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Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)

Trailer
0:32 | Trailer
Harry Potter, Ron and Hermione return to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry for their third year of study, where they delve into the mystery surrounding an escaped prisoner who poses a dangerous threat to the young wizard.

Director:

Alfonso Cuarón

Writers:

J.K. Rowling (novel), Steve Kloves (screenplay)
Popularity
247 ( 75)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 17 wins & 51 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Daniel Radcliffe ... Harry Potter
Richard Griffiths ... Uncle Vernon
Pam Ferris ... Aunt Marge
Fiona Shaw ... Aunt Petunia
Harry Melling ... Dudley Dursley
Adrian Rawlins ... James Potter
Geraldine Somerville ... Lily Potter
Lee Ingleby ... Stan Shunpike
Lenny Henry ... Shrunken Head
Jimmy Gardner Jimmy Gardner ... Ernie the Bus Driver
Gary Oldman ... Sirius Black
Jim Tavaré ... Tom the Innkeeper
Robert Hardy ... Cornelius Fudge
Abby Ford Abby Ford ... Young Witch Maid
Rupert Grint ... Ron Weasley

Gary Oldman Through the Years

Take a look back at Gary Oldman's movie career in photos.

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Storyline

Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) is having a tough time with his relatives (yet again). He runs away after using magic to inflate Uncle Vernon's (Richard Griffiths') sister Marge (Pam Ferris), who was being offensive towards Harry's parents. Initially scared for using magic outside the school, he is pleasantly surprised that he won't be penalized after all. However, he soon learns that a dangerous criminal and Voldemort's trusted aide Sirius Black (Gary Oldman) has escaped from Azkaban Prison and wants to kill Harry to avenge the Dark Lord. To worsen the conditions for Harry, vile creatures called Dementors are appointed to guard the school gates and inexplicably happen to have the most horrible effect on him. Little does Harry know that by the end of this year, many holes in his past (whatever he knows of it) will be filled up and he will have a clearer vision of what the future has in store. Written by Soumitra

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Cast your spell in IMAX. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for frightening moments, creature violence and mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Perhaps the most noticeable difference between this movie and the two previous movies is the characters' costumes; incoming costume designer Jany Temime (the third costume designer the franchise has had) gave most of the characters completely new wardrobes, and also re-designed the Hogwarts school uniforms and Quidditch robes. Temime wanted to bring a more modern look to the characters, at the same time being careful not to make them look too trendy. The only character whose outfit did not receive an overhaul was Severus Snape, as Temime thought that the existing billowing black robe suited the character. Temime ended up designing the costumes for all of the subsequent movies as well. See more »

Goofs

(at around 1h 29 mins) When Hermione jumps over the branch of the Whomping Willow, you can see the cables pulling her up. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Harry: Lumos Maxima!
[five times]
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Crazy Credits

When the credits are at the end, we hear Harry say 'Mischief managed.' and all the text goes away, replaced by the film's logo. Then he says 'Nox' and the screen fades to black. After the screen goes dark there is a familiar noise before the film finally ends. See more »

Alternate Versions

Although the film was shot in the Super 35 process, the Full Screen DVD version Pans and Scans as if it were shot in Anamorphic Widescreen instead of properly framing it for Full Frame as most Super 35 films are. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Top Gear: Hammond Runs With the Bulls (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Double Trouble
(uncredited)
Lyrics by William Shakespeare
Conducted, Composed, and Produced by John Williams
Performed by 'The London Oratory School Schola'
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User Reviews

 
A visual feast with bite
13 June 2004 | by madam_QSee all my reviews

Harry Potter is growing up! The voice is deepening, the shoulders are broadening and...hurray! You no longer feel like a creep for having a little crush on Daniel Radcliffe...whoops, did I say that out loud? Say what you will, I see him making the jump from child star to adult actor in a way that Haley Joel Osment only dreams of.

Appropriately, this third film in the Harry Potter series has matured along with it's young stars. At first glance the storyline itself is relatively simple - Sirius Black has escaped from Azkaban Prison and young Harry is on his hit list. But the reality is that this movie is about being a teenager and all the trials and tribulations that go with it. On one level, Harry is like any other kid at school - he puts up with torment from bullies, gets into scrapes with his teachers and hangs out with his friends. But this is not just any school. This is Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and Harry has a whole OTHER set of problems. Like an escaped madman who may just want to kill him, for example.

The plot contains the requisite amounts of twists and turns. The focus is on Harry's past - Sirius Black was his godfather but just may have been in league with he who's name cannot be mentioned. There is the usual game of 'are they or aren't they?' when it comes to deciding which characters are really the baddies. Alan Rickman continues to walk the finest of lines between good and bad with his marvelous performance as Professor Snape. Has there ever been a better match of actor and character? Snape shows again that, while he may take occasional delight in making his students' lives difficult, he does have their best interests at heart - like any good teacher. Other plot quirks worked well - I enjoyed the way the time travel angle was worked in and the map showing the location of everyone in Hogwarts was a delight.

Visually, this is a much darker film and it is a sumptuous treat for the eyes. There is so much incredible detail in the sets that it's impossible to absorb it all in one sitting. All the staples from the other films are there - the paintings talk, the staircases move, ghosts roam the halls - watch out for the knights on horseback crashing through windows! The special effects are all top notch. A word of caution for any parents - there are some genuine scares here. The Dementors are particularly nasty, and I would certainly think twice about letting very young children watch this film. This is without even considering it's running time - two and a half hours - which is a very long time to expect some children to sit still.

One of the most impressive things about this film is the way that the young cast are more sure of themselves. As Hermione, Emma Watson grated in the first film with her occasional woodenness. Pleasingly, she has grown into herself as an actor and her performance here is much more mature. A leading lady of the future, perhaps? Hermione is growing up and is tired of being taken for an irritating goody-two shoes know it all. Rupert Grint provides comic relief and Daniel Radcliffe gives an outstanding performance, considering the whole film rests on his shoulders. Harry is the hero - the audience needs to identify with him. By the end of this film teenage girls will want to take him home to mother, while their mothers will just want to take him home and adopt him!

New cast members acquit themselves well. The role of Sirius Black was tailor made for Gary Oldman - he has a requisite creepiness with just a dose of humanity to bring the character to life. Daniel Thewlis is good as Professor Lupin, the new Defense Against the Dark Arts master who takes Harry under his wing. Emma Thompson is amusing as a Divinination professor with bad eyesight. She can see into the future but can't tell which students are falling asleep in her class!

Many have criticised Michael Gambon's performance as Dumbledore. While it's true that he is no Richard Harris, I personally was pleased that he didn't attempt to imitate his predecessor. Gambon is accomplished enough a performer to stay true to the character while at the same time putting his own stamp on it.

Take away the magic and monsters, and what you have is a coming of age movie. Harry is forced to grow up and confront both his past and his future, and come to terms with the reality that he is no ordinary wizard. With the spectra of 'you know who' continuing to loom on the horizon, roll on film four!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Warner Bros.

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 June 2004 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban: The IMAX Experience See more »

Filming Locations:

England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$130,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$93,687,367, 6 June 2004

Gross USA:

$249,975,996

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$796,221,906
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS | Dolby Digital | SDDS | DTS (DTS: X)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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