Winged Migration (2001) - News Poster

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Defying Expectations, Berlin Sees Surge in Movie Sales

Defying Expectations, Berlin Sees Surge in Movie Sales
Confounding industry pessimism, Berlin’s 2018 European Film Market proved the most vibrant in years, led by titles such as “Green Book” with Viggo Mortensen, “Kung Fury” with Michael Fassbender, “Afterburn” with Gerard Butler and Roland Emmerich’s epic “Maya Lord.”

The surprising buoyancy can be ascribed to a flurry of last-minute announcements of big new projects. Emmerich only presented “Maya Lord,” a historical drama budgeted in the $60 million-$70 million range, to buyers Thursday, the first day of the Efm. Even later came news of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s attachment to “Kung Fury,” and of the director (Jung Byung-gil) and sales agent (Capstone Group) for “Afterburn,” a $60 million futuristic action adventure.

By the weekend, there were at least a dozen big titles “which everyone, one way or another, is trying to get,” said Ivan Boeing of Brazil’s Imagem, talking about mainstream distributors.

Buzzy deals include the announcement Monday of distribution in most major territories for Lionsgate Intl.’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Berlinale: Studiocanal Introduces ‘One Nation, One King,’ ‘Mia and the White Lion’ (Exclusive)

Studiocanal, the film-tv production-distribution affiliate of Vivendi’s Canal Plus Group, will bring onto the market at Berlin one of France’s biggest plays of the year: “Un peuple, et son roi” (“One Nation, One King”), which Studiocanal will open in France on Sept. 26.

Budgeted at €16.9 million ($20.8 million), “One Nation, One King” is director Pierre Schoeller’s (“The Minister”) attempt to convey the scale of events of the 1789 French Revolution from the point of view of ordinary people, who for the first time were able to power events and develop a national consciousness instead of remaining passive victims.

Those revolutionaries are represented by two of France’s most-awarded young leads: Gaspard Ulliel, who won a best actor Cesar Award for Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World,” and Adèle Haenel, Cesar-nominated four times in the last decade, winning supporting actress for “Suzanne” and actress for “Love at First Fight.” Olivier Gourmet (“[link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Jackie’ Hits High, ‘Manchester By the Sea’ Continues Strong

  • Indiewire
Arthouse Audit: ‘Jackie’ Hits High, ‘Manchester By the Sea’ Continues Strong
This early December weekend usually launches a few prime awards hopefuls. Fox Searchlight often claims the date for such Oscar contenders as “Wild.” This year they present Chilean director Pablo Larraín’s first English-language movie “Jackie,” starring Oscar contender Natalie Portman as JFK’s grieving widow Jacqueline Kennedy in the week after her husband’s death.

The fall festival hit scored well, placing it in position to join four other recent breakout specialized films led by “Manchester by the Sea” (Roadside Attractions), “Loving” and “Nocturnal Animals” (Focus Features) and ongoing “Moonlight” (A24), all grossing over $600,000 this weekend and placing just a little below the Top Ten.

Opening

Jackie” (Fox Searchlight) – Metacritic: 79; Festivals include: Venice, Toronto, New York, AFI 2016

$275,000 in 5 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $55,000

Pablo Larraín’s second of three 2016 releases (along with “The Club” and upcoming “Neruda”) performed strongly in its initial New York/Los Angeles dates. Its
See full article at Indiewire »

Arthouse Audit: ‘Lion’ and ‘Miss Sloane’ Show Promise

  • Indiewire
Arthouse Audit: ‘Lion’ and ‘Miss Sloane’ Show Promise
Thanksgiving weekend usually launches a few of the top specialized releases of the year in New York and Los Angeles.

This year boasts two long-shot awards contenders, Weinstein Co’s “Lion” starring Dev Patel and EuropaCorp’s Jessica Chastain vehicle “Miss Sloane.” Both fell short of past high-end initial results, but showed sufficient strength to justify their respective strategies.

They enter a field of established specialty titles led by “Manchester by the Sea” (Roadside Attractions), “Nocturnal Animals” and “Loving” (Focus Features) as well as “Moonlight” (A24).

Opening

Lion” (Weinstein) – Metacritic: 64; Festivals include: Toronto, Hamptons, AFI 2016

$128,368 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $32,092

Getting the full Weinstein treatment — prime holiday release date, top New York/Los Angeles initial theaters, major ad support aiming at not only specialized but eventual crossover audiences — this Australia-produced India family reunion story opened to respectable initial numbers. While “Lion” lacks the high-end reviews that buoyed past
See full article at Indiewire »

Music Box Buys Nature Documentary ‘Seasons’ by ‘Winged Migration’ Filmmakers

Music Box Films has bought the U.S. rights to “Seasons” (“Les Saisons”), the latest documentary from filmmakers Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud.

