5.3/10
35,602
253 user 133 critic

Hollywood Homicide (2003)

PG-13 | | Action, Comedy, Crime | 13 June 2003 (USA)
Trailer
2:30 | Trailer
Two LAPD detectives who moonlight in other fields investigate the murder of an up-and-coming rap group.

Director:

Ron Shelton
1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Harrison Ford ... Sgt. Joe Gavilan
Josh Hartnett ... Det. K.C. Calden
Lena Olin ... Ruby
Bruce Greenwood ... Lt. Bennie Macko
Isaiah Washington ... Antoine Sartain
Lolita Davidovich ... Cleo Ricard
Keith David ... Leon
Master P ... Julius Armas
Gladys Knight ... Olivia Robidoux
Lou Diamond Phillips ... Wanda
Meredith Scott Lynn ... I.A. Detective Jackson
Tom Todoroff ... I.A. Detective Zino
James MacDonald ... Danny Broome
Kurupt ... K-Ro
André Benjamin ... Silk Brown (as Andre Benjamin)
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Storyline

When not solving murders in Tinseltown, Detective Joe Gavilan and his rookie partner Kasey Calden both moonlight in other fields: Gavilan sells real estate (poorly), and Calden aspires to become an actor (Brando, namely). Assigned to the vicious in-club slaying of a promising young rap act, the two detective delve into the recording industry where they hope to find answers - ideally ones that also come with property buyers or auditions. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When time is running out, one shot is all you get See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence, sexual situations and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The ringtone for Joe's phone is 'My Girl', the song, written and performed by Smokey Robinson. In the third act, Robinson plays a cab driver whose cab Joe commandeers and makes him ride along. See more »

Goofs

When KC arrests the two men "stealing" Gavilan's car, we see both suspects go down to the ground twice, once from the front and a second time from behind. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Shooting Practice Announcer: Shooters step up to the 20 yard line.
[K.C. has trouble shooting his target during shooting practice, so Joe shoots his and K.C.'s at the same time]
K.C.: Thanks Joe.
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Crazy Credits

Smokey Robinson plays the Taxi Cab driver of the Cab that Harrison Ford's Character commandeers towards the final chase scenes. See more »

Connections

Featured in WatchMojo: Top 10 Movie Fights on Rooftops (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Funkytown
(1976)
Written by Steven Greenberg
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User Reviews

Harrison Homicide
9 April 2004 | by DarthBillSee all my reviews

I've always been a fan of Harrison Ford and odds are I always will be, regardless of what comes out of his personal life now. Considering how Hollywood can screw a man up, Harrison still ranks as one of the few to have successfully held his head together. That and I usually find something entertaining his films. It's hard not to be entertained by him in the old Star Wars films, where he was hilarious as Han Solo, or to root/feel for him in the Indiana Jones trilogy and films like "Blade Runner", "Witness", the Jack Ryan films, "The Fugitive" and "Air Force One".

Thing is, "Witness" marked the turning point of Harrison's career in which he would mature into the modern day quiet, reluctant hero. Understandably, after playing this role again and again for about 20 years Ford would naturally want to go back to playing things a little funnier than he had previously been allowed. It's a bit of a shame that he picked such a weak script for a return to comedy. All in all, it's just an excuse to let Harrison reprise his Han Solo persona as an older man. But in the opinions of some, his age dried him out, preventing him from being as funny as he used to be.

This one tries very hard to be both apart OF the mismatched buddy cop genre AND to make fun of it. As a result, it never quite realizes it's potentially funny premise or even serve as usual time filler.

Ford plays Joe Gavilan, a cop working real estate on the side and Josh Hartnett is his younger partner KC Calden, who works a yoga class on the side, sleeps with his customers and is also an aspiring actor. They get assigned to solve the murder of an up and coming rap group and are repeatedly dogged by Bruce Greenwood as Ford's nemesis. The cliche of Josh's dad being a cop who got killed by way of his partner could have been left on the cutting room floor.

Ford and Josh do the young cop/old cop bit as well as anyone else, but Ford deserves a better than this, and after "Black Hawk Down" Josh should be more picky about his vehicles. The only real comic highlight is when they're being interrogated and are either mouthing off or playing quiet. This is the only gem in an otherwise dull film.

Here's hoping they both make better decisions in the future.


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Details

Official Sites:

Columbia Tristar [France]

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 June 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Two Cops See more »

Filming Locations:

Beverly Hills, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$75,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,112,632, 15 June 2003

Gross USA:

$30,940,691

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$51,142,659
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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