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Seabiscuit (2003)

PG-13 | | Drama, History, Sport | 25 July 2003 (USA)
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True story of the undersized Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted not only the spirits of the team behind it but also those of their nation.

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Writers:

(book), (screenplay)
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1,280 ( 746)
Nominated for 7 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David McCullough ... Narrator
... Charles Howard
... Bicycle Supervisor
... Tom Smith
... Steamer Owner
... Car Customer
... Annie Howard
David Doty ... Land Broker
Carl M. Craig ... Sam (as Kingston DuCoeur)
... Mr. Pollard
... Mrs. Pollard
... Young Red Pollard
... Pollard Child
Noah Luke ... Pollard Child
... Pollard Child
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Storyline

It's the Depression, and everyone needs to hold onto a dream to get them through the bad times. Car maker Charles Howard is no different, he who is trying to rebuild his life after the tragic death of his only child and the resulting end of his first marriage. With second wife Marcela at his side, Charles wants to get into horse racing and ends up with a team of underdogs who are also chasing their own dream. The first is trainer Tom Smith, who has a natural instinct to spot the capabilities of horses. The second is the horse Tom chooses for Charles, Seabiscuit, an unconventional choice as despite his pedigreed lineage, Seabiscuit is small at fifteen and a half hands tall with a slight limp. But Tom can see something in Seabiscuit's nature to make him a winner, if only Seabiscuit can be retrained from his inbred losing ways. And third is the jockey they decide to hire, Johnny "Red" Pollard, so nicknamed because of his hair color. Like Tom, Red has always shown a natural way with ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A long shot becomes a legend. See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual situations and violent sports-related images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

25 July 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Alma de héroes  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$87,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$20,854,735, 27 July 2003, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$120,277,854, 5 February 2004

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$148,336,445
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Red Pollard (Toby Maguire) affectionately calls Seabiscuit "Pops". This was the real nickname Pollard gave the horse since Seabiscuit was considered "old" during his time as a major thoroughbred racer. See more »

Goofs

During the sequence in Mexico, there is a close shot of a mariachi trumpeter playing a mouthpiece with an adapter (sleeve) invented by Bob Reeves in the 1970's. See more »

Quotes

[displaying Seabiscuit's jockey silks]
Marcela Howard: You don't think the "H" is too big?
Charles Howard: You seen the size of our jockey?
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Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: Scarlett Johansson/Wiz Khalifa (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Call to the Post
Performed by Jay Cohen
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User Reviews

 
It wears its sentimental heart firmly on its fetlock.
30 March 2009 | by See all my reviews

As the depression era kicks in, Americans were grasping for any sort of inspiration they could get, enter equine supreme, Seabiscuit. Considered broken down, too small and untrainable, Seabiscuit went on to become a bastion of great racehorse's, and in the process bringing solace to those closest to it.

Back in 2003 upon its initial release, critics were very divided as to the merits of Seabiscuit as a picture. Some were concerned that this adaptation from Laura Hillenbrand's highly thought of novel missed too many crucial elements, others were merely touting the tired old charge of the film purely baiting Oscar {something that is levelled at every film in history about hope and second chances}, the more astute critics of the time however lauded it as the delightful and inspiring piece it is.

It would be churlish of me to not agree that Seabiscuit is laced with sentiment, rookie director Gary Ross barely wastes a chance to tug the heart strings and paint an evocative sequence, but if you have got it in you to accept this true story for its base emotional point, then it is one hell of a wonderful experience. Seabiscuit is not just about the equine beauty of the picture, it's also a fusion of three mens personal wavering, who for one reason or another need the horse for far more important crutches than those provided by financial gain, make no bones about it, Seabiscuit is a very human drama. Knowing how the picture will end never once becomes a problem, because the historical accuracy in the story makes one yearn for that grandiose ending, one to gladden the heart in the way it must have done to thousands upon thousands of Americans back in the day.

Ross wisely chooses to filter in as much realism as he possibly can, archive stills and narration serve as exceptional points of worth to the narrative structure. Then there is the first rate cast to fully form the emotional complexities that Seabiscuit provides. Jeff Bridges, Tobey Maguire {waif like}, Chris Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, top American jockey Gary Stevens and a splendidly jaunty William H Macy, all can rightly feel proud of their respective work on this picture. But it's with the thundering race sequences that Seabiscuit really triumphs best, magnificent beasts hurtling around the race track is excellently handled by Ross and his cinematographer, John Schwartzman, whilst a nod of approval must go to the sound departments efforts, it's definitely one to give your sub-woofer a work out.

Seabiscuit was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning none, perhaps the Academy also felt like those critics who thought it was trying too hard for a Golden Statue? But now after the dust has settled some years later, it pays to revisit Seabiscuit and judge it on its own emotional terms, for it's a tremendously well crafted picture that is of course as inspirational as it most assuredly is tender, a fine fine picture indeed. 9/10


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