6.2/10
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747 user 208 critic

Solaris (2002)

Trailer
1:41 | Trailer
A troubled psychologist is sent to investigate the crew of an isolated research station orbiting a bizarre planet.

Director:

Steven Soderbergh

Writers:

Stanislaw Lem (novel), Steven Soderbergh (screenplay)
2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
George Clooney ... Chris Kelvin
Natascha McElhone ... Rheya
Viola Davis ... Gordon
Jeremy Davies ... Snow
Ulrich Tukur ... Gibarian
John Cho ... DBA Emissary #1
Morgan Rusler ... DBA Emissary #2
Shane Skelton Shane Skelton ... Gibarian's Son
Donna Kimball ... Mrs. Gibarian
Michael Ensign ... Friend #1
Elpidia Carrillo ... Friend #2
Kent Faulcon ... Patient #1 (as Kent D. Faulcon)
Lauren Cohn ... Patient #2 (as Lauren M. Cohn)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Tony Clemons Tony Clemons ... Dinner Guest
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Storyline

Grieving psychologist Chris Kelvin is sent to investigate a lonely space station orbiting the mysterious planet Solaris, where terrified crewmembers are experiencing a host of strange phenomena, including impossibly halcyon visitors that seem all too human. Once aboard, he confronts an unfathomable power that could hold the key to mankind's deepest dreams and darkest nightmares. Written by Spiricom

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There are no answers. Only Choices. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 on appeal for sexuality/nudity, brief language and thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

George Clooney said that Steven Soderbergh was originally considering another actor for the lead so Clooney wrote him a letter asking to be considered as he thought a letter would be "less personal" if Soderbergh wanted to turn him down. Clooney said, "thank God the other actor turned it down." The other actor was Daniel Day-Lewis. See more »

Goofs

Gordon says she's getting agoraphobic. Agoraphobia is an irrational fear of going out and facing crowds of people. Gordon is living on a Space Station. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Chris's memories, in voiceover]
Rheya Kelvin: Chris, what is it? I love you so much. Don't you love me anymore?
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Crazy Credits

There are no credits at the beginning. All the credits are at the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Cargo (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Riddle Box
Written by Mike E. Clark and Violent J (as Joseph Bruce)
Performed by Insane Clown Posse
Courtesy of Jive Records
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User Reviews

 
An interesting statement about the inability to let go
18 November 2004 | by mentalcriticSee all my reviews

As a science fiction film, Solaris follows the same rule as the best of the genre, namely that it isn't the creatures or technology that makes the viewers want to watch, it is the human drama. Which is just as well, because the film itself is slower than the proverbial wet week, in spite of being less than a hundred minutes in length. Nonetheless, I will be very interested to see future projects from Steven Soderbergh.

The plot revolves around a psychologist who is suffering deep emotional problems, which mainly seem to revolve around the suicide of his wife. So when he is floating aimlessly around a spaceship that orbits the titular planet, apparitions of his wife begin appearing. From what I am able to discern, an alien intelligence is trying to take over the ship's crew, in the hope that the ship will return to Earth and take them with it. Of course, the crew have other ideas.

In essence, it sounds a lot like the basic plot for Alien, minus the violence. Alien has a degree of violence, most of which is implied, and so too does Solaris. The difference here is that the violence is not essential to the plot. In fact, aside from a couple of corpses, you never really get to see any. Instead, we are given a good deal of exposition regarding the doctor's feelings regarding his wife and what he would do to have her back in any shape or form. When the Solaris alien appears in his cabin, it tells him everything he wants to hear, and appears exactly as he desires.

The big question posed by the film is whether we are the sum of how we, and more importantly other people, remember us, or whether there's more that defines our reality. Having struggled with other people's wrong impressions of me for most of my life, I have often pondered this question myself. When the apparition-clone of Rheya is suddenly deciding that it would be best for her and Chris if she no longer existed in this form, she asks simply if she has simply been slapped together from Chris' memories or desires. Nobody ever knows all there is to know about another person, and that's what makes the surrealism of the story so compelling.

I gave Solaris a seven out of ten. It was slow, and it could have been at least ten minutes longer, but it works as a nice little piece of thinking entertainment. Give it a once over, and you might be pleasantly surprised.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 November 2002 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Solaris See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$47,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,752,722, 1 December 2002

Gross USA:

$14,973,382

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$30,002,758
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS (8 channels)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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