5.8/10
5,765
103 user 104 critic

Dead & Breakfast (2004)

Trailer
1:01 | Trailer
A night at a local bed and breakfast turns into a bloody supernatural fight to the death.

Director:

Matthew Leutwyler

Writers:

Matthew Leutwyler (story), Jun Tan (story) | 2 more credits »
5 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Sisto ... Christian
Erik Palladino ... David
Bianca Lawson ... Kate
Oz Perkins ... Johnny
Ever Carradine ... Sara
Gina Philips ... Melody
Zach Selwyn ... Randall Keith Randall
Miranda Bailey ... Lisa Belmont
Brent David Fraser ... The Drifter
Diedrich Bader ... Chef Henri
David Carradine ... Mr. Wise
Jeffrey Dean Morgan ... The Sheriff
Mark Kelly ... Deputy Enus
Luiggi Debiasse Luiggi Debiasse ... The Gardener
Ric Barbera Ric Barbera ... The Preacher
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Storyline

A night at a local bed and breakfast turns into a bloody supernatural fight to the death.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Heads will roll... See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong horror violence/gore and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Toward the end of the film, Miranda Bailey hands Gina Philips the crossbow with a gentle toss. The first take was a bigger toss, and Gina got hit with the crossbow, chipped a tooth, and split her lip. See more »

Goofs

As the female character fights off the zombies attacking her, the camera shot from the second floor reveals the walls of the staircase are covered in red wallpaper. However, as her friends get into the house and save her on the same staircase, there's no wallpaper but blank walls. See more »

Quotes

Sara: What are they doing?
David: They're dancing!
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Alternate Versions

The Unrated version is the director's cut that was originally given an NC-17 by the MPAA for violence and gore. Nearly 15 seconds was cut out before the film received the R rating, and these included shots of the zombie's partly severed head and more footage of David with the chainsaw in his neck. See more »

Connections

References Evil Dead II (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

Dead Man's Party
Performed by Hillbilly Hellcats
Written by Lance Bakemeyer
Courtesy of Lance Romance Rockabilly Music/BMI
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User Reviews

No Toaster Strudel in the Face for this Horror "Comedy"
7 October 2004 | by stiles-3See all my reviews

Horror comedies are usually much better on paper than on film, which Dead & Breakfast wholeheartedly proves. The first half is a mish-mash of self-consciously 'witty' dialogue and 'hilarious' situations as a group of yappy twenty-somethings throttle in a Winnebago towards Texas for a wedding. But an overnight detour leads them into a den of hillbilly zombies and handmade shotguns, and some semblance of fun, whether it's comedic or not.

With its unnecessary close-ups, terrible acting, and abhorrent hand-held camera use, Dead and Breakfast has all the charm of a first feature by a fanboy with too many ideas and too little experience. (Note that this is actually writer/director Matthew Leutwyler's third feature.) This isn't to say that the movie's bad – there's plenty of gore and creative death scenes to tickle your attention span for 88 minutes. But as a horror film it never finds its voice, and as a comedy, it tries far too hard to ever provoke a good chuckle out of me.

Early on, the lead is taken by Christian, a pill-popping but level-headed mediator played by the always wonderful Jeremy Sisto. But his premature nixing leaves the scattered cast without a den mother. Sara (Ever Carradine, who amazingly looks nothing like a Skolnick) should be leading the pack, but she spends the rest of the film bellowing, 'you've got to be kidding me!' as she wards off zombie attacks. Hardly a leading heroine. The rest of the cast – much better than the headshot-cast prats I see in studio horror pics these days - simply squabble amongst themselves about personal issues while under attack. Then there's the 'comedy': look, drunk guys aren't funny, rude French people aren't funny, and while slipping around in a puddle of gore is funny (see Shaun of the Dead's off-screen tumble by Simon Pegg), when the scene lasts upwards of 30 seconds, one feels pandered to. Even hillbilly zombies aren't funny – isn't that a little too on the nose?

You could do worse than Dead & Breakfast, but if you're looking for a genuine laugh with a good smattering of gore, check out another of Lions Gate's indie horror acquisition, Monster Man. And if you want a good zombie gorefest, stick with Dead Alive or Evil Dead II, which Dead & Breakfast aspires so painfully to be. Because there's nothing funny about desperation, is there?


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Release Date:

20 July 2006 (Singapore) See more »

Also Known As:

Dead and Breakfast See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$500,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (unrated)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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