3.7/10
577
10 user 1 critic

Kohtalon kirja (2003)

Fire, water, wind, earth and emptiness... Five core elements of life that once inspired a book. The Booke of Fate. Far away from here there was a mythical world -free of suffering and ... See full summary »

Directors:

Tommi Lepola, Tero Molin
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Asko Sahlman Asko Sahlman ... Vladimir Konstantinov
Markku Partanen Markku Partanen ... Sergei Konstantinov / Rosvo 3
Juha-Pekka Mikkola Juha-Pekka Mikkola ... Viktor Konstantinov / Muukalainen / Viljo Ronkainen / Henri Lillqvist / Apollo
Saija Jäntti Saija Jäntti ... Vampyyri käytävässä
Johanna Kokko Johanna Kokko ... Tatjana Konstantinov / Rosa / Elsa Ronkainen / Ronja / Anyai'h / Enya
Eila Roine Eila Roine ... Mummo
Joni Saarela Joni Saarela ... Vampyyrintappaja mies
Anna-Maija Paakkola Anna-Maija Paakkola ... Vampyyrintappaja nainen
Ilkka Niemi ... Vanha vampyyri / Kaksintaistelija
Sara Vilander Sara Vilander ... Naisvampyyri 1
Saana Hyvärinen Saana Hyvärinen ... Naisvampyyri 2
Johanna Hongisto Johanna Hongisto ... Naisvampyyri 3
Laura Rikkonen Laura Rikkonen ... Naisvampyyri 4
Tommi Lepola Tommi Lepola ... Hirttäjä / Sotilas
Johanna Rajala Johanna Rajala ... Lapsi
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Storyline

Fire, water, wind, earth and emptiness... Five core elements of life that once inspired a book. The Booke of Fate. Far away from here there was a mythical world -free of suffering and injustice. But it wasn't enough. People wanted to play God... They created a pen to control the Booke of Fate. Mightier than a sword, it could write off deeds -and bring back the dead. But the book gave power, power caused fear -and fear brought suffering. And the suffering caused wars. Darkness fell on earth, making demands on the pen and the book. But the book was gone. It was thought to be lost forever -but hundreds of years later it reappeared on a small planet called Earth. The prophecy says: Only the chosen will get a second chance from the book. The destiny of the chosen one is to guide the book back. But his journey will be long, filled with errors and grief. This is his story. Written by press@kohtalonkirja.com

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Plot Keywords:

findie | book | fate | priest | castle | See All (28) »

Taglines:

Kertaus on opintojen äiti. See more »


Certificate:

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Finland

Language:

Finnish

Release Date:

October 2006 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Kohtalo See more »

Filming Locations:

Helsinki, Finland See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

After the credits, there is a trailer for a sequel, Kohtalon kirja 2. At the end of the ad the speaker (Santeri Kinnunen) gets doubts about the film's release and says "Maybe, we'll see, eh. At least they finished this one". See more »

Soundtracks

Children of Decadence
Written and arranged by Alexi Laiho
Performed by Children Of Bodom
(P) Spinefarm Records / (C) Ranka Publishing
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User Reviews

 
The Book of Fate
14 October 2010 | by random_avengerSee all my reviews

Film students' graduation movies are often somewhat rough around the edges and suffer from low distribution, but sometimes there are gems to be found among them too. A good example would be Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää's beautifully enigmatic The Visitor (2008), but Tero Molin and Tommi Lepola's epic genre-crosser The Book of Fate is well worth a watch as well.

Much larger and expensive a production than an average film school graduation work, The Book of Fate tells the story of a mysterious cosmic book written long ago by an ancient race of powerful beings. Once thought to be lost forever, the Book has now been located on Earth and keeps appearing in various places in different eras of history. The story is divided into five segments: an 18th century vampire horror flick, a stylized western, a gritty Winter War portrayal, a modern techno-thriller and a futuristic science fiction finale. Each segment is about 15 minutes in length and stars recently graduated acting students Juha-Pekka Mikkola and Johanna Kokko in various roles. All the stories are concluded at the end, and the priest character from the first segment makes dream-like appearances in the other stories as well.

It is obvious that the writer-directors Lepola and Molin are very familiar with the conventions of the genres they utilize in their story. The ultra-cool gunslinger with no name and the quiet, tense stand-offs and shootouts of the western segment are clearly influenced by the legendary Dollar trilogy by Sergio Leone, while the present day agent thriller plays out like a mash-up of James Bond plot lines and the suave style of The Matrix trilogy. The grainy black and white Winter War segment evokes memories of the legendary The Unknown Soldier (1955), often considered the definitive war film in Finland. When the film's tagline is "repetition is the mother of learning", it is obvious that the movie has been written with a wink in the eye, so strict demands for originality are not reasonable here – The Book of Fate is basically five genre movies in one.

The fragmented nature of the narrative allows the filmmakers to demonstrate their aptitude for very different styles of presenting a scene. The lighting, cinematography, camera work and music change from one segment to another, always staying true to the traditional style of the genres covered. I especially liked the yellow and sepia tones of the western segment and the cold, stark colours of the present day scenes. The martial arts and the gunplay in the agent thriller are also pretty cool and decently planned, even if not as smooth and fast as in "real" big budget actioners. The bright white glow of the final segment on an isolated space ship is pleasing to the eye as well, but the gloomy vampire tale at the beginning feels a bit too dark at points. Also, the black and white photography of the Winter War scenes could have been starker, although in a way the grayness enhances the realistic atmosphere.

Besides the aspects mentioned above, the diverse sets deserve a nod too; the film cleverly utilizes existing locations (such as the yard of a roofless church, the Särkänniemi amusement park and the Wild West village in Ähtäri) to cut corners in the set design budget that could have otherwise grown very large. The costumes and makeup are very well created too, particularly in the western, thriller and sci-fi segments.

Besides the two lead actors Mikkola and Kokko who appear as protagonists in every segment, many well-known Finnish veteran actors make appearances in the different eras of the film's timeline. Especially Vesa Vierikko is both funny and cool as the mad scientist Strömberg in the present day segment and the legendary Åke Lindman boils in rage in his very last credited movie role as the intergalactic leader Galagf in the sci-fi scenes. Smaller roles have also been given to ex-wrestler Tony Halme (playing a bulky commander), "the man without a past" Markku Peltola (a scientist) and Santeri Kinnunen (an Army lieutenant). A lot of the acting is somewhat stiff and theatrical (using formal textbook language doesn't help either), but it doesn't really bother me much since the movie is largely an homage to genres that are not known for world-class acting in the first place.

Even though none of the individual segments can be called a masterpiece, together they make a very entertaining whole. For a Finnish student film The Book of Fate is an extraordinary achievement, but even when compared to real genre flicks from which Molin and Lepola have drawn their inspiration, the movie is not terrible at all in spite of the appallingly low IMDb rating (3.7/10 with 436 votes at the time of writing this). There is also a lot of humour thrown in; luckily it is not the boring We-Know-We-Are-Making-a-Bad-Movie kind of intentional crappiness, but instead subtler references to the clichés of each genre (stay tuned for the hilarious post-credit faux-trailer). Fully acknowledging its diverse cinematic roots, The Book of Fate is a movie for film buffs by fellow film buffs; warmly recommended to any cinephile with an eclectic taste in popular cinema.


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