7.1/10
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3 user 1 critic

Small Town Ecstasy (2002)

| Documentary | TV Movie
Scott's a 40-year-old preacher's son and a raver, enamored by marijuana and the synthetic drug Ecstasy, who puts his children's future at risk through his lassez faire approach to child-rearing.

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Scott's a 40-year-old preacher's son and a raver, enamored by marijuana and the synthetic drug Ecstasy, who puts his children's future at risk through his lassez faire approach to child-rearing.

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"There isn't much to do in this city, so we might as well drug ourselves"
26 April 2004 | by See all my reviews

This documentary follows a family in Calaveras, Northern California. A bleached-blond dad,40, his ex-wife, and their 4 children from 13 to army age, for a period of over half a year. The dad uses ecstasy, and goes to the raves. Discovering this had been to much for his wife, thus they were separated on the point where they started to make this documentary. "There is not much to do in this city, so we might as well drug ourselves" is a comment that tried to be light in the beginning - if in California they find "nothing to do" one might ask how many young people do ecstasy then in the states where there really isn't much to do, such as Montana or Utah. 1 of 8 teenagers in USA has tried ecstasy. It can cause a lot of negative things - dependency, problems for health, problems in family, society etc. But numbers and government's educative brochures are onlly numbers and warnings - so following one family where there are users of it, for a certain period of time, can probably show a lot better what it can really cause, to real people and not just numbers. The documentary feels a bit long (over 90 minutes) but a lot of 'slower' material feels appropriate - the looks on people's face in certain moments, some shoots of rave life, and of course things such as the family members explaining why they use(d) ecstasy.


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