7.5/10
10,819
50 user 85 critic

Last Life in the Universe (2003)

Ruang rak noi nid mahasan (original title)
A suicidal, obsessively compulsive Japanese librarian is forced to lie low in Thailand with a pot-smoking woman coping with the recent loss of her sister.

Director:

Pen-Ek Ratanaruang
8 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tadanobu Asano ... Kenji
Sinitta Boonyasak Sinitta Boonyasak ... Noi
Laila Boonyasak Laila Boonyasak ... Nid
Yutaka Matsushige ... Yukio
Riki Takeuchi ... Takashi
Takashi Miike ... Yakuza
Yoji Tanaka Yoji Tanaka ... Yakuza (as Yohji Tanaka)
Sakichi Sato Sakichi Sato ... Yakuza
Thiti Rhumorn Thiti Rhumorn ... Jon
Junko Nakazawa Junko Nakazawa ... Librarian
Akiko Anraku Akiko Anraku ... Japanese Housewife
Nortioshi Urano Nortioshi Urano ... Salaryman
Phimchanok Nala Dube Phimchanok Nala Dube ... Girl in Jon's Apartment
Ampon Rattanawong Ampon Rattanawong ... Jon's Underling
Jakrarin Sanitti Jakrarin Sanitti ... Jon's Underling
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Storyline

A mysterious, obsessive-compulsive, suicidal Japanese man living in Bangkok, Thailand, is thrown together with a Thai woman through a tragic chain of events. The woman is everything he is not. He is a neat freak who keeps his dishes washed and his books neatly stacked and categorized. She dresses like a slob, smokes pot and never picks anything up. It's a match that somehow works, though. Slowly and entertainingly, more is revealed about the Japanese man and why he's suicidal and living in Bangkok. Written by Wise Kwai

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, sexual content, language and drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The original script was written by the director before he made "Monrak Transistor". However, he decided to shelve it for a while. When he decided to make another film, he gave this script to Prabda Yoon and Prabda rewrote it. See more »

Connections

References Koroshiya 1 (2001) See more »

User Reviews

Get busy living...
23 June 2006 | by CosmoJonesSee all my reviews

Pen-Ek Ratanaruang's gently observed tale of the love that develops between a suicidal Japanese librarian and a streetwise Thai woman who meet under tragic circumstances is hypnotically absorbing. Shot in a lyrical and languid style by Christopher Doyle, who abandons his trademark vivid and hyper-real use of colour, the piece has been given a muted, naturalistic look. This suits the subdued tone and measured pace of the film which focuses on emotion rather than action. Ratanaruang, describes Last Life in the Universe as his most tender film, and this is as good a word as any to describe the relationship of Tadanobu Asano's Kenji, and Sinitta Boonyasak's Noi.

After unhappy fate has brought them together Noi and Kenji find sanctuary in each other. Kenji, deeply introspective, disconnected from reality, and suicidal, is literally saved from himself by Noi, whose joie de vivre, though dampened by grief, is infectious. Noi brings energy, colour, and most importantly life, to Kenji's dull and organised universe. Kenji brings a sense of order and balance to Noi's chaotic life, and his tranquil non-intrusive presence helps Noi to cope with her grief and the resulting sense of loneliness. As Ratanaruang claims, it is very tenderly done, and this is translated into the performance of both leads.

Asano, hugely famous in Japan for playing offbeat characters, brings a restrained sense of wonder to Kenji whose growing appetite for life is communicated in simple gestures such as a draw on a cigarette, or a ruffle of his hair. Boonyasak, in what is a very difficult first role, does exceptionally well to convince as a woman who though filled with grief has an irrepressible lust for life. Part of what fascinates the audience about both characters is the ambiguity that surrounds them. They are both without a history, especially Kenji who appears to have been linked to the Yakuza, and though it is never made clear why he is in Thailand there is an implication that he may have a murky past in Japan.

Reduced to the basics then Last Life in the Universe is a simple love story with very familiar themes; opposites attract, and the redemptive power of love. That this well-trodden path is followed again here takes nothing away from the film however, as though the story unfolds slowly it is well paced, well acted, and sensuously shot. The only potential weakness was Ratanaruang's inclusion of the comic gangster element (actor/director Takashi Miike plays a mob boss bent on revenge) which could very easily have been Last Life in the Universe's Achilles' heel, upsetting the tone and balance. As it turns out the Yakuza scenes work very well. In the context of the story Miike, and his henchmen do not seem out of place, and the absurd humour that they inject provides a necessary distraction from the studied inaction of Kenji and Noi. Overall then the elements combine to make Last Life in the Universe an unmissable film.


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Details

Country:

Thailand | Japan | Netherlands

Language:

Thai | Japanese | English

Release Date:

8 August 2003 (Thailand) See more »

Also Known As:

Last Life in the Universe See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$5,833, 8 August 2004

Gross USA:

$32,014

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$63,095
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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