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It is the second largest of the world's great religions, and the fastest growing. Its name comes from the word for peace, yet to many Westerners it is synonymous with terror. INSIDE ISLAM ... See full summary »

Director:

Mark Hufnail

Writer:

Douglas Brooks West (as Mitch Lodwick)
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It is the second largest of the world's great religions, and the fastest growing. Its name comes from the word for peace, yet to many Westerners it is synonymous with terror. INSIDE ISLAM lifts the veil of mystery surrounding a misunderstood faith. Trace its roots back to the Hebrew Bible and discover how the Five Pillars, the religion's central tenets, helped spread Islam to the far corners of the world. Find out what the Qu'Ran says about war, violence and suicide, and how these words have been co-opted by extremists. And hear from experts like Khaled Abou el Fadl (author of Speaking in God's Name), who explore the challenges facing Islam today, including a crisis of authority and deep divisions among many sects. Illuminating, important and objective, INSIDE ISLAM exposes the heart of a faith mired in controversy. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Documentary

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Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 September 2002 (USA) See more »

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Look elsewhere for info on Islam
25 January 2005 | by alexcmu80See all my reviews

This documentary starts strong, with a decent summary of the complicated early history of Islam and vivid images. That said, this is an unambiguously poor work. The film turns into a fear-heavy op-ed, describing 9/11 as a "culmination" of Islamic anger. In a weak effort at objectivity, the narrator notes that events like Oklahoma City attest to the fact that Islam has "no monopoly on terror." Wow. The film does offer a generally diverse array of Muslim voices, but again falls into the trap of over-simplicity by concluding with an Iraqi-born Muslim man thanking America for restoring his dignity: "I love this country." "I thank God for bringing me to this country so I can feel again that I am a human." The film ends with a narrator reading this cue card: "Some are hopeful that Muslims, Christians, and Jews will be able reestablish a peaceful co-existence, but others aren't so sure, as violence continues, suicide bombers get younger, and death tolls go on rising." For a film that purports to go "Inside Islam" and identifies "seeing each other as stereotypes, rather than as human beings" as a major symptom of today's conflicts, the filmmakers do nothing to show the practical realities of Muslim life today. Instead, we have an uncreative and one dimensional local news piece.


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