6.7/10
47
1 user 4 critic

Jibeopneun cheonsa (1941)

Myeong-ja, a flower vendor in Seoul, and her young brother Yong-pil, are orphans who have been taken in by some very bad people. Yong-pil finds refuge in a private orphanage and Myeong-ja takes her chances with a flower customer.

Director:

In-kyu Choi (as In-kyu Ch'oe)

Writers:

Motosada Nishiki (screenplay), Motosada Nishiki (story)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Il-hae Kim Il-hae Kim ... Bang Seong-bin
Ye-bong Mun Ye-bong Mun ... Maria
Eun-sun Hong Eun-sun Hong ... Anna
Shin-jae Kim Shin-jae Kim ... Myeongja
Hong-sik Kang Hong-sik Kang ... An In-gyu (as Hun Jin)
Sang-ha Li Sang-ha Li ... Lyong-gil
Woo-ho Kim Woo-ho Kim ... Yeong-pal (as Kim U-ho)
Eisaku Shirakawa Eisaku Shirakawa ... Tong-tol
Sang-don Hwang Sang-don Hwang ... Il-nam
Gyeong-chi Nam Gyeong-chi Nam ... Hwa-san
Bong-chun Yun Bong-chun Yun ... Gwon Seo-bang
Jeong-ae Gang Jeong-ae Gang ... Gwon's wife
Chang-Hyeong Bag Chang-Hyeong Bag ... Henchman
Un-hag Kim Un-hag Kim ... Henchman
Hyeon Lyu Hyeon Lyu ... Henchman
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Storyline

Myeong-ja, a flower vendor in Seoul, and her young brother Yong-pil, are orphans who have been taken in by some very bad people. Yong-pil finds refuge in a private orphanage and Myeong-ja takes her chances with a flower customer.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Korea | Japan

Language:

Japanese | Korean

Release Date:

19 February 1941 (Korea) See more »

Also Known As:

Homeless Angel See more »

Filming Locations:

Seoul, South Korea

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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User Reviews

 
Neorealism in occupied Korea
6 March 2008 | by nmegaheySee all my reviews

Partly based on the real story of a man who set up his own orphanage to look after street children, there's an air of social-realism about 'Angels on the Streets'. Having already been living under Japanese occupation before the Second World War, Korean film-making consequently shows characteristics that would come later in Italian neo-realism, but filmed while the country was at war and scripted by a Japanese writer, the heavier restrictions of censorship and propaganda placed on Korean filmmakers also makes its mark on Choi In-kyu's 1941 film.

Cruelly treated by one of the criminal gangs who exploit orphans and children living on the streets of Jong-ro in Seoul, Yong-gil (Lee Wook-ha) is separated from his sister Myung-ja (Kim Shin-jae) when he runs away. The young boy is taken in by Bang Seong-bin (Kim Il-hae), a kindly man who has helped many children in a similar predicament, much to the despair of his wife (Moon Yae-bong) who wonders where they are going to house them all. Seong-bin arranges with his brother-in-law Doctor Ahu (Jin Hoon) to rent a larger place in the country and, with apparently no consideration for social services or concern about child labour laws, sets up a noodle workshop so that they can pay for their expenses. Initially finding the country dull after living on the city streets, the kids soon come to appreciate this new life – but for Yong-gil, it only reminds him of how difficult things must be for his sister. Problems arise however which reunite them, but also bring trouble to their door.

Well made and performed with conviction by the cast, Angels on the Streets is for the most part great drama in the style of Ozu's 'Record of a Tenement Gentleman', De Sica's 'Shoeshine' and the Chinese classic 'Street Angel'. Suddenly and quite bizarrely however the propaganda elements creep in towards the end of the film, the children all line-up and bow down before the Japanese flag, pledging allegiance to the great Japanese empire. This has the impact of making what appears to be a standard drama something different entirely, showing young Korean's working to rebuild a better world where even the most hardened cases can be transformed by solid Japanese values.

While ideologically there are evidently problems with such a viewpoint, it doesn't detract from the overall dramatic construction and entertainment value of 'Angels on the Streets', but rather places an intriguing slant on the historic context in which the film was made.


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