannibal Ferox (1981). I am afraid this statement is incorrect and no preferential treatment is given to “arthouse” films.

Sátántangó was only classified uncut after we received detailed assurances from the film-makers regarding how the scenes with the cat were prepared and filmed in such a way as to avoid cruelty to the animal involved. Those assurances were consistent with the onscreen evidence. Oldboy was classified uncut because the Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act 1937, which is mentioned in the article,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The 25 Best Foreign-Language Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

  • Indiewire
Earlier this year, the IndieWire staff counted down our favorite English-language movie scenes of the 21st century. Now that due attention has been paid to Llewyn Davis’ heartbreaking audition, Daniel Plainview’s heartless approach to milkshakes, and several more of the most unforgettable moments in recent memory, it’s time to broaden our horizons.

It’s a big world out there, but great cinema has the power to bring it a little closer together. From an accordion jam session led by Denis Lavant, to an intimate slow dance in a small Parisian bar, these passages are too perfect for anything to get lost in translation.

These are our picks for the 25 best foreign-language film scenes of the 21st century.

25. “Holy Motors” (Entracte)

Midway through Leos Carax’s surreal and beautiful look at a man (Denis Lavant) who undergoes a series of disguises over the course of a very strange night,
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Addison Heath and Jasmine Jakupi

Addison Heath is a multi-award winning writer, director and editor from Melbourne, Australia. After returning to Australia from a trip to Japan, he developed his early interest in filmmaking by creating the early shorts Brethren and Drive-By which got him noticed in the underground Australian film community. Moving on by directing full-length efforts Under a Kaleidoscope, Mondo Yakuza and The Perfect Nonsense, he honed by his skillset and his reputation for relentless and confrontational genre-bending efforts which pegged him as one of the most intriguing artists to watch in the scene alongside his jointly-owned production company, Black Forest Films.

Jasmine Jakupi is a multi-award winning production designer and producer born & raised in Melbourne, Australia. Whilst studying her Bachelor of Design (Interior Design) at Rmit, Jasmine started to focus on the medium of film. She is since known for her multi-faceted work on feature films Under A Kaleidoscope, Mondo Yakuza & The Perfect Nonsense.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

‘BlacKkKlansman’ Cannes Review: Spike Lee Looks Back – and Forward – in Anger

‘BlacKkKlansman’ Cannes Review: Spike Lee Looks Back – and Forward – in Anger
It’s been almost three decades since a Spike Lee movie screened in competition at the Cannes Film Festival, but he has certainly returned to the Croisette with a vengeance. “BlacKkKlansman,” which premiered on Monday night in the Grand Theatre Lumiere, is quintessential Spike Lee, impassioned and messy and vital as anything he’s done in decades.

It’s also far more accomplished a piece of filmmaking than many of Lee’s recent narrative films. Let’s face it, the director of “She’s Gotta Have It,” “Do the Right Thing” and “Malcolm X” has long been an iconic director, educator and activist, but films like “Red Hook Summer,” “Miracle at St. Anna,” “Oldboy” and even the spirited but uneven “Chi-Raq” just didn’t have the impact or the quality of his earlier films.

His television documentaries, including “When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts” and “If God
See full article at The Wrap »

Cinematographer Revealed for the It Sequel

They defeated It when they were kids, but the Losers' Club will have to face the ancient entity again as adults in It: Chapter Two, and following recent potential casting reveals for the sequel, a new cinematographer is reportedly on board for the anticipated film.

Collider reports that Checco Varese will be the cinematographer for It: Chapter Two. Chung-hoon Chung served as the director of photography on the first It film, but as Collider points out, director Andy Muschietti could be looking for a different visual style in the sequel, which will take place around 27 years after the 1989-set first film, with the Losers' Club inevitably returning to their hometown of Derry to face the return of It, aka Pennywise. This change in visual style is also reflected with The Shape of Water production designer Paul Austerberry coming on board for the It sequel (Claude Paré was the production designer
See full article at DailyDead »

A Novel Approach as Producers Revive Decades-Old Books for TV

In today's booming global market for TV drama, everything old is new again.

Fueled by the seemingly insatiable hunger for high-end TV among international broadcasters, cable outlets and streaming platforms, producers are dusting off decades-old novels and films and turning them into limited series.

