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Angels in America 

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Playwright Tony Kushner adapts his political epic about the AIDS crisis during the mid-1980s and centers the story around a group of separate but connected individuals.
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1,941 ( 94)

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1   Unknown  
2003   Unknown  
Won 5 Golden Globes. Another 57 wins & 42 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Al Pacino ...  Roy Cohn 7 episodes, 2003
Mary-Louise Parker ...  Harper Pitt 7 episodes, 2003
Jeffrey Wright ...  Mr. Lies / ... 7 episodes, 2003
Justin Kirk ...  Prior Walter / ... 7 episodes, 2003
Ben Shenkman ...  Louis Ironson 7 episodes, 2003
Meryl Streep ...  Hannah Pitt / ... 7 episodes, 2003
Patrick Wilson ...  Joe Pitt 6 episodes, 2003
Emma Thompson ...  Nurse Emily / ... 6 episodes, 2003
James Cromwell ...  Roy's Doctor 5 episodes, 2003
Brian Markinson ...  Martin Heller 5 episodes, 2003
Robin Weigert ...  Mormon Mother 4 episodes, 2003
Melissa Wilder Melissa Wilder ...  Louis's Sister 4 episodes, 2003
David Zayas ...  Super 4 episodes, 2003
Fatima Da Silva Fatima Da Silva ...  Cousin Doris 4 episodes, 2003
Kevin 'Flotilla DeBarge' Joseph Kevin 'Flotilla DeBarge' Joseph ...  Singer in Church 4 episodes, 2003
Sterling Brown Sterling Brown ...  Orderly 4 episodes, 2003
Florence Kastriner ...  Louis' Mother 4 episodes, 2003
Lisa LeGuillou Lisa LeGuillou ...  Nurse 4 episodes, 2003
Howard Pinhasik ...  Louis' Father 4 episodes, 2003
Shawn Bartels Shawn Bartels ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Brian Dougherty Brian Dougherty ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Mary Esbjornson Mary Esbjornson ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Barbara Fusco Barbara Fusco ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Serafina Martino Serafina Martino ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Steven Edward Moore Steven Edward Moore ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Christopher Schuman Christopher Schuman ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Reldalee Wagner Reldalee Wagner ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
Matthew Yohn Matthew Yohn ...  Mennonite Choir Members 4 episodes, 2003
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Storyline

God has abandoned Heaven. It's 1985: the Reagans are in the White House and Death swings the scythe of AIDS. In Manhattan, Prior Walter tells Lou, his lover of four years, he's ill; Lou bolts. As disease and loneliness ravage Prior, guilt invades Lou. Joe Pitt, an attorney who is Mormon and Republican, is pushed by right-wing fixer Roy Cohn toward a job at the Justice Department. Both Pitt and Cohn are in the closet: Pitt out of shame and religious turmoil, Cohn to preserve his power and access. Pitt's wife Harper is strung out on Valium, aching to escape a sexless marriage. An angel invites Prior to be a prophet in death. Pitt's mother and Belize, a close friend, help Prior choose. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The messenger has arrived.

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Romance

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

HBO

Country:

USA | Italy

Language:

English | Hebrew | Aramaic | Yiddish | French

Release Date:

7 December 2003 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Angels in America See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(6 parts)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The play's original subtitle ("A Gay Fantasia on National Themes") is based on the rarely used subtitle for George Bernard Shaw's play "Heartbreak House," which is "A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes." See more »

Goofs

The Coke can from which Joe drinks in the 1985 time setting (outside Justice with Lou) has the label "Coca-Cola Classic", rather than "Coke" or "New Coke" (introduced on 23 April that year). The design of the can is from 2002, not 1985. See more »

Quotes

Roy Cohn: You don't know what all I know. *I* don't know what all I know. Half this shit I make up and I'm still right, learned that in the 50's.
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Crazy Credits

Person Generally in Charge of Everything Aaron Geller See more »

