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180°: Christopher Nolan Interviews Al Pacino (2002)

Director Christopher Nolan conducts an interview with legendary actor Al Pacino. The title limits what is done here, since Pacino probably asks Nolan more questions than Nolan asks Pacino. ... See full summary »

Director:

Richard Ingber
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Cast

Credited cast:
Christopher Nolan ... Himself
Al Pacino ... Himself
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Storyline

Director Christopher Nolan conducts an interview with legendary actor Al Pacino. The title limits what is done here, since Pacino probably asks Nolan more questions than Nolan asks Pacino. Most of the interview, that takes place in a hotel room, is centered around the film Insomnia (2002) in which both individuals were involved. Written by Rhyl Donnelly

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Genres:

Documentary | Short

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 October 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

180 Degrees: Christopher Nolan Interviews Al Pacino See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This interview is featured on the DVD for _Insomnia (2002)_, released in 2002. See more »

Connections

References Heat (1995) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Halfway is a good start
16 July 2017 | by TBJCSKCNRRQTreviewsSee all my reviews

This is found on my library's copy of Insomnia. It's an 17 minute interview with Christopher Nolan and Al Pacino. As it announces itself, it is: An unscripted conversation on a Saturday afternoon. Sipping tea, which is an... interesting sight, for both, perhaps especially the latter, who is calm as a breeze, in person and out of character. A lot of what is discussed isn't specific to this movie, rather, both talk craft, based on their experiences with other professionals in the business.

They go into trusting the work they are doing. Theatre versus cinema. Francis Ford Coppola, and his reaction to not getting an extra setup on a funeral scene(as you may know, there are a few of those in the Godfather trilogy). Rehearsal, talking through, story-boarding and the comparisons between those approaches. The relationships between cast and crew. Using your time right. Sidney Lumet would ask a lot, and it would pay off: Serpico is used as an example, and I would have to agree that you can see the effort put into it. Using an old-fashioned lens and distance between actor and camera. Projecting, not screaming, on stage. Trusting the face to express what they're thinking, on the silver screen. Tony Montana being Cuban. How Walter is played and what effect that has. What it adds to watch it more than once. The odd couple dynamic.

I recommend this to anyone who wants to know more about the picture. 7/10


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