8.1/10
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2 user 2 critic

Resin (2001)

A drug dealer, after getting arrested, beat-up in jail and his first felony conviction, vows to make one final score and a fresh start; but instead winds up in a showdown with a malicious ... See full summary »

Directors:

Vladimir Gyorski, Steven Sobel (uncredited)

Writer:

Steven Sobel
Reviews
2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
David Alvarado David Alvarado ... Zeke
Mia Kelly ... Sira
Michael Glazer Michael Glazer ... Glazer
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Brandon Beckner Brandon Beckner ... Narc
Phil Cohn Phil Cohn ... Public Defender #2
Michael Dong Michael Dong ... Friend #1
Dayvid Figler Dayvid Figler ... Prosecutor
Charles Nort Charles Nort ... Public Defender #1
Rudy Ruggiero ... Detective
Rick Seigel Rick Seigel ... Randy
Jeanie Wa Jeanie Wa ... Prosecutor
Matt Weinglass ... Frat Boy
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Storyline

A drug dealer, after getting arrested, beat-up in jail and his first felony conviction, vows to make one final score and a fresh start; but instead winds up in a showdown with a malicious legal system threatening to steal his most valued posessions: his freedom and his life. Written by Anonymous

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Plot Keywords:

drugs | dogme 95 | drug dealing | See All (3) »

Genres:

Drama

User Reviews

 
The first American Dogme 95 film is an exceptional piece of work.
5 January 2002 | by epetrovSee all my reviews

The stated purpose of the Dogme 95 manifesto is to strip the art of filmmaking of its decadent trappings and to return it to the purity that resides behind movie illusion. Theoretically, the Dogme Vow of Chastity should force the filmmaker and, therefore, the viewer, to confront the essentials presented on the screen without intervention or amelioration. Resin, the first American Dogme film is an example of the movement at its best. The work has an explicit political agenda, and if the film is read simply as polemic, it is successful in making clear the tragic absurdities in the California penal code. However, Resin transcends its politics and renders an unforgettable portrait of a human being caught in the dispassionate machinery of a society which first alienates then destroys him. The camera's unrelenting eye, stripped of artifice, binds us to Zeke in his struggle with a system in which he clearly never had a chance and forces us to confront his vulnerability, the inarticulate youthfulness which is helpless against the slick maneuverings of the forces marshaled against him: the public defenders, the narcs, the prosecuting attorneys. In Resin, the Dogme technique of apparent cinematic artlessness, paradoxically, has itself become art, while the practices employed in the destruction of movie illusion have created a far more complex illusion: the sense that we have somehow come to know and to lament as real, a young man who exists only on film.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

22 August 2001 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Send in the Clowns See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Organic Film See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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