Connections

Spoofs The Wizard of Oz (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

Shall We Gather At The River?
(hymn written in 1864)
Music and Lyrics by Robert Lowry (1826-1899)
Performed by Meryl Streep and choir
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User Reviews

If you meet some requirements, you may find it the most moving thing you ever saw
25 September 2004 | by MartinPhSee all my reviews

It seems to me that to be able to experience the full depth of this production, you need to meet a few requirements. First, you need to know that this is a PLAY. Like in any play, texts are delivered that you will not easily hear in everyday life (nobody makes up 'Antebellum Insufficiently Developed Sexorgans' as an alternative interpretation of AIDS during a split second in mid-conversation). Shakespeare isn't realistic in that way, Oscar Wilde isn't, Ibsen isn't, and nor is Tony Kushner. All of them are however extremely realistic in that they highlight essential aspects of the human condition in ways no other medium can achieve. Second, you need an ability to look beyond the surface. Reading reviews of AinA I'm stunned at how simplistically literal some people take it (maybe that explains why you've got Bush for president over there?). This play isn't about gays, it isn't about AIDS, it isn't about Jews and it isn't about Mormons. Its theme is the necessity for people to change, the scariness of change, while most of us would prefer to just let things stay as they are. That's what Louis Ironson wants and makes him run away from his sick lover (consider that: the superficially leftist intellectual is in fact a thorough conservative, more so than the apparently conservative Joe Pitt). That's what the angels want: unchangeable status quo; all the human history making tempted their god to leave heaven, and they want him back. This is the crux of AinA's undeniable political agenda: it sets out to show how conservatism of necessity thwarts and corrupts human nature. Oh yes, that's a third requirement: you really shouldn't belong to that curious group of people who consider the bible a god-given record of factual happenings rather than a piece of ancient mythology: you are likely to be shocked. Kushner's fantasies on biblical themes are very original indeed, and fit into a long tradition of reinterpreting ancient mythology in contemporary contexts. The church could learn a thing or two from him.

Personally, I was very deeply moved by the experience of watching this (as I was by the play nearly ten years ago). I'm sure that, unlike some people seem to think, you don't need to be like the gay men portrayed in AinA to be able to stand it, let alone like it (a ridiculous notion anyway: as a gay man I constantly watch movies about heterosexuals, and am often touched by them). I'm a Dutchman, I know New York only from a few brief visits, and though I'm gay my lifestyle has very little in common with that of the men in AinA; none of that prevented me from being deeply engrossed in this story. Its themes, as said, are universal (if you doubt that this play is essentially about YOU, the closing scene ought to convince you otherwise; if that scene makes you cringe, as I saw somebody complain, you've not really been watching). Its texts are wonderfully written, unafraid of pathos, farce and intellectualism alike, and fiercely direct in their expression. The acting of the whole cast is formidable. Pacino may be redoing previous roles (Devil's Advocate sprang to mind), but boy, does this Roy Cohn have clout, and in the end, how peculiarly difficult it is to really hate him… Patrick Wilson is the perfect pretty boy with a dark secret, and knows how to bring his torment across. Marie-Louise Parker at times has you wondering if she's really been taking pills (and I mean that as a compliment). There simply can't be another Louis than Ben Shenkman (that role was seriously miscast in the Dutch theater production I saw in '95), and Justin Kirk plays his taxing role with utter conviction. Jeffrey Wright goes all out on his ex-drag-queen-with-an-attitude character, and yet succeeds to remain believable as a person. Streep and Thompson are no less great, but I really feel the laurels in the end belong with Parker, Shenkman, Kirk and Wilson. To top it all off, the imagery is beautiful and full of fantasy, without going overboard on bloodless digital effects (it is still a play, remember). The atmosphere is often subtly and hauntingly unreal. And Thomas Newman's score – well, like any truly good music, words cannot do it justice.


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