When a son of a gangster shark boss is accidentally killed while on the hunt, his would-be prey and his vegetarian brother decide to use the incident to their own advantage.

Writers:

Michael J. Wilson (screenplay), Rob Letterman (screenplay) | 8 more credits »
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Popularity
2,404 ( 6)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 3 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Will Smith ... Oscar (voice)
Robert De Niro ... Don Lino (voice)
Renée Zellweger ... Angie (voice)
Jack Black ... Lenny (voice)
Angelina Jolie ... Lola (voice)
Martin Scorsese ... Sykes (voice)
Ziggy Marley ... Ernie (voice)
Doug E. Doug ... Bernie (voice)
Michael Imperioli ... Frankie (voice)
Vincent Pastore ... Luca (voice)
Peter Falk ... Don Feinberg (voice)
Katie Couric ... Katie Current (voice)
David Soren David Soren ... Shrimp / Worm / Starfish #1 / Killer Whale #2 (voice)
David P. Smith David P. Smith ... Crazy Joe (voice)
Bobb'e J. Thompson ... Shortie #1 (voice)
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Storyline

The sea underworld is shaken up when the son of shark mob boss Don Lino (Robert De Niro) is found dead, and a young fish named Oscar (Will Smith) is found at the scene. Being a bottom feeder, Oscar takes advantage of the situation and makes himself look like he killed the finned mobster. Oscar soon comes to realize that his claim may have serious consequences.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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In fall, a new school will rule. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some mild language and crude humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Oscar goes to the time clock, there is a note on the wall saying, "If you don't come in Saturday, don't bother..." This is a reference to a famous memo Jeffrey Katzenberg sent to executives while he was with Disney. See more »

Goofs

When Lenny says "Okay." while untying Dewey from the fishhook, his mouth doesn't move. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[a shark slowly approaches a worm, who frantically struggles to get free of his line...]
Lenny: Hi, I'm Lenny.
[the worm faints]
Lenny: Ooh! Little buddy, did I scare you?
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Crazy Credits

The DreamWorks logo has the fishing boy casts his fishing line into the ocean (with the worm on the hook encountering Lenny). See more »

Alternate Versions

For each international release, the role of the news reporter "Katie Current" was recast to a prominent female news anchor of that country: In the Australian version it is Tracy Grimshaw, former co-anchor of the Australian Today show; in the UK version it is 'Fiona Phillips', presenter of GMTV; and in the Italian version it is Cristina Parodi, anchor-woman of Verissimo. See more »


Soundtracks

Car Wash (Shark Tale Mix)
Written by Norman Whitfield
Contains additional lyrics by Missy Elliott (as Missy Elliott)
Performed by Christina Aguilera featuring Missy Elliott (as Missy Elliott)
Produced by Missy Elliott (as Missy Elliott) and Ron Fair
Christina Aguilera appears courtesy of The RCA Records Label
Missy Elliott appearts courtesy of The Gold Mind/Elektra Records
Contains a sample of "Car Wash"
Performed by Rose Royce
Courtesy of Geffen Records
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

 
Lifeless product of Hollywood groupthink, devoid of even the slightest inspiration
2 December 2004 | by filmbuff-36See all my reviews

Had "Shark Tale" had even an iota of the wit and charm that seems to have little trouble finding its way into Pixar's creations, the movie might have been more enjoyable. At the least the filmmakers could have snuck in some funny social commentary through the veil of animation.

What we have instead is an urban, glib, lifeless product that is market-tested and ready for consumption. An empty ghetto-fabulous morality tale loaded with pop culture references and plenty of bling-bling but no heart.

Under the ocean, Oscar (voice of Will Smith) is a tongue-scrubber at a "whale-wash" and part-time hustler. He wishes for a better life, hoping to swim his way to the top of the fish social ladder, though his coworker Angie (voice of Renee Zellweger) thinks he should be happy with who he is, and tries to subtly drop hints that she's quite taken with him.

Meanwhile, great white shark and local crime boss Don Lino (voice of Robert De Niro) is planning to turn his family business over to his two sons, Frankie and Lenny. But Lenny (voice of Jack Black) is harboring some serious issues concerning eating other fish, and the godfather is worried his weak son with reflect poorly on him.

Oscar has problems. In debt to his boss Sykes (voice of Martin Scorsese), he soon ends up in hot water. However, fate runs him smack into Frankie and Lenny. During the scuffle, an anchor accidentally kills Frankie and Oscar is mistakenly given credit for the kill. Now a media celebrity for being a "shark slayer," Oscar rides his status all the way to the top, with Sykes managing his interests and the sharks fuming that their top spot in the food chain is quickly losing its power.

Situations soon escalate and Oscar and Lenny reach an agreement: if they fake a battle and Oscar emerges triumphant, he can keep his credibility as a shark slayer and Lenny can start a new life.

"Shark Tale" openly references "The Godfather" and "Jaws" at every opportunity, which in and of itself isn't too bad except that so little is made of the main plot itself that the whole move feels like a patchwork of other, better movies, just with a meaningless hip-hop attitude. The special effects are up to par but there's nothing really special about them. The audience needs a story and characters, not just choreographed dance sequences and goofy product placements.

All this might have been negligible had the movie actually been funny. This, sadly, is not the case. I only recorded one good laugh during the screening I attended, and that involved a shark voiced by Peter Falk whose flatulence had the expected effect on a henchmen. When a fart joke is the best you have to offer, then you've got serious problems.

The story also steals shamelessly from the 1942 Disney cartoon "The Reluctant Dragon," which featured a fixed battle between a loudmouth braggart knight and a pacifist dragon to keep the locals off both their backs. That story was at least short and cute, neither of which can be said about this debacle.

Along with the plot, voice acting is pretty lifeless as well. Smith gets to indulge his ego, playing his own persona on screen once again, this time in fish form. De Niro and Scorsese seem to be having fun spoofing their own tough guy roles, but that's about it from them. The biggest surprise is how much of a laid-back performance Black gives. His trademark manic desperation is nowhere to be seen, playing instead a shockingly normal character. Had he cut loose, the scenes he's in might have been more enjoyable. What's stranger is his hiding of his vegetarian leanings from his dad is handled like an allegory for a gay person coming out to his parents.

When is Hollywood going to realize it doesn't matter how many famous actors you get to do voices for your characters; if the story sucks, then no amount of acting talent is going to save it? There are three Academy Award winners in this cast, just don't use that as a benchmark for excellence.

This all amounts to another animated project from DreamWorks high on energy and low on inspiration. After "Spirit: Stallion of the Cimmarron," "Road to El Dorado" and "Sinbad" all tanked, it's clear that the "Shrek" series is the only good thing the studio has going for it right now.

Of course, there's no escaping comparison to that other computer animated fish movie, either, and that's when this film looks most wanting. Where Pixar's "Finding Nemo" swam the full depths of the ocean, "Shark Tale" seems content to just tread water in the wading pool.

4 out of 10 stars. Pretty to look at, but any movie that tries to push this much "coolness" down your throat is just asking to be despised.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

DreamWorks

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 October 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Sharkslayer See more »

Filming Locations:

Los Angeles, California, USA

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Box Office

Budget:

$75,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$47,604,606, 3 October 2004

Gross USA:

$160,861,908

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$374,583,879
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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