Perrin and Cluzaud were the co-directors of 2001’s “Winged Migration,” which was nominated for an Academy Award, and 2010’s “Oceans.”

“Seasons” has opened in France to strong box office. Music Box Films plans a fall release in the U.S.

The documentary compresses the stretch between the Ice Age and the modern era into a single seasonal cycle of its own. It includes footage of animals in the wild, along with the long and tumultuous shared history that inextricably binds humankind with the natural world.

Music Box Films managing director Ed Arentz said of the acquisition, “In ‘Winged Migration,’ ‘Oceans’ and now in ‘Seasons,’ Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud’s amazingly innovative films have captured the beauty, drama and preciousness of wildlife in ways that we have simply never seen before.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Study finds romcoms teach female filmgoers to tolerate 'stalking myths'

University of Michigan report suggests women who watch movies such as High Fidelity and Love Actually are more accepting of aggressive male behaviour

If you ever felt a little uncomfortable watching Andrew Lincoln’s cue-card delivered confession of devotion for Keira Knightley in Love Actually, or wondered whether it was appropriate for Ben Stiller to hire a private eye to track down his high school crush in There’s Something About Mary, it turns out science is on your side. A new study suggests romcoms that feature men engaging in stalker-like behaviour can make women more likely to tolerate obsessiveness from prospective romantic partners.

I Did It Because I Never Stopped Loving You, a report by the gender and sexuality expert Julia R Lippman, of the University of Michigan, examined women’s response to questions about aggressive romantic behaviour after watching a series of films with differing themes. Lippman found
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Study finds romcoms teach female filmgoers to tolerate 'stalking myths'

University of Michigan report suggests women who watch movies such as High Fidelity and Love Actually are more accepting of aggressive male behaviour

If you ever felt a little uncomfortable watching Andrew Lincoln’s cue-card delivered confession of devotion for Keira Knightley in Love Actually, or wondered whether it was appropriate for Ben Stiller to hire a private eye to track down his high school crush in There’s Something About Mary, it turns out science is on your side. A new study suggests romcoms that feature men engaging in stalker-like behaviour can make women more likely to tolerate obsessiveness from prospective romantic partners.

I Did It Because I Never Stopped Loving You, a report by the gender and sexuality expert Julia R Lippman, of the University of Michigan, examined women’s response to questions about aggressive romantic behaviour after watching a series of films with differing themes. Lippman found
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Seasons’

Film Review: ‘Seasons’
Four years in the making and 15,000 in the telling, French co-directors Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud’s millennia-spanning “Seasons” does for beasts of the land what the duo’s “Winged Migration” and “Oceans” did for those of the air and sea, with two notable caveats. First, while it features some of the most breathtaking nature photography this side of BBC’s “Planet Earth” miniseries, this gorgeously cinematic docu ties said footage to a leaden all-purpose eco-consciousness message that nearly spoils the otherwise timeless experience. And second, the animals and environments on offer aren’t nearly as exotic — mostly wolves and wild horses — limiting the gee-whiz factor to younger audiences than might have turned out for their internationally acclaimed earlier collaborations.

After innovating camera rigs that could soar and swim alongside their previous animal subjects, the visionary helmers thought long and hard about how best to tackle terrestrial creatures, ultimately deciding
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Eight Films About the Animal World to Land Best Doc Oscar Noms

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

Virunga National Park — a Unesco World Heritage Site in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Africa’s oldest national park — is home to the world’s last mountain gorillas. Director Orlando von Einsiedel presents the troubling and dangerous situation the park rangers face as they try to protect the endangered wildlife from poachers and militant rebels in Virunga, a Netflix documentary. Additionally, the film explores the environmental threat posed by the oil industry, particularly the oil exploration done by the British company Soco International. (In June, Soco International announced that they would cease operations.)

