8.0/10
410,613
883 user 248 critic

Big Fish (2003)

Trailer
2:28 | Trailer
A frustrated son tries to determine the fact from fiction in his dying father's life.

Director:

Tim Burton

Writers:

Daniel Wallace (novel), John August (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
800 ( 16)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 68 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ewan McGregor ... Ed Bloom - Young
Albert Finney ... Ed Bloom - Senior
Billy Crudup ... Will Bloom
Jessica Lange ... Sandra Bloom - Senior
Helena Bonham Carter ... Jenny - Young / Jenny - Senior / The Witch
Alison Lohman ... Sandra Bloom - Young
Robert Guillaume ... Dr. Bennett - Senior
Marion Cotillard ... Josephine Bloom
Matthew McGrory ... Karl the Giant
David Denman ... Don Price - Age 18-22
Missi Pyle ... Mildred
Loudon Wainwright III ... Beamen (as Loudon Wainwright)
Ada Tai ... Ping
Arlene Tai ... Jing
Steve Buscemi ... Norther Winslow
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Storyline

United Press International journalist Will Bloom and his French freelance photojournalist wife Josephine Bloom, who is pregnant with their first child, leave their Paris base to return to Will's hometown of Ashton, Alabama on the news that his father, Edward Bloom, stricken with cancer, will soon die, he being taken off chemotherapy treatment. Although connected indirectly through Will's mother/Edward's wife, Sandra Bloom, Will has been estranged from his father for three years since his and Josephine's wedding. Will's issue with his father is the fanciful tales Edward has told of his life all his life, not only to Will but the whole world. As a child when Edward was largely absent as a traveling salesman, Will believed those stories, but now realizes that he does not know his father, who, as he continues to tell these stories, he will never get to know unless Edward comes clean with the truth before he dies. On the brink of his own family life beginning, Will does not want to be the ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

An adventure as big as life itself.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for a fight scene, some images of nudity and a suggestive reference | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Daniel Wallace: The author of the original book appears as Sandra's economics professor at Auburn. See more »

Goofs

When Edward leaves Spectre, there are fresh tire tracks in the grass, probably from the crane being used to film the scene. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Young Ed Bloom: There are some fish that cannot be caught. It's not that they are faster or stronger than other fish, they're just touched by something extra.
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Crazy Credits

The Columbia logo runs in reverse. See more »

Connections

References Edward Scissorhands (1990) See more »

Soundtracks

Twice the Love
Written by Danny Elfman and John August
Produced by Danny Elfman
Pre-records performed by Bobbi Page and Candice Rumph
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User Reviews

Lying as an Art Form
8 August 2004 | by Low ManSee all my reviews

What do you say about this movie?

I am at a total loss to describe it. The concept itself, a son tries to come to terms with his dying father that he knows nothing about but an enormous catalog of unbelievable stories, doesn't sound very promising. It sounds like a tired old formula, and I expected such when the rental started playing

It's not.

Werewolves, giants, witches, siamese twins, bank robbers, hidden cities, sirens, etc. are all present in the fantasy, but they seem unremarkably to be part of the life of an otherwise ordinary traveling salesman. Whether they really are or not is never made completely clear, but that's the rub.

I once read a review by Harlan Ellison in which the main point was how a well told lie illuminates the truth in far better clarity than a simple recitation of the facts ever can. At one point in the film, the questing son remarks to his bed-ridden father that he's heard all of his stories thousands of times, and he has know idea who his father really is. The father's reply is, `I've never been anybody but me from the day I was born. If you don't know who I am, that's your failing, not mine.' Later investigations make the point clearer. I'll bet Ellison loved this movie. It is an extraordinary lie.

Did I like the film? You bet. It's Tim Burton's best work without a doubt. Is it for everybody? Probably not. Many will find it confusing and pointless, but good fantasy is like that. All I can say is, relax and let it happen. You won't regret it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Sony Pictures Entertainment

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Cantonese

Release Date:

9 January 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Big Fish See more »

Filming Locations:

USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$70,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$207,377, 14 December 2003

Gross USA:

$66,809,693

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$123,218,424
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS (8 channels)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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