7.3/10
61,896
458 user 173 critic

Seabiscuit (2003)

PG-13 | | Drama, History, Sport | 25 July 2003 (USA)
Trailer
1:15 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON TV
ON DISC
ALL
True story of the undersized Depression-era racehorse whose victories lifted not only the spirits of the team behind it but also those of their nation.

Director:

Gary Ross

Writers:

Laura Hillenbrand (book), Gary Ross (screenplay)
Nominated for 7 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David McCullough ... Narrator
Jeff Bridges ... Charles Howard
Paul Vincent O'Connor ... Bicycle Supervisor
Chris Cooper ... Tom Smith
Michael Ensign ... Steamer Owner
James Keane ... Car Customer
Valerie Mahaffey ... Annie Howard
David Doty David Doty ... Land Broker
Carl M. Craig Carl M. Craig ... Sam (as Kingston DuCoeur)
Michael O'Neill ... Mr. Pollard
Annie Corley ... Mrs. Pollard
Michael Angarano ... Young Red Pollard
Cameron Bowen ... Pollard Child
Noah Luke Noah Luke ... Pollard Child
Mariah Bess ... Pollard Child
Edit

Storyline

It's the Depression, and everyone needs to hold onto a dream to get them through the bad times. Car maker Charles Howard is no different, he who is trying to rebuild his life after the tragic death of his only child and the resulting end of his first marriage. With second wife Marcela at his side, Charles wants to get into horse racing and ends up with a team of underdogs who are also chasing their own dream. The first is trainer Tom Smith, who has a natural instinct to spot the capabilities of horses. The second is the horse Tom chooses for Charles, Seabiscuit, an unconventional choice as despite his pedigreed lineage, Seabiscuit is small at fifteen and a half hands tall with a slight limp. But Tom can see something in Seabiscuit's nature to make him a winner, if only Seabiscuit can be retrained from his inbred losing ways. And third is the jockey they decide to hire, Johnny "Red" Pollard, so nicknamed because of his hair color. Like Tom, Red has always shown a natural way with ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A long shot becomes a legend. See more »

Genres:

Drama | History | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual situations and violent sports-related images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 July 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Alma de héroes See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$87,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$20,854,735, 27 July 2003, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$120,277,854, 5 February 2004

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$148,336,445
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

While the movie describes War Admiral as being a huge horse close to eighteen hands tall, the real-life War Admiral was well known for being one of the smallest sons of Man o' War. War Admiral was actually the same size as Seabiscuit, which was approximately fifteen hands tall. See more »

Goofs

When Tick-Tock McGlaughlin (William H. Macy) commented on Seabiscuit's winning streak, which occurred in 1937, he mentioned "Hope and Crosby." Bob Hope and Bing Crosby didn't become widely known as a team until the "Road to Singapore" was released in 1940. See more »

Quotes

Tom Smith: You know, you don't throw a whole life away just 'cause he's banged up a little.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Curb Your Enthusiasm: The Bare Midriff (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Joy in the Salvation Army
Written by William B. Bradbury (as William Bradbury)
Performed by The Salvation Army Southern California Ensemble
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Loved it - a wonderful uplifting (but not cheesy) story
22 February 2005 | by jacqsantoraSee all my reviews

I have not read the book or anything about the story this movie was based on - I might have to now since I enjoyed the movie so much. The point of my writing this is to say: if you haven't read the book, you will probably like this movie. I'm sure the book portrayed so much more, but I don't think you can directly compare movies and books. In most cases, I have never loved a movie as much as a book - but that doesn't mean the movie should be disregarded. In some cases emotion can be better portrayed on film. (please note that all my "quotes" are paraphrased from what i remember and only set aside in " " to distinguish it from my writing).

That said, I completely disagree with the first reviewer above who did read the book first. I really DID get the message about what Seabiscuit represented at that time: a second chance, rising above expectations against all odds, and most of all - HOPE. When I told someone I just saw Seabiscuit, they said, "oh, that's about the horse, right?" and I said, "no, it's really a story of hope and rising above tough circumstances - but there is a horse in it." I was surprised at how much history and how many images of the depression were gracefully woven into Seabiscuit. I thought it worked very well and added to the realism of the film.

I also definitely understood that Red Pollard's family was wealthy, and that they lost everything in the depression. It's pretty obvious - the whole family is shown around a great big dinner table in a very nice house; his father even buys him his own horse. Next time you see them, they are basically living out of their car with a whole bunch of other folks doing the same - a kind of depression era makeshift camp.

It's also made clear later on in the movie that he never saw his family again - there are auditory flashbacks to his parents saying they will call him; how he almost dumps all his books into the water; the fact that next time we see him he's a young man and there's no mention of his family ever again in the movie. Seems like they just disappeared - and they did. Red also displays anger and frustration that is noticed by other characters. To me, this points to a sense of abandonment by his family.

Also unlike the other reviewer, I DID care a lot about the race with War Admiral - in fact, i almost had to just skip to the end first because I was so nervous about it! This was NOT just a story of profit. In fact, it never seemed like that was Howard's goal at all - his goal was to prove that the underdog can and will win - to prove that heart and spirit mattered as much as (or even more than) wealth and breeding. That seemed to be the point of the match race with War Admiral.

This is a story of rising above profit to reach an even greater goal. It's an uplifting story, as you can see in the crowd's faces as Howard tells them, "just because he's beaten down by a nose, doesn't mean he's out." and "When the little guy doesn't know he's the little guy, he can do great big things." You can picture the men and women, unemployed and hungry, telling themselves these same words. Things will get better; we may be down, but we're not out. In the words of Tom Smith, "You can't throw a whole life away, just because it's banged up a bit." Red's words at the end are touching as well, "seabiscuit fixed us, and in a sense we fixed each other.'" Red overcame his anger, his fear, his sense of hopelessness. So did Seabiscuit. And if they can, so can you.


28 of 36 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 458 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending Movies With Prime Video

Enjoy a night in with these popular movies available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed