7.0/10
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4 user 2 critic

Cry for Bobo (2002)

Frantic knockabout tragedy ensues when Bobo is sent to clown prison for committing a daring but silly crime. Can he escape in time to prevent his family from bringing shame on all clowndom?

Director:

David Cairns

Writer:

David Cairns
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6 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
James Bryce James Bryce ... Shopkeeper
Niall Greig Fulton ... The Policeman
Mark McDonnell Mark McDonnell ... Bobo
Steven McNicoll Steven McNicoll ... Coco
Tracey Robertson Tracey Robertson ... Betty
Tracey Robertson Tracey Robertson ... Betty
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Storyline

Frantic knockabout tragedy ensues when Bobo is sent to clown prison for committing a daring but silly crime. Can he escape in time to prevent his family from bringing shame on all clowndom?

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Genres:

Short

User Reviews

Odd Man Out
11 March 2003 | by LordLucanSee all my reviews

One of the legacies of post-war British cinema is social realism. Another is the gangster film. The former is championed by affiliates of the Leigh-Loach-`Play for Today' school. The latter by those who mistake Tarantino (et al) for Melies. I have no quarrel with any of them, but allow me a big `Thank Christ!' for CRY FOR BOBO. It's so rare to find a film that kicks out conventions (especially in this most convention-ridden of film production areas: the state-funded short film) and so opens the gates to a flood of cinematic imagination. And CRY FOR BOBO delivers this in aces; a hyper-kinetic blast of (caricatured? Grosz grotesquerie? Cartoon-like? Downright surreal? Felliniesque?) clowning around. that is: literally clowning around. Belly laughs are the order of the day here. And the director has the audacity to take the pith out of both schools, with scenes of faux-gritty social realism (albeit with clowns.) and, without wanting to spoil the ending, High Peckinpahisms. The creators of this film are undoubtedly cine-literate and anarchic individuals, yet with the discipline to strike an absolutely correct balance - especially in terms of the (arresting) performances - and implement a streamlined, confident, professional product. Good on Tartan Shorts for supporting this! We need to see more from David Cairns and his team!


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Details

Country:

UK

Release Date:

7 June 2002 (USA) See more »

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Color:

Color
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