AMC and the BBC are adapting the 1983 John le Carre thriller The Little Drummer Girl as a six-part series featuring Michael Shannon, Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth) and True Blood's Alexander Skarsgard and directed by Korean auteur Park Chan-wook (Oldboy). Italy's 11 Marzo Film and Palomar, together with Tmg in Germany, is rebooting Umberto Eco's 1980 medieval...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

'Seven Years of Night': Film Review

'Seven Years of Night': Film Review
Renowned genre director Park Chan-wook’s brutal, bloody 2003 Oldboy notoriously set the bar among South Korean revenge thrillers so high that more than a dozen years later similar films are inevitably measured against that standard. Seven Years of Night, adapted from Jeong You-jeong’s best-selling novel, represents another attempt among many others that falls short by comparison, burdened with a convoluted script and inconsistent performances.

Every revenge story needs at least one clearly defined tragedy as a foundation -- writer-director Choo Chang-min’s fifth feature has two, one for each of the guilt-ridden fathers at the center of the film.

Choi Hyun-su...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

How Great Books Become Prestige Limited Series

In today's booming global market for TV drama, everything old is new again. Fueled by the seemingly insatiable hunger for high-end TV among international broadcasters, cable outlets and streaming platforms, producers are dusting off decades-old novels and films and turning them into limited series.

AMC and the BBC are adapting the John le Carre 1983 thriller The Little Drummer Girl as a six-part series featuring Michael Shannon and directed by Korean auteur Park Chan-wook (Oldboy). Italy's 11 Marzo Film and Palomar, together with Tmg in Germany, is rebooting Umberto Eco's 1980 medieval crime drama The Name of the Rose as...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

The Problem With East Asian Action Cinema Today

Tom Jolliffe takes a look at recent trends in East Asian Action Cinema…

I’ve seen a lot of action films in my time. From all over the world. From the biggest blockbusters, to the straight to VHS specials that used to regularly populate your nearest video store. Whether it was the latest mega budget Schwarzenegger special, or Don ‘The Dragon’ Wilson starring in Bloodfist: VIII, I’ve put the hours in.

Like most Westerners my enthusiasm for the genre began with American films. Historically it has been America providing the majority of action films that register worldwide. I grew up on Die Hard, Predator, Lethal Weapon, Bloodsport and every low rent VHS premiere copycat you can imagine (Oh Don…). A little later I discovered Hong Kong and Chinese action films, particularly from that 80’s to early 90’s period of the former which saw ground breaking performers like Jackie Chan
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Ryu Seung-ryong in Trailer for Korean Thriller 'Seven Years of Night'

"The death triggers the devil within..." Cj Entertainment from Korea has released a new official Us trailer for a Korean thriller titled Seven Years of Night, directed by Choo Chang-min, slated for release in early April in just a few weeks. The dark crime film tells the story of a man plotting a revenge, over a period of seven years, against the son of his daughter's murderer in a hit-and-run accident by a lake. The tagline from the poster is pretty slick - "there's something that never sinks" - which imagines up all kinds of intriguing possibilities, and fits with the emotional story. "The long nightfall of rage and revenge." The cast of Seven Years of Night includes Ryu Seung-ryong, Jang Dong-gun, Song Sae-byuk, Ko Gyoung-pyo, and Jeong Hee Moon. This reminds me a bit of Park Chan-wook's early films, like Oldboy and Mr. Vengeance, which give the characters copious
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Spike Lee’s Spider-Man Spinoff Nightwatch Hooks Cheo Hodari Coker To Write

You can go ahead and add Nightwatch to the growing list of Spider-Man projects percolating at Sony.

As we learned late last year, the industry giant once had its crosshairs placed on Spike Lee, director of Oldboy and Inside Man, to develop a spinoff based on the character known as Doctor Kevin Trench. And now, it appears Nightwatch has taken one giant leap towards production with Lee in tow.

That Hashtag Show has the scoop, revealing that Cheo Hodari Coker (Luke Cage) has produced a script that will now serve as the basis of Spike Lee’s live-action spinoff. Chances are Coker’s screenplay was pulled from the original treatment produced by Now You See Me screenwriter, Ed Ricourt – he was supposedly attached to Nightwatch at the very beginning, after all – though without any official word from Sony, we’ll have to file that one in the rumor cabinet for now.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Michael Shannon Joins Park Chan-Wook’s AMC Series ‘The Little Drummer Girl’

Well, this might just win the good news award of the day. Everybody's fav Michael Shannon is set to join the cast of The Handmaiden and Oldboy director Park Chan-wook's television debut The Little Drummer Girl, based on the best-selling novel of the same name by John le Carré. Shannon will play Israeli spymaster Kurtz in the tangled tale of espionage and joins previously announced cast members Florence Pugh (Lady Macbeth) and newly minted Golden Globe winner Alexander Skarsgård (Big Little Lies). The project comes from the Ink Factory, BBC One and AMC that spawned …
See full article at Collider.com »

Korea’s Ex-Culture Minister Jailed for Operating Talent Blacklist

Korea’s Ex-Culture Minister Jailed for Operating Talent Blacklist
Former South Korean minister of culture, Cho Yoon-sun has been sent to jail for her part in operating a blacklist of media and entertainment figures who did not support the government of disgraced ex-president Park Geun-hye.

An appeals court in Seoul on Tuesday, reviewing the case, found her guilty of conspiracy and increased Cho’s penalty to two years in prison, according to the Yonhap news agency. Cho had previously been cleared of the blacklist charge and given only a one-year suspended sentence for perjury. She was arrested in the court and taken into immediate custody.

Kim Chi-choon, Park’s former chief of staff, also had his sentence increased from three years to four. The court also declared impeached president Park an accomplice. It explained that Park regarded the culture industry as too left of the political center, and decided that it should be “set right.”

Park ordered Kim and Cho to establish a list – that reportedly
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wow… Just Wow! Oldboy Red Band Trailer Arrives – Nsfw

Time to bring the hammer in this red-band trailer for Spike Lee’s Oldboy.

Afterwards, head on over to the film’s Facebook page for some interesting visuals from the film: https://www.facebook.com/OldBoyMovie

(Yahoo! Movies)

Love it! The trailer alone has me squirming.

Oldboy is a provocative, visceral thriller that follows the story of an advertising executive (Josh Brolin) who is abruptly kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years in solitary confinement. When he is inexplicably released, he embarks on an obsessive mission to discover who orchestrated his bizarre and torturous punishment only to find he is still trapped in a web of conspiracy and torment.

Oldboy is a remake of Chan-wook Park’s 2003 movie ”Oldeuboi.” The director won the Grand Prize of the Jury for his film at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004.

Co-starring Samuel L. Jackson, Elizabeth Olsen and Sharlto Copley, Oldboy was directed by Spike Lee,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oldboy movie poster 2

The second poster has arrived for Spike Lee's Oldboy remake, starring Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olsen and Sharlto Copley. FilmDistrict distributes the thriller which tells of Joe Doucett (Brolin) an advertising executive who is held captive for 20 years for reasons unknown. When released, he tries to find who held him hostage, and for what reason, and finds himself trapped in a web of torment. Copley plays a mysterious billionaire bent on destroying the protagonist's life, while Olsen plays a caseworker aiding Brolin's character in investigating the past. Also in the cast are Michael Imperioli, Samuel L. Jackson, Rami Malek, Lance Reddick and Max Casella. Mark Protosevich wrote the screenplay based on the Manga by Garon Tsuchiya and Nobuaki Minegishi. Park Chan-wook directed the original Oldeuboi 2003 film.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

First Oldboy remake poster arrives

Catch the new poster for Oldboy, starring Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Olson, Samuel L. Jackson and Sharlto Copley in the Spike Lee film which opens October 11th, 2013 via FilmDistrict. Mark Protosevich scripts based on the manga by Garon Tsuchiya and Nobuaki Minegishi. Fans of the 2003 original Oldboy (Oldeuboi) film directed by Park Chan-wook will be curious to see how this one turns out. The cast also includes Richard Portnow, Michael Imperioli, Lance Reddick, Max Casella, James Ransone and Hannah Ware. Brolin stars as a man kidnapped and imprisoned for fifteen years for reasons unknown. When released, he tries to find who held him hostage, and for what reason. Copley would play a mysterious billionaire bent on destroying the protagonist's life, while Olsen is set to play a caseworker aiding Brolin's character in investigating the past.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »
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