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In the Land of the Cactus (1913)

Estelle Royster induces by auto suggestions the thought that she has the white plague, and gradually hut surely acts upon her own suggestion, until we find her an invalid. Her physician, ... See full summary »

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Ramon
Mary Ryan ...
Estelle Royster
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Bob Armabile
Richard Wangermann ...
(as Richard Wangemann)
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Storyline

Estelle Royster induces by auto suggestions the thought that she has the white plague, and gradually hut surely acts upon her own suggestion, until we find her an invalid. Her physician, not understanding the case, orders her to the land of cactus. Her father, who worships her, takes her to the Mexican border and there they establish themselves with one, Henry Arce, a very wealthy cattleman and ranch owner and incidentally an old friend of Royster's. Shortly after arriving, Arce's two favorite foremen meet Estelle and both fall in love with her in their own ways. Estelle favors Bob Armabile, the American vaquero, but is fascinated by Ramon, a white Mexican. Bob's suit is favored by Estelle's father, but with love and everything that can be had for money, Estelle continues to sink as days go by. Ramon's love gives him power to see that the girl's illness is purely mental. He decides to steal her and take her into the mountains and force her to regain her health. He does so, and after a... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

29 March 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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He is so seldom theatrical that some think him "queer"
26 August 2017 | by See all my reviews

Of all the pictures today we enjoyed this the most, and liked it chiefly for its freshness and its difference. Romaine Fielding is individual, but at the same time natural and human in his pictures. He is so seldom theatrical that some think him "queer." It would be good if there were more queer producers and more scenario writers as original. It is so apparently earnest that one doesn't suspect the essential comedy in it until he sees the ending. The action and the acting, the characters and what they do, the way the scenes are chosen and everything about the picture seem quite fresh. The audience watched it with the closest interest and seemed to like it much. Romaine Fielding plays the chief role, a Mexican who has fallen in love with an American girl who thinks she is sick and takes an original way to cure her, which succeeds. Mary Ryan plays the girl, and Robyn Adair and Richard Wangeman have roles. - The Moving Picture World, April 12, 1913


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