In Nazi-occupied France during World War II, a plan to assassinate Nazi leaders by a group of Jewish U.S. soldiers coincides with a theatre owner's vengeful plans for the same.

Director:

Quentin Tarantino
Popularity
119 ( 6)
Top Rated Movies #85 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 132 wins & 172 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Brad Pitt ... Lt. Aldo Raine
Mélanie Laurent ... Shosanna
Christoph Waltz ... Col. Hans Landa
Eli Roth ... Sgt. Donny Donowitz
Michael Fassbender ... Lt. Archie Hicox
Diane Kruger ... Bridget von Hammersmark
Daniel Brühl ... Fredrick Zoller
Til Schweiger ... Sgt. Hugo Stiglitz
Gedeon Burkhard ... Cpl. Wilhelm Wicki
Jacky Ido ... Marcel
B.J. Novak ... Pfc. Smithson Utivich
Omar Doom ... Pfc. Omar Ulmer
August Diehl ... Major Hellstrom
Denis Ménochet ... Perrier LaPadite
Sylvester Groth ... Joseph Goebbels
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Storyline

In German-occupied France, young Jewish refugee Shosanna Dreyfus witnesses the slaughter of her family by Colonel Hans Landa. Narrowly escaping with her life, she plots her revenge several years later when German war hero Fredrick Zoller takes a rapid interest in her and arranges an illustrious movie premiere at the theater she now runs. With the promise of every major Nazi officer in attendance, the event catches the attention of the "Basterds", a group of Jewish-American guerrilla soldiers led by the ruthless Lt. Aldo Raine. As the relentless executioners advance and the conspiring young girl's plans are set in motion, their paths will cross for a fateful evening that will shake the very annals of history. Written by The Massie Twins

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

If You Need Heroes, Send In The Basterds See more »

Genres:

Adventure | Drama | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong graphic violence, language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The surname of Omar Ulmer is a reference to German Expressionist filmmaker Edgar G. Ulmer. See more »

Goofs

In the tavern scene there is a female Nazi sergeant. There were no female soldiers in the Third Reich, except of helpers for AA guns, medical orderlies, and aircraft mechanics in the Luftwaffe. See more »

Quotes

Sgt. Donny Donowitz: [to Butz, after beating Rachtman to death with his Louisville Slugger] GET THE FUCK UP! You're on deck!
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Crazy Credits

Both the opening and closing credits change fonts numerous times, displaying typefaces seen in a variety of earlier and subsequent Tarantino films. See more »

Alternate Versions

In the German version the first "Who am I?" game in the tavern scene runs slightly (ca. 1 minute) longer. Specifically, 'Winnetou' gets to ask more questions on who he is. Later he orders Schnaps from Mathilda. See more »


Soundtracks

THE VERDICT
(1966)
("Dopo la condanna")
Written by Ennio Morricone
Performed by Ennio Morricone
Courtesy of EMI Music Publishing Italia srl
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User Reviews

Not for critics, but people who love a good movie
22 August 2009 | by JawsphobiaSee all my reviews

Some critics might claim to need a code key to interpret what Tarantino means by this revisionist adventure film, but I'd say it's right under their up-turned noses: There's a great little scene where Mike Meyers plays a British military man who anticipates attacking a Nazi film premiere so he brings in an a film critic as an adviser. This may or may not be necessary but it does allow for a dialogue exchange like: Meyers: What do you do? Critic: I am a film critic.

Meyers: What are your accomplishments? Even though the critic goes on to list some compilation books, it may as well be a rhetorical question.

Tarantino thumbs his nose at convention and that is part of the movie's appeal. His movies are often about movies as much as they are about the content at hand. Yet he still manages to sustain genuine tension. The opening Nazi interrogation of a French farmer and a later a tavern basement guessing game scene must have had whopping page counts but they play out as chapters and remain engrossing high stakes set pieces. In the same film he can introduce a character by throwing a title onto the screen as if this member of the "Basterds" was cool enough to have his own movie, or play a 1980's David Bowie song while a woman prepares to do battle in her own way while Nazi flags hang outside the window.

The movie takes place in an alternate universe that could either be a dream or the unreality of the grind-house era Tarantino has celebrated in Kill Bill and, well, Grindhouse. Anyone with a brain will get that. If that sounds good, see it. I notice now there are blurbs about "how Jewish critics feel" about the movie. Well, those who go to a movie with a deliberately misspelled title knowing it is a revisionist fantasy and can't bear to see the character of Hitler as the butt of the joke don't have an opinion worthy of note. If you are an expert on NASA, your views on George Lucas' Star Wars movies are not necessarily of use to me. In fact it's a little galling that such a critic-proof designation as "Jewish critic" should be trotted out. They can say what they like about a sensitive document with the intentions of Schindler's List and God bless them. But if someone gets his boxers in a bunch over slapstick Nazis or clueless Hitler autographing the Grain Diary for Indiana Jones, then they just aren't going to be the right audience for Inglourious Basterds. In fact they shouldn't be watching fun movies at all. They should try staring at a blank wall and talking to themselves rather than type up their blather.

But it's not all fun. Sad things do happen and unfortunate events occur in this movie. The tension even in dialogue does come from the danger of having a Nazi at the table or someone daring to ask him to leave. But when you get reviewers comparing the Basterds to Al Qaida I think we can excuse those critics from the table as well. Or call Eli Roth over to them and yell "Play ball!"


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Details

Country:

USA | Germany

Language:

English | German | French | Italian

Release Date:

21 August 2009 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Inglorious Bastards See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$70,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$38,054,676, 23 August 2009

Gross USA:

$120,540,719

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$321,457,747
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Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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