7.5/10
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108 user 138 critic

Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence (2004)

Inosensu: Innocence (original title)
Trailer
1:11 | Trailer
In the year 2032, Batô, a cyborg detective for the anti-terrorist unit Public Security Section 9, investigates the case of a female robot--one created solely for sexual pleasure--who slaughtered her owner.

Director:

Mamoru Oshii

Writers:

Shirow Masamune (comic "Koukaku-Kidoutai") (as Masamune Shirow), Mamoru Oshii (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
6 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Akio Ôtsuka ... Batou (voice)
Atsuko Tanaka ... Major Motoko Kusanagi (voice)
Kôichi Yamadera ... Togusa (voice)
Tamio Ôki Tamio Ôki ... Section 9 Department Chief Aramaki (voice)
Yutaka Nakano Yutaka Nakano ... Ishikawa (voice)
Naoto Takenaka ... Kim (voice)
Gou Aoba Gou Aoba ... (voice) (as Go Aoba)
Eisuke Asakura Eisuke Asakura ... (voice)
Yuzuru Fujimoto Yuzuru Fujimoto ... (voice)
Emiko Fuku Emiko Fuku ... (voice)
Masao Harada Masao Harada ... (voice)
Minoru Hirano Minoru Hirano ... (voice)
Hiroaki Hirata ... Koga (voice)
Katsunosuke Hori Katsunosuke Hori ... (voice)
Sukekiyo Kameyama Sukekiyo Kameyama ... (voice)
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Storyline

Batô is a living cyborg. His whole body, even his arms and legs, are entirely man-made. What only remains are traces of his brain and the memories of a woman. In an era when the boundary between humans and machines has become infinitely vague, Humans have forgotten that they are humans. This is the debauchery of the lonesome ghost of a man, who nevertheless seeks to retain humanity. Innocence... Is what life is. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When machines learn to feel, who decides what is human... See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence, disturbing images and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The antagonist corporation's name, Locus Solus ("solitary place") is the title of a 1914 French novel by Raymond Roussel. The tableaux vivants in the Doll House also allude to this novel. See more »

Goofs

During the forensics examination, one of the computer screens misspells "research" as "RESAERCH". See more »

Quotes

Bateau: No matter how far a jackass travels, it won't come back a horse.
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Connections

References Max Headroom (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

River of Crystals
Lyrics by Miu Sakamoto
Music by Kenji Kawai
Arranged by Kenji Kawai
Sung by Kimiko Itô
Courtesy of VideoArts Music
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User Reviews

 
Impressive sequel to an anime cyberpunk classic
9 January 2005 | by Sentinel-15See all my reviews

A new Japanese cyberpunk masterpiece that makes the original GiTS look primitive by comparison. Mamoru Oshii and his crew did a masterful job creating a worthy successor to their 1995 adaptation of Masamune Shirow's original manga.

As in the original movie – as well as in that other quintessential proto-cyberpunk movie, Blade Runner – the movie explores human nature in a world that is becoming more technological all the time, to a point where people ARE technology, the boundaries are rapidly fading away. What does it mean to be human? If we join with technology, would we become something else? Should we welcome it, or fear it? Will humanity lose or gain from the changes?

After the events of the first movie, Major Motoko Kusanagi has seemingly disappeared; focus of the second movie has shifted to Bateau, who is still working for the secret government "Section 9". This is by no means a bad thing, since Bateau is at least as interesting a character as Kusanagi ever was. Going beyond your basic cyberpunk cyborg tough guy with attitude, he is very intelligent, and has some nice human touches (like the dog he loves taking care of). At various points he and other characters routinely indulge in philosophical debate, often quoting literature, from Milton to biblical psalm verses. Just to say this isn't your typical sci-fi action movie, although there is some action, and when it comes, it's fast, brutal & violent.

The actual plot involves an incident with a sophisticated robotic "pleasure model", if you will, gone berserk. The investigation leads us through the darker parts of near-future Japanese society, including yakuza, companies with questionable ethics, and mysterious hackers.

Visually, the movie is stunningly beautiful, using a combination of traditional cell animation and state of the art CGI. Many of the movie's backgrounds are gorgeous to just look at; even dark and dirty back alleys are shown so rich in color and detail, you could gaze at them all day. Like in the first movie, Oshii lets the movie halt at times, immersing the viewer in the richly detailed world he created. Many of the computer screen readouts resemble those seen in Oshii's "Avalon" a lot – which again is not a bad thing, as they look both high-tech and yet elegant & artistic.

Last but not least, the music by Kenji Kawai is hauntingly beautiful, adding more layers to the sophisticated richness of it all.

I cannot recommend this movie highly enough. Anyone who likes science fiction, anyone who was blown away by movies such as Blade Runner and of course the first "Ghost in the Shell" (which you should see before watching this one) will enjoy this.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese | Cantonese | English

Release Date:

24 September 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

JPY2,000,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$317,722, 19 September 2004

Gross USA:

$1,043,896

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$9,789,651
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS-ES | Dolby Digital EX

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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