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A Fair Exchange (1911)

Madge Norman is engaged to be married to George, the only son of Judge Ray, of New Mexico. Carita is the sweetheart of Pedro Sanchez, the leader of a band of horse thieves. Juan, the ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
... Madge Norman
... (as T.J. Carrigan)
... (as Otis B. Thayer)
Rex De Rosselli
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Storyline

Madge Norman is engaged to be married to George, the only son of Judge Ray, of New Mexico. Carita is the sweetheart of Pedro Sanchez, the leader of a band of horse thieves. Juan, the brother of Pedro, is captured in the act of driving off a herd of and he is imprisoned. George and Madge ride out on horseback and are picnicking in the woods. George goes to a spring for water and he is captured by Pedro Sanchez and his gang, who are accompanied by Carita. Madge, alarmed by George's absence, mounts her horse, and unobserved sees and follows her lover and his captors. Carita drops her hat and goes back for it. Madge decides to capture the Mexican girl and hold her hostage until George is freed by Sanchez. The rides that follow in which the American girl chases the Mexican girl, and the neck-and-neck dash ending in the capture of the Mexican, are real thrillers from start to finish. Sanchez compels George to write to his father that he will be released when the Judge orders the release of ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

17 August 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A good deal of business in the early part that didn't justify itself
2 April 2016 | by See all my reviews

A situation fresh in moving pictures gives life to this sprightly melodrama. The heroine, a fine horsewoman, after a hard chase captures the bandit's sweetheart and she is rewarded by being able to write to the bandit in substance: "You have my lover, I have your sweetheart; let's exchange." The exchange is promptly made. To this reviewer it seemed that there was a good deal of business in the very early part of this picture that didn't justify itself. It opened with a conversation that the spectators had no means of understanding. It seemed also that the relationship of the players, the judge with his son, also the relationship of the bandit brothers should have been made clear sooner. The failure to make this reviewer early understand these relationships left some confusion in his mind until as the situation progresses it becomes all clear and plain. This momentary confusion was not sufficient to spoil the pleasure that the play and its happy ending give. - The Moving Picture World, August 19, 1911


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