Though the filming of the documentary took place in 2011 and 2012, Leonardo DiCaprio teamed up with Netflix as an executive producer on the film, which was released simultaneously on Netflix and in theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Nov. 7. He recently told The Hollywood Reporter that he wants to
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

what’s on Netflix and Amazon Instant Video (from May 06)

What’s new, what’s hot, and what you may have missed, now available to stream.

streaming now, before it’s on dvd

The Monuments Men: as jaunty as Jean Dujardin’s beret, but in a sincere, old-fashioned kind of way; could almost have been rediscovered from the 1940s [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video] Whitewash: nowhere near as blackly funny as it wants to be, but Thomas Haden Church is strangely compelling as a man befuddled by the vagaries of fate [my review] [at Amazon Instant Video]

new to Prime

Fantastic Voyage: the 1966 sci-fi classic; see it the first time or again before the James Cameron remake hits [at Amazon Instant Video]

recent films new to stream

1976: Hunt vs. Lauda: as with the semifictionalized Rush, this documentary look at the first superstars of Formula One is gripping even if you couldn’t care less about racing [my review] [at Netflix] The Pervert’s Guide to Ideology: hugely entertaining documentary look at how culture shapes our attitudes,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Oscar's Documentaries: Tales from the Shortlist (Part 2)

Glenn continues his 3 part look at the 15 finalists for Best Documentary. (Here is part one if you missed it). Watch along with us!

Blackfish

Synopsis: How do you solve a problem like SeaWorld? Animal cruelty is exposed at SeaWorld theme parks and others associated with it around the globe. Particularly of interest is that of Tilikum, a 5,400kg orca responsible for multiple deaths including trainer Dawn Brancheau.

Director: Gabriela Cowperthwaite (City Lax: Un Urban Lacrosse Story)

Festivals: AFI Docs, Athens, Hamburg, Hot Docs, Kosovo, Melbourne, Miami, Moscow, Rio de Janeiro, Seoul, Sitges, Sundance, True/False

Awards: Best Documentary 2nd Place (Boston Film Critics), Best Documentary (Washington DC), Best Feature (Nominee, International Documentary Association)

Box Office: $2.07mil (max. 99 screens), out now on DVD/Blu-ray/VOD

Review: From my review back in July:

Its mission is similar to that of Oscar-winning eco-doc The Cove, and would make a curious companion to Jacques Audiard’s Rust & Bone.
See full article at FilmExperience »

On ‘Blackfish’ and the Understated Influence of Documentaries

By Søren Hough

Contributor

* * *

“Never capture what you can’t control.”

So says the tagline for Blackfish, Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s muckraking new documentary — currently being distributed in select art-house theaters by Magnolia Pictures — which is a stunning indictment of the manner in which SeaWorld has captured and treated wild orca whales over the years. The film could have an enormous impact on tourism and revenue for the theme park chain — but the ramifications of this exposé will extend beyond the director’s intended target.

Blackfish has been welcomed with open arms by critics. With an 84 on Metacritic and a 98 on Rotten Tomatoes, the film is being hailed as a well-crafted documentary that has brought about a paradigm-shift in terms of the public’s thoughts about show animals. And it is also generating some serious awards buzz — see our own Scott Feinberg‘s latest forecast over at The Hollywood Reporter — with
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Bruce, Pinker rise at Falco Ink

  • ScreenDaily
Falco Ink partners Janice Roland and Shannon Treusch announced the promotions on Wednesday [24]

Erin Bruce is named senior vice-president and Joanna Pinker rises to senior account executive at the public relations firm.

“Erin Bruce has worked closely with us since the late ‘90s,” said Roland. “Her dedication and perseverance on behalf of her accounts are unparalleled.”

“Joanna Pinker is a strategic thinker that has brought her enthusiasm and ideas to our digital media division,” said Treusch. “She is at the forefront of a constantly evolving digital community.”

Bruce has been in marketing and public relations for 15 years and her expertise in film and television includes Us and international fiction and non-fiction films.

Her campaign credits include Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind, Y Tu Mamá Tambien, Rachel Getting Married, Winged Migration, Manhunt and Olympus Has Fallen.

She has attended Sundance and Toronto for the past 12 years and handled festival publicity for The Film Society Of Lincoln Center
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Movie Poster of the Week: Jacques Demy’s “Donkey Skin”

  • MUBI
The Cinémathèque Française is currently running a major exhibition titled Le monde enchanté de Jacques Demy (through August 4) devoted to the great romantic fantasist who brought us such candy-colored musical reveries as The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, The Young Girls of Rochefort and Donkey Skin. What caught my eye was a video on their website (unsubtitled, unfortunately) in which the head of the poster department, Jacques Ayroles, takes us into the Cinémathèque’s vaults (which contain some 25,000 posters) and talks about the various posters for Demy’s films.

The exhibition seems to place particular emphasis on Peau d’Âne or Donkey Skin, Demy’s beloved Cocteau-esque fantasy which, in 1970, was his greatest success (with over 2 million admissions in France) and which came hot on the heels of one of his most disappointing flops, the L.A.-set Model Shop. Based on the 17th-century fairytale by Charles Perrault (famously illustrated by Gustave Doré
See full article at MUBI »

Is Dinesh D'Souza's Anti-Obama Movie Truly Ahead of Michael Moore, Al Gore Docs in North America?

2016 movie still trailing Michael Moore, Al Gore 2016 Obama's America, Dinesh D'Souza and John Sullivan's anti-Obama documentary, has surpassed the concert movie Katy Perry: Part of Me to become the second highest-grossing non-fiction film released in North America in 2012. By Sunday evening, D'Souza and Sullivan's right-wing doc -- current cume according to the web site Box Office Mojo stands at an estimated $27.66 million (as of Wed., September 13) -- should have also surpassed the nature doc Chimpanzee ($28.97 million) to become the year's top documentary in the United States and Canada. Worldwide, 2016 -- a 100% domestic sleeper hit like, say, the Tyler Perry movies (which have no audience overseas) -- remains behind both Chimpanzee (another domestic-only release) and Katy Perry: Part of Me. (Please scroll down for more details about the box-office performances of non-fiction films worldwide both in 2012 and "all-time.") As per numerous box-office reports, as the sixth biggest non-fiction film ever (or rather,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'50 Documentaries To See Before You Die': Do you agree?

For the last four weeks, Current TV has been running down its list of 50 documentaries every person must see in his/her lifetime. Tomorrow night, the series unveils its No. 1 documentary: Hoop Dreams. Steve James’ moving portrayal of inner city athletes is a safe choice to top the list of docs, though its only Oscar nomination at the time was for editing. Still, there are some glaring omissions that made room for host Morgan Spurlock’s Supersize Me (#5) and network honcho Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth (#8), not to mention more dubious inclusions like last year’s Catfish. See what
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Netflix Nuggets: Slam Dunks, Body Slams & Navy Seals!

Netflix has revolutionized the home movie experience for fans of film with its instant streaming technology. Netflix Nuggets is my way of spreading the word about independent, classic and foreign films being made available by Netflix for instant streaming. Important Note: There may be some films that do not become available on the specified dates. This is merely a report of the most accurate release dates I can find, but is not directly confirmed by Netflix themselves.

The Tourist (2010)

Streaming Available: 07/07/2011

Synopsis: Watery Venice, Italy, provides the setting as Johnny Depp, playing an American tourist seeking solace for his shattered heart, instead finds it in danger again after encountering a beautiful Interpol agent (Angelina Jolie). Little does the Yank know that the artful lady has gone to great lengths to arrange their “chance” meeting and is using him to trap a thief who happens to be her ex-lover. The film
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oceans Blu-Ray Review And Giveaway

Oceans, the latest release from the people who brought you Earth, is an amazing treat, and one of the best displays of Blu-Ray possibilities you’re going to find. A somewhat more interesting endeavor frankly, mostly devoid of Earth‘s agenda, Oceans takes you right into the action in ways that are often impossible to imagine.

While Earth took viewers on an adventure that was often beyond the realm of description, there is something even more compelling about the journey underwater. More than simply the unique and breathtaking features and facets of the world we know, Oceans takes you to the very heart of what is simply another world altogether.

Following the pattern of previous efforts, Oceans finds its focal points and takes us along to experience life as we never have before. Immersive in a sense that brings new meaning to the word, the film puts audiences right next
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Disney's 'Oceans' and 'The Crimson Wing' Are Naturally Spectacular

If you think that the BBC is unmatched in its output of natural history documentaries, think again. In the last couple of years a new heavy hitter has arrived on the scene and it has had plenty of practice at pleasing audiences: Walt Disney. On Earth Day last year the Disneynature branch of the company released its first film: the epic-themed Earth. This year the studio followed up with Oceans and, in some overseas territories, The Crimson Wing: Mystery of the Flamingos. Both have recently been committed to Blu-ray and they look absolutely stunning.

Oceans is exactly what the title suggests: an expansive documentary on ocean life that also touches on the relationship between humanity and the sea. Directed by Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud (Winged Migration) Oceans has a narrative that is broad and covers a lot of geographical territory in its feature-length running time. Hence, it doesn’t
See full article at CinemaSpy »

Movie Review: Sweetgrass

Jun 28, 2010

If you find the sound of bleating sheep even mildly annoying or the sight of them reminds you of the ones you count to put you to sleep, the new documentary Sweetgrass may not be your best choice. The echo of always-noisy ovine carries through the entirety of Sweetgrass, a film about a migration of thousands of sheep across Montana. At once a nature documentary akin to something like Winged Migration or Planet Earth and also an ode to a way of life that’s clearly disappearing, Sweetgrass is a sometimes-mesmerizing and sometimes-dull piece ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com
See full article at CinemaNerdz »
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