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Cinderella Man (2005)

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The story of James Braddock, a supposedly washed-up boxer who came back to become a champion and an inspiration in the 1930s.

Director:

Ron Howard

Writers:

Cliff Hollingsworth (screenplay), Akiva Goldsman (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
3,130 ( 226)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 16 wins & 41 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Russell Crowe ... Jim Braddock
Renée Zellweger ... Mae Braddock
Paul Giamatti ... Joe Gould
Craig Bierko ... Max Baer
Paddy Considine ... Mike Wilson
Bruce McGill ... Jimmy Johnston
David Huband ... Ford Bond
Connor Price ... Jay Braddock
Ariel Waller ... Rosemarie Braddock
Patrick Louis ... Howard Braddock
Rosemarie DeWitt ... Sara
Linda Kash ... Lucille Gould
Nicholas Campbell ... Sporty Lewis
Gene Pyrz Gene Pyrz ... Jake
Chuck Shamata ... Father Rorick
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Storyline

During the Great Depression, a common-man hero, James J. Braddock--a.k.a. the Cinderella Man--was to become one of the most surprising sports legends in history. By the early 1930s, the impoverished ex-prizefighter was seemingly as broken-down, beaten-up and out-of-luck as much of the rest of the American populace who had hit rock bottom. His career appeared to be finished, he was unable to pay the bills, the only thing that mattered to him--his family--was in danger, and he was even forced to go on Public Relief. But deep inside, Jim Braddock never relinquished his determination. Driven by love, honor and an incredible dose the ones who are do of grit, he willed an impossible dream to come true. In a last-chance bid to help his family, Braddock returned to the ring. No one thought he had a shot. However Braddock, fueled by something beyond mere competition, kept winning. Suddenly, the ordinary working man became the mythic athlete. Carrying the hopes and dreams of the disenfranchised... Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When America was on its knees, he brought us to our feet. See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense boxing violence and some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Universal [United States]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 June 2005 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El luchador See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$88,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,320,205, 5 June 2005, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$61,649,911

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$108,539,911
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Before Damon Runyon gave James Braddock his nickname, the term "Cinderella man" was considered an insult similar to "gigolo" today. A Cinderella man was a downtrodden man who met and married a rich "Princess Charming," and allowed his wife to fund their lifestyle. In Platinum Blonde (1931), when a man calls the male lead a Cinderella man, the lead punches the man and tells him that he wears the pants in the marriage. See more »

Goofs

When Jimmy Braddock first shows his wife the $175 his manager gave him, in order for him to train and get back in shape, he holds the money between his index finger and his middle finger. In the next shot, he holds it between his thumb and his index finger. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Joe Gould: Attaboy! Keep him busy!
See more »

Crazy Credits

Before the title appears the following: "In all the history of the boxing game, you'll find no human interest story to compare with the life narrative of James J. Braddock." - Damon Runyon (1936) See more »

Connections

Featured in HBO First Look: Cinderella Man (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Danny Boy/Londonderry Air
(uncredited)
Traditional
Lyrics by Frederick Edward Weatherly
Performed by Paul Giamatti
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

James J. Braddock: Gladiator of the Great Depression
3 June 2005 | by lavatchSee all my reviews

"Cinderella Man" deserves to be placed alongside other great biographical films dealing with the lives and times of great boxers. Such films include "Raging Bull," "The Joe Louis Story," "Ali," "The Hurricane," and "Ring of Fire: The Emile Griffith Story."

These films share in common not just a documentary-like approach to boxing or a superficial biopic. They also portray the human side of a modern gladiator and the culture that produced him. In the case of "Cinderella Man," we are given a detailed and heart-rending portrait of the Great Depression in American. The story of the gentleman pugilist James J. Braddock is the backdrop to the larger drama of Americans' struggle in the 1930s.

Russell Crowe provides a brilliant interpretation of Braddock, capturing the decency of a man whose career as a boxer would appear to have peaked at just the wrong time prior to the Crash of 1929. After that momentous event, Braddock's boxing went into decline just like the lives of millions of Americans. The scenes of Braddock and his family living in squalid conditions and with uncertainty about such basics as heat and electricity were carefully developed in the film. Renée Zellweger was outstanding as Mae, the caring but feisty wife of Braddock. Paul Giamatti was also excellent as Braddock's handler-manager, Joe Gould. Joe tries to keep up appearances by sporting fancy clothes. But in one revealing scene in the film when we see the interior of Joe's ostensibly swanky apartment, there is no fancy furniture other than a dowdy table and some flimsy deck chairs. Everyone is reeling from the Depression. In the depiction of the massive unemployment, the "Hoovervilles" of the homeless residing in Central Park, and the desperate need for Americans for an optimistic icon like Braddock to raise their spirits, the film truly captured the tragedy of the Great American Depression.

The film's director Ron Howard emphasized close-ups throughout the film with uneven results. In many of the boxing sequences, the close-ups and rapid editing made it difficult tell the fighters apart. The close-ups continued even into the domestic scenes and the outdoor sequences depicting Braddock working as a longshoreman. The film's dark cinematography conveyed the bleakness of the Depression years, but it worked against bringing out the buoyant spirit of Braddock himself and the optimism that he instilled in others. As a director, Howard's strength is not in film artistry or technique. As apparent in this and other films, his gift lies in narrative storytelling and the development of dramatic character.

Indeed, the characters and the story were the strong points of "Cinderella Man." Much credit should go to Cliff Hollingsworth for a screenplay that included thoughtful dialogue, humor, and multi-dimensional characters. Daniel Orlandi also merits praise for the brilliant costumes that helped to recreate the period of the early 1930s.

But the heart of this film experience is Russell Crowe's screen portrayal of Braddock. It was the colorful sportswriter and raconteur Damon Runyan who coined the nickname of "Cinderella Man" for Braddock. However, the real James J. Braddock was more than lucky. It was his strength of character in and out of the ring that captivated America. One of the most moving scenes of the film was a heated argument between Braddock and his wife Mae where Braddock insists that even in the most difficult of times, he would refuse to be separated from his children. As a boxer, he was fearless. But he demonstrated even more courage in fighting for family values—a lesson from which we can learn a great deal today in reflecting on this sensitive